Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: The Judge (1-10 of 11)

Box office report: 'Dracula Untold' can't suck the blood out of 'Gone Girl'

gone-girl-10.jpg

Despite an impressive showing, Dracula was no match for Amazing Amy, even in her second weekend in theaters. David Fincher’s adaptation of Gone Girl took the top spot again, only falling 30 percent from its debut weekend, with an estimated $26.8 million. The Fox pic, which cost around $61 million to produce, has grossed $78.3 million domestically so far and looks poised to go on to be Fincher’s highest earner (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button holds the current title with $127.5 million).

Universal’s Dracula Untold, an origin story of the classic character starring Luke Evans, opened in second place with $23.5 from 2,887 theaters, including IMAX ($4 million from 351 screens) and large format screens. The PG-13 rated fantasy cost around $70 million to produce and has already made $62.6 million from 42 territories internationally. Audiences, which were 57 percent male and 39 percent under age 25, seemed to enjoy the dark tale, too, giving it an A- CinemaScore. “It’s better than anyone expected in the industry. With exit polls as strong as they were, it’s promising,” says Universal’s president of domestic distribution Nikki Rocco. “We’re very pleased with the result.”

READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Dracula Untold' leads, 'Gone Girl' close No. 2

Amazing Amy has a new foe to reckon with this weekend. Universal and Legendary’s Dracula Untold (Cinema Score: A-) edged out Gone Girl for the No. 1 spot, Friday. Starring Luke Evans as the classic bloodsucker, Dracula Untold took in around $8.9 million, Friday (including Thursday showings), while David Fincher’s Gone Girl earned an estimated $8.15 million. It could be a tight race to No. 1, but tracking suggests that Gone Girl may end up the victor with $26 or $27 million this weekend and a $3 million lead over Dracula.

READ FULL STORY

Critical Mass: The jury weighs in on 'The Judge'

Stanley Kubrick believed that casting was 80 percent responsible for the failure or success of a film. Put the right actor—not necessarily the best actor—in the right role, and everything has a way of falling into place. The Judge is a father-son courtroom drama featuring a Jaded Lawyer and an Ornery Coot, and it would be difficult to imagine better choices than Robert Downey Jr., who produced the film with his wife, and Robert Duvall.

Downey, in his first real drama since 2009’s The Soloist, “plays the closest thing to a real human being he’s tackled in ages,” writes EW’s critic Chris Nashawaty. “As hotshot Chicago attorney Hank Palmer, Downey is his usual onscreen type—the whip-smart wiseass who’s cynical and selfish… until he’s not.”

Hank is called home for his mother’s funeral, and forced to revisit the scarred relationship he had with his irascible father, an esteemed judge who then finds himself on the wrong end of a murder trial. With his father facing a guilty verdict, Hank insists on leading his legal defense, even as the two men re-fight the battles that have kept them apart for 20 years.

His relationship with the Judge isn’t the only one that Hank has to rebuild. Vera Farmiga plays an old hometown girlfriend that he left behind, and Vincent D’Onofrio and Jeremy Strong play his two brothers.

Read more from EW’s review, as well as a roundup of other notable critics, below. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Gone Girl' gets some fresh competition

Robert Downey Jr., Dracula, and a cute, unlucky family have all come out to challenge Gone Girl and Annabelle‘s box office reign this weekend.

David Fincher’s popular psychological thriller could hold down the top spot for the second weekend in a row, with that demon doll close behind, but it’s going to be a tight race with The Judge, Dracula Untold, and Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. The adultery thriller Addicted also opens in around 800 locations, and there’s a slew of great limited release choices debuting too, including the buzzy Sundance sensation Whiplash.

Here’s how things might play out.

READ FULL STORY

First look: Dax Shepard in 'The Judge' and 'This Is Where I Leave You'

In between his work on the final season of Parenthood and writing the script for his upcoming CHiPs remake, Dax Shepard stayed busy, shooting The Judge and This Is Where I Leave You at the same time. Playing a young lawyer alongside Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall in one, and a jerk radio host alongside Jason Bateman and Tina Fey in the other, Shepard didn’t originally plan on starring in either of the films. But after one email and a few auditions for The Judge and one favor and a table read for This Is Where I Leave You, Shepard suddenly found himself starring in what he claims is one of the best scripts he’s ever read, for The Judge, and in one of the most highly anticipated adaptations of the year, for This Is Where I Leave You.

EW has an exclusive first look at Shepard in both films. Below, read a conversation with him about landing the roles, being punched by Tina Fey, and more.

EW: Your hair in this Judge photo is just amazing.
DAX SHEPARD:
It was an exercise in breaking my vanity, getting in those suits that didn’t fit and parting my hair on the side. It was rough, but I got through it.

But it was good. I had a similar experience to playing The Judge—this is such a terrible story. But I’m so into cars; especially from where I’m from in Detroit, your car is everything. It’s who you are. In high school, that’s all you care about is what car you drive, and then the second I made $5, I made sure I got a car I loved. One time went to a film festival in Austin, and I borrowed a friends really old rusted-out piece-of-s–t Toyota, and it broke several times on the way to the festival, and then I went inside and we had the screening. When I came out, some people from the screening followed me to get some pictures and autographs and whatnot. And I got into this old jalopy, rusted up Toyota, and I could feel that my ego was very affected by the experience, and then I thought, “I should probably buy one of these and drive it for two years just to really get myself under control.” And I felt like parading through Boston [for The Judge], looking like that, was also very constructive in some way.

So it helped you as a person.
Yes. Generally speaking, I don’t have a great self-image, so if I can be in an outfit I like, that certainly helps. So I didn’t have any of my go-to weapons.

And you’re standing in a room with Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall.
F—ing tough. Tough business. If every photo you’re in in a movie is standing next to Robert [Downey Jr.], it’s rough on the self-esteem.

So how did you get involved in The Judge?
I had a nine-hour flight home, and I read I think four scripts on the plane. It’s really hard to read that fourth script if you’ve just read three. It’s not my favorite format for literature by far, so by the time I got to the fourth script I was like “Oh god, here we go, I gotta get through this last one. It’s a goal I set on this flight.”

And then the fourth one was The Judge, and it just was if not the best script I’ve ever read, definitely in the top three, and I’ve been reading them now for 12 years pretty regularly. I just was so blown away with this script that when I landed. I had a layover in Seattle and I can still see where I was seated in the terminal. I emailed Susan Downey, who I know personally, and I just wrote her an email saying like, “I’m so happy for you guys that you have this script, it’s just beautiful and I would love to be a waiter in this thing or cross in the background as an extra. I just would love in any way to be associated with such a great script.” And she said, “Oh, great, I’ll set up a meeting for you and [director David] Dobkin.” She didn’t laugh at me for being interested. A

I got home and I met with Dobkin, we had lunch, and we had crossed paths a few times over the years for different things he’s made, and then he said, “Yeah, you can audition to play that lawyer.” That’s who I kind of gravitated towards. I think my agents had said to me to try to chase one of the brother roles, but I just really thought I had a take on this really eager, kind of nice, naive lawyer, so I went and read for the casting director—then to my shock, Dobkin really, really loved it. Then I went and read for him one more time and[there was] like a three- or four-week period where it looked like I was gonna get it, but at the same time, I wasn’t getting an offer, so it was an emotional roller coaster. Ultimately I did get it, which was very rewarding, and Robert [Dowey Jr.] called me personally to say, “You’re going to do this movie with us.”

He called you?
Yeah. It was pretty spectacular. And I was shooting [The Judge and This Is Where I Leave You] at the exact same time, so I was flying back and forth between New York and Boston being both those characters: one an outspoken, arrogant douchebag, and the other a humble, nice, sweet lawyer.

So how would you describe your character in The Judge? I read that he was sort of the comic relief in a way.
Not in the sense that I make jokes. It’s not a comedic role, but it’s so opposite of Robert’s character. It is the polar opposite, and so I think just seeing me be just so contradictory to him is really funny. It’s certainly not played as a comedic role by design. But it does come off as very funny. He’s so confident and sharp and cunning, and then I’m just so from-the-heart and naive that, yeah, the execution ends up being pretty funny. But it certainly wasn’t ever playing the comedy of it.

How is it that your character gets pulled into the case?

So Duvall, who is a long-standing judge in this small town, has seen many lawyers come through his courtroom and what he values most is character. That’s what he puts the ultimate prize on. And in fact, there’s a moment where Downey asks him who the best attorney he ever saw was—and he wasn’t an F. Lee Bailey type who had won the case; he’d actually just taken a case that he knew was going to ostracize him from the community and he did it anyways because it was the right thing to do, so that’s where Duvall’s priorities lie. So he hires me, who he knows is a very, very good man, and within five seconds of kind of cross-examining me in my office, Downey realizes that this is going to be a major disaster, which it quickly is.

Dax-Shepard-02.jpg

Switching gears to playing a not-so-good man in This Is Where I Leave You: Had you read the book before you got the role?
I had not. This was nearly the opposite experience from what I had on The Judge. The Judge, I knew I was auditioning, I was rehearsing a ton, and I knew it inside and out when we started. This, I got a call basically saying as a favor to Shawn Levy who I also know, “Will you come to this table read on a Saturday morning at Warner Brothers?” And I said “Absolutely.”

I went, and there wasn’t really any talk of me doing the movie because I knew I was already doing The Judge and that was going to be in Boston, and I also was during a portion of that going to be filming Parenthood, so I knew those two schedules were already at odds. So I went to this table read just as like, “Yeah I’ll go hang out with my friends Jason [Bateman] and Tina [Fey] and then I’ll do a favor to Shawn.” Then I did this table read and shortly thereafter, I went on vacation with my whole family and we were in Utah and I got a call that was, “You need to be on a plane in two days if you want to be in This is Where I Leave You.” And I was like “Oh my gosh, how is that going to work?” And they said since it’s the same studio, now all of a sudden it’s going to be easy to schedule. Suffice it to say I left vacation, and two days later I was in New York shooting the scene where I get punched by Tina Fey.

Which was obviously the highlight of the experience.
Uh, yeah. Yeah. As luck would have it, I think I shot their first two days of filming and then I went and shot their last two days of filming, so there was a good seven weeks in between when I worked.

Let me back up: When I got the call to say, “Do you want to do This Is Where I Leave You starting in two days?” my first question was, “When is that naked scene? I’ve been on vacation pretending I was at the Nathan’s hotdog eating contest for six days, there’s no way I’m screen-ready for a naked scene.” So luckily, that was on the back of the schedule and I said, okay, I guess I have seven weeks to get my s–t together. I was still working through all the compassionate weight I put on during Kristen’s [Bell] first pregnancy, so luckily I had a good enough window that I was able to get back in shape to be naked. I feel a certain obligation to look okay when they hire you to be naked.

There’s also been times where I felt it was my responsibility to gain 40 pounds for a movie too, so it’s not all vanity-driven. But in this case I certainly thought the guy who’s emasculating [Bateman] should be in pretty good shape.

In the book, your character gets a lit cake shoved somewhere you don’t want a lit cake shoved. Were you at all intimidated that they were going to try and do that?
Well, that was another sticky point. Yeah, I did not want a cake shoved up my ass. It was already a dicey proposition to take a role where you destroy the very lovable Jason Bateman’s life, so I was already a little hesitant to be that guy—and then add getting a cake stuck up my ass, that was kind of a dealbreaker. But luckily, that didn’t end up being in the movie. That’s something you can definitely do in a book, but I think if you start a movie where in the first five minutes, you watch a man put a cake up another man’s ass, that’s a hard hard level to maintain for another two hours. I think Sean rightly realized that would be a pace he was setting that just maybe wasn’t maintainable, tonally speaking.

Did you enjoy getting to play the lesser-loved character?
Yeah. Well, what I really enjoyed was that the movie opens with me doing my radio show, and that was really, really fun because what is in the movie is five or six improvised rants kind of edited together. And I got to vocalize a side of my ego that I would probably never say out loud in public but some thoughts I actually do have. So that was really fun, to kind of unleash that side of myself, which probably we all have that we are smart enough not to say out loud. That was actually really fun.

This Is Where I Leave You arrives in theaters Sept. 19, followed by The Judge on Oct. 10.

'The Judge' to open Toronto International Film Festival

It looks like a big year for Robert Downey, Jr., and not just in terms of profit.

The Toronto International Film festival announced today that David Dobkin’s The Judge, which stars the Iron Man actor, will open the festival on September 4. The film follows big-city lawyer Hank Palmer (Downey) as he returns to his childhood home, where his estranged father (Robert Duvall)—the town’s judge—is suspected of murder. Vera Farmiga, Vincent D’Onofrio, Jeremy Strong, Dax Shepard, and Billy Bob Thornton also star.

READ FULL STORY

In 'The Judge' trailer, Robert Downey Jr. proves you can go home again -- VIDEO

We’ve seen complicated father-son relationships on the big screen before, but Robert Duvall and Robert Downey Jr. offer a new perspective on an old story in The Judge.

Downey plays fast-and-loose defense attorney Hank Palmer, who heads home when his mom dies only to stick around to defend his dad, small-town judge Joseph Palmer (Duvall), in a murder case.

“His father is a pillar of the community. Everybody knows a dad like the judge,” Downey told EW’s Anthony Breznican earlier this month. “Every community has one, and every family has either heard of or been under that kind of patriarchy. It’s this very American story. But it’s also a story about family, and reconciliation, and law, and justice.”

The all-star cast also includes Billy Bob Thornton, Vera Farmiga, Vincent D’Onofrio, and Leighton Meester. Take a look at the first trailer, which Downey posted on Twitter, below: READ FULL STORY

'The Judge': Robert Downey Jr. fights the law, and his father -- FIRST LOOK

How do you defend someone who never defended you? That’s the heart of this thriller/family drama (out Oct. 10) starring Robert Downey Jr. as a Chicago defense attorney who returns to his small town to represent his hostile father (Robert Duvall) in a murder case.

Duvall plays the imperious title character: a living symbol of justice in their community and a tyrant in his own household — factors that compelled his son to flee years before. A family funeral brings Downey’s character home, but it’s another death that keeps him there.

“Against his own instincts and desire, he ends up staying to defend his dad from what may or may not be an intentional vehicular manslaughter case,” Downey says, flashing his eyebrows on those last few words. READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Cillian Murphy to go 'In the Heart of the Sea' with Ron Howard; Plus, Sandra Bullock will not join 'Annