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Tag: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (1-9 of 9)

'The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey' passes $1 billion worldwide

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You did good, Bilbo.

It’s official. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey has passed the $1 billion mark worldwide, and it has its recent opening in China to thank. The film grossed $37.3 million in China since it opened 10 days ago, becoming only the 15th film to cross this benchmark worldwide. The top three are Avatar, Titanic, and The Avengers. Skyfall is currently in the number seven position with $1.1 billion worldwide.

In a statement announcing the news on Sunday, Veronika Kwan Vandenberg, President of International Distribution for Warner Bros. said “From Berlin to Beijing, it is so gratifying to see how the release of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey has been such an event with audiences around the world. We know that moviegoers everywhere are already excited about the next film, as are we.”

Peter Jackson’s adaptation of the J.R.R Tolkien novel has grossed $301.4 million domestically — well below the domestic totals of the individual films in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and none of those films had 3-D or IMAX ticket prices to help. Only The Return of the King made more than $1 billion worldwide, and notably, only $10.4 million of that came from China.

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‘Skyfall’ passes $1 billion worldwide

'The Hobbit,' 'Life of Pi,' and 'Fringe' lead the Saturn Award nominations

Peter Jackson’s first Hobbit movie may not have gotten much love from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, but the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror Films saw things differently, lavishing the fantasy epic with nine Saturn Award nominations today. The awards, now in their 39th year, honor the best genre films, TV shows, and home entertainment. They’ll be presented in June, though the ceremony’s exact date and location have yet to be announced.

Here’s a partial rundown of this year’s Saturn nominees, including the movies honored in its new independent film category. Visit the awards show’s website for a full list.

Best Science Fiction Film
Marvel’s The Avengers
Chronicle
Cloud Atlas
The Hunger Games
Looper
Prometheus

Best Fantasy Film
The Amazing Spider-Man
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
Life of Pi
Ruby Sparks
Snow White and the Huntsman
Ted

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Box office report: 'Texas Chainsaw' massacres competition with $23 million; 'Zero Dark Thirty' shines in limited release

Lionsgate’s Saw franchise may have gone the way of the dodo, but this weekend the studio re-birthed another horror franchise centered on a limb-mangling blade. Texas Chainsaw 3D, a sequel/reboot of the 1974 horror classic The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, bowed with a bloody good $23.0 million, making 2013 the second year in a row that a horror film has kicked off the year in first place. The Devil Inside debuted with $33.7 million last January.

Texas Chainsaw 3D started off slower than the 2003 Jessica Biel remake The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which opened with $28.1 million and found $80.6 million total, but it performed better than the 2006 prequel, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, which started with $18.5 million and earned $39.5 million overall. Texas Chainsaw 3D will likely finish somewhere between those two predecessors, perhaps with about $50-55 million domestically. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Texas Chainsaw 3D' faces off against 'The Hobbit'

The Hobbit managed to hold both Django Unchained and Les Miserables out of the top spot last weekend, but will it be able to do the same when facing off against 2013’s first new release, Texas Chainsaw 3D, as well as expanding drama Promised Land? Well, probably.

Here’s how the box office may shake out this weekend: READ FULL STORY

Box Office Report: 'The Hobbit' holds number one spot, 'Jack Reacher' and 'This is 40' disappoint

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It was a fairly slow weekend at the box office.

Despite a record-breaking opening, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey experienced a significant 57% drop off in its second week, bringing in an estimated $36.7 million, with an $8,952 per screen average. This brings The Hobbit’s ten-day gross to $149.9 million, tracking about 8% behind The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King’s ten-day gross.

Paramount’s Jack Reacher (Cinema Score: A-) opened this past weekend in second place with a modest $15.6 million. Based on the popular Lee Child-created character, the Tom Cruise action flick has been somewhat of a box office wild card and will have to struggle to maintain momentum to make up the costs for the $60 million production. The weekend prior to the Christmas holiday isn’t usually the strongest at the box office, but last year Cruise’s Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol opened wide on December 21 at $29.6 million. As many have already mentioned, Jack Reacher fans are perhaps put off by the casting, since the character is supposed to be physically imposing at 6’5″.

