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Tag: The Conjuring (1-10 of 13)

Box office report: '2 Guns' blows away competition with $27.4 million weekend; 'Smurfs 2' stalls

It’s bizarre to think that 2 Guns and The Smurfs 2 are competitors in any regard, but the pics happened to open in theaters on the same weekend. While the R-rated, buddy thriller and the PG-rated CG and live action sequel about some mystical blue creatures probably aren’t drawing the same audience, in the wold of box office returns, only the winner matters. And it turns out that more people turned out for the male-dominated violent comedy than for another kid-friendly sequel.

2 Guns (CinemaScore: B+) opened at first place, earning an estimated $27.4 million for the weekend. This is a squarely solid opening for stars Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg. According to exit polls, males, who comprised about 51 percent of the audience, gave the movie an A– CinemaScore. For director Baltasar Kormákur (The Deep), this opening is a career high. The charisma and chemistry of two stars seems key to the appeal, especially for a movie with such an ambiguous and generic “action” title.

Playing in 3,025 locations and averaging about $9,025 per screen, 2 Guns exceeded Universal’s expectations for the weekend, which had put the movie in the $20 million range. Co-financed by Emmett/Furla Films and Foresight Unlimited with an estimated production budget of about $61 million, the big question is: How the movie will fare in weeks to come? It remains to be seen whether or not the solid reviews and word-of-mouth buzz can help make it significant hit.

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Box office update: '2 Guns' blows past 'Smurfs 2' with a $10 million Friday

Here’s a tip: Never bring a Smurf sequel to a gun fight.

The Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg action pic 2 Guns proved to be a stronger contender this weekend than originally expected and walked away with an estimated $10 million on its first Friday in 3,025 theaters. Directed by Baltasar Kormákur (The Deep), the $61 million movie finds a DEA agent and a naval intelligence officer on the run together after a failed attempt to infiltrate a drug cartel. At least at first, neither knows that the other is also undercover. Kormákur’s Contraband, which also starred Wahlberg, opened in January of 2012 at $24.3 million. While Wahlberg may be an erratic performer at the box office, Washington is more reliable — the actor’s last six movies all opened above $20 million. As recently as Thursday, Universal predicted a $20 million opening, which seems modest now, as 2 Guns will likely easily win the weekend with at least $30 million.

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Box office preview: Will 'The Smurfs 2' beat 'The Wolverine' and Mark Wahlberg?

[UPDATED] On the surface, this weekend’s face-off between a sequel based on a Saturday morning cartoon and an R-rated action flick called 2 Guns sounds almost like a parody of the state of summer movie offerings.

The Smurfs 2 opened wide Wednesday, and the generically titled Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington feature hits theaters on Friday, and both will likely net out with similar earnings. Ultimately, even though neither movie seems destined to flop, both could be arriving a little too late to an over-saturated market. We’ve already seen a number of buddy action movies, including Pain and Gain, which also starred Wahlberg, and White House Down, and families have had at least a few animated options this summer alone.

Here’s how the weekend might play out:
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Box office report: 'The Wolverine' earns $55 million; Plus 'Despicable Me 2' crosses $300 million mark

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Sometimes even earning the No. 1 spot can be seen as a modest disappointment, or at least that’s what the new narrative around The Wolverine (CinemaScore: A-) would have you believe.

With no competition this weekend, The Wolverine pulled in about $55 million domestically in 3,924 locations — on target with studio estimates, but far below tracking projections, some of which went so far as to predict an $80 million weekend. With the majority of screens showing the Fox tentpole in 3-D, the movie averaged about $14,016 per screen on an estimated budget of $120 million, so this weekend’s performance is really nothing to scoff at. Interestingly, at $55 million, the film is right in line with 2011′s X-Men: First Class which made $55.1 million in its first three days at the box office in early June. But so far The Wolverine is holding steady as the second lowest opening of all of Fox’s six X-Men movies — that title goes to the first in the series which opened at $54.5 million. But X-Men was also released 13 years ago with no 3-D surcharges, so it’s not an entirely fair comparison.

The Wolverine opened internationally this weekend as well to grosses of $86.1 million, playing on 15,152 screens in 101 territories, bringing its worldwide total to about $141.1 million. Fox estimates that audiences were about 58 percet male, and 42 percent under the age of 25.
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Why we like exorcist movies: They don't just showcase the Devil, they conjure up God too

Last weekend, when I went to see The Conjuring, I expected to be scared, and I also thought that I was walking into a haunted-house movie. It certainly starts off as a haunted-house movie, with director James Wan throwing in every goose-the-audience gothic scare tactic (alarming blasts of music, sinister Victorian clown faces, ghostly figures popping up in mirrors) but the rattling of the kitchen sink. The film is, of course, “based on a true story,” in much the same way that virtually every rattletrap ghost thriller since The Amityville Horror (1979) has been “based on a true story.” (It really happened, folks! Step right up!) In this case, though, the presence of Ed and Lorraine Warren, a pair of legendary true-life paranormal investigators played by Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga, really does lend the proceedings a creepy, homespun verisimilitude. Not because, as the film tells us, she’s a “clairvoyant” and he’s a “demonologist” (which is borderline hilarious, as if they were worked in different science departments of the same university). No, it’s because The Conjuring, after a while, turns into an exorcist movie, at which point you realize that that’s what it was all along. When the Warrens are setting up their primitive camera equipment to record ghosts on film, they seem to be fairly standard movie characters (though they do exude the soft interpersonal touch of Christian marriage counselors). But when Patrick Wilson starts spouting Latin and shouting into the bloody face of a woman possessed, you understand why The Conjuring has scared up the enthusiastic audience it has. As a culture, we’re right in the middle of an exorcist moment. And we have been ever since the very, very scary day of Sept. 9, 2005. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: Can 'The Wolverine' save the summer box office?

Wolverine is all by his lonesome, tortured, extremely ripped self this weekend at the box office, and big things are expected. As the single new nationwide release, all eyes will be on the Fox juggernaut to see if it might actually be the summer movie to break through the box office slump with a strong opening. It’s not a question of whether or not it will win the weekend, it’s a question of just how brutally it will crush the recent big budget disappointments like The Lone Ranger, R.I.P.D., Pacific Rim, and White House Down. If anyone can take the pressure, it’s probably the clawed mutant.

Here’s how things might play out:
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Box office report: 'The Conjuring' spooks 'R.I.P.D.' with $41.5 million debut

Animated movies have topped the box office for the past four weekends, but this time around, audiences were ready to embrace something a bit edgier. As such, Warner Bros.’ horror film The Conjuring easily topped a crowded weekend with an eye-popping $41.5 million.

The $20 million James Wan-directed title garnered the best horror debut of the year, trumping The Purge‘s $34.1 million bow in May. It also had the second-best debut ever for an R-rated horror film, trailing only Paranormal Activity 3, which opened with $52.6 million in 2011. The film notched a powerful $14,306 per theater average, and if it receives strong word-of-mouth (which seems likely), it could become a $100 million smash. Audiences, which were 53 percent female and 59 percent above the age of 25, issued The Conjuring an excellent “A-” CinemaScore grade — an especially impressive rating given the fact that the horror genre that has seen its fair share of “D” and “F” grades.

The Conjuring‘s debut marks a career high for Wan, who broke onto the scene in 2004 with his $55.2 million hit Saw, a film so buzzy it steered horror films into the torture direction for years after its release. In 2011, Wan scored a spookier hit with Insidious, which, like The Conjuring, starred Patrick Wilson. Insidious earned $54 million against a $1.5 million budget and now has a sequel hitting theaters on September 13. The Conjuring will easily outgross both of those films, though it’s all but guaranteed that Wan’s next effort, Fast & Furious 7, will be his biggest hit yet. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'The Conjuring' summons $17 million on Friday, crushes pricey 'Turbo' and 'R.I.P.D.'

On a weekend stuffed with big-budget tentpoles, Warner Bros.’ modest horror release The Conjuring is scaring off every one of its rival releases. The $20 million James Wan-directed film pulled in $17 million on its first Friday at the box office. That’s slightly ahead of The Purge‘s $16.8 million opening Friday in may, and with better reviews and an excellent “A-” CinemaScore grade (a rarity in the horror genre), The Conjuring should surpass The Purge‘s $34.1 million debut. Right now, The Conjuring seems to be on pace for a $37 million weekend, which double Wan’s best previous opening, which came in 2004 when Saw cut up $18.3 million.

Despicable Me 2 held strong in second place with $7.5 million on its third Friday. The animated smash, which has already outgrossed Monsters University, wasn’t hurt too much by the arrival of yet another animated film, Turbo. Despicable Me 2 may capture another $25 million this weekend, which would push its total to $276 million.

In third place, Turbo, which had already earned $9.7 million on Wednesday and Thursday screenings, raced away with $6.5 million on its first Friday. The $135 million film about a snail (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) competing against racecars in the Indy 500, will take in about $19 million over its first weekend frame, which would give the Fox/DreamWorks release a lackluster $28.7 million in its first five days at the box office.

Grown Ups 2 fell 61 percent from its first Friday into fourth place with $6.4 million. The $80 million Adam Sandler comedy, which last weekend opened to $41.5 million, may take in another $20 million this weekend — good for a $79.5 million total.

Two new releases finished in fifth and sixth place. Red 2 took in $6.3 million on Friday, a full 14 percent drop from Red‘s $7.3 million opening Friday in 2010. The $85 million sequel may earn about $18 million this weekend. And then there was R.I.P.D., the Ryan Reynolds/Jeff Bridges action film that Universal say cost $130 million (though its budget has been reported at $154 million). R.I.P.D. earned just $4.8 million on Friday, which puts it on track for a disastrous $12.5 million debut and marks Universal’s first major misstep since Battleship.

Check back tomorrow for the full box office report.

Box office preview: 'The Conjuring' could race past 'Turbo' this weekend

This weekend, Ryan Reynolds will face himself at the box office (R.I.P.D. vs. Turbo), and Mary Louise Parker will too (Red 2 vs. R.I.P.D.), but neither star is likely to walk away with the No. 1 film. That distinction should belong to newcomer The Conjuring, which is scaring up huge pre-release buzz thanks to an extra-creepy marketing campaign. Here’s how I think the box office might look this weekend:

1. The Conjuring – $32 million
James Wan has made a name for himself in the horror genre with Saw and Insidious, two well-made projects that surprised box office analysts and critics alike. And he got a huge profile boost when he was named the director of the upcoming Fast & Furious 7. Thus, it’s no surprise that Wan’s latest project, The Conjuring, is arriving in theaters with heightened expectations. Of course, the film’s incredibly effective trailer — an extended scene that finds Lili Taylor playing hide-and-seek — has made it a buzzy release too.
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'The Conjuring 2' already in development

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Director James Wan’s new horror movie The Conjuring doesn’t open until later this week, but New Line is already developing a sequel to the film, which stars Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga as real-life paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren. Earlier Tuesday, Variety reported that Conjuring writers Carey and Chad Hayes were onboard to pen the sequel. A spokesperson for Warner Bros., with which New Line merged in 2008, confirmed to EW that a sequel is in development.
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