Judd Apatow’s comedy This is 40 (Cinema Score: B-) also opened this weekend at $12 million to take third place. Though not abysmal, it doesn’t hold a candle to the $22.7 million, number one opening for Funny People, Apatow’s last directorial effort. But of course, Funny People starred Adam Sandler, which likely contributed to the strong opening. A sort of-sequel to Knocked Up (which opened at $30.7 million), This is 40 stars Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann, and Albert Brooks, and boasts an impressively large cast including John Lithgow, Jason Segel, Chris O’Dowd, Megan Fox, Michael Ian Black, and Lena Dunham. But the 134-minute run time and Paul Rudd’s relatively low box office draw may have contributed to the low first weekend earnings.

Things did not fare as well for other weekend openings, including the Barbara Streisand and Seth Rogen road trip comedy The Guilt Trip (Cinema Score: B-) and Monsters, Inc. 3D, both of which failed to break the top five, bringing in $5.4 million and $5 million, respectively.

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Box office update: 'The Hobbit' plummets to $10.2M on Friday, but easily leads 'Jack Reacher' and 'This is 40'

Sure, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey set a December record last weekend when it opened with $84.5 million, but after eight days in theaters, it’s now clear that the Lord of the Rings prequel is running well behind the final LOTR film, The Return of the King, which earned $377.8 in 2003 — without 3D and IMAX surcharges.

The Hobbit dropped by a huge 73 percent from its first Friday to $10.2 million yesterday, which puts it on pace for a $33 million weekend. That would give The Hobbit a running total of about $147 million by Sunday, its tenth day of release. The Return of the King had earned $190.8 million after 10 days in theaters, and it was only about halfway to its final total, but The Hobbit is falling much faster, and it will need to hold up remarkably well over the holiday to have a shot at $300 million domestically. READ FULL STORY

'The Hobbit': The story behind Neil Finn's dwarvish end credits tune, 'Song of the Lonely Mountain'

The films of the Lord of the Rings trilogy left its audiences on the note of three ethereal women’s voices, including Annie Lennox, who earned Return of the King one of its 11 Oscars. Now as director Peter Jackson returns to Middle-earth with the dwarf-packed The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, the voice of New Zealand musician Neil Finn serenades the audience when its final frame fades to black.

“The story is very much a dwarf tale as much as it is called The Hobbit,” says Finn, who sings “Song of the Lonely Mountain,” the majestic and epic yet intimate and warm ballad of the dwarves that closes out the first film of Jackson’s new trilogy.

“Song of the Lonely Mountain” shares its melody with “Misty Mountains,” a tune heard earlier in the film that the 13 dwarves bellow in solemn baritone before setting out on their quest with Bilbo Baggins. New Zealand artists Plan 9 and David Long, who wrote and performed songs in The Lord of the Rings, brought their talents again to The Hobbit, setting J.R.R. Tolkien’s verse to music for “Misty Mountains.” The melody also appears in Howard Shore’s score, where it is brought to even greater heights with a stately brass section. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'The Hobbit' earns $13.0 million at midnight showings

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Warner Bros. has just announced that The Hobbit earned an estimated $13.0 million from midnight showings at 3,100 locations last night, giving it a per-theater average of $4,193 from midnight shows alone. It’s a nice recovery from the doldrums of the past two frames. When combined, the last two wide releases to hit theaters, Playing for Keeps and Killing Them Softly, couldn’t earn $13.0 million over their entire opening weekends. Included in The Hobbit‘s midnight figure is $1.6 million that the film earned from 326 IMAX theaters.

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'The Hobbit' at 48 frames per second: Is it possible for a movie to look TOO good?

When you think of all the radical, paradigm-shifting leaps that technology has taken over the last two decades — analog to digital! print to Internet! desktop to mobile! cathode ray tube to liquid crystal display! — the very sound of 48 frames per second has a “New And Improved!” golly-gee I’ll-see-you-and-raise-you-24-frames clunkoid quaintness about it. It doesn’t sound like the future, exactly; it sounds like the past on steroids. Forty-eight frames per second, of course, is how fast the images are going to be shooting through projectors at 450 of the theaters showing Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey starting today. If you see the film at one of those theaters, you’re going to experience the kickoff moment of an up-and-coming film-image revolution. Or so the producers of The Hobbit would have you believe. READ FULL STORY

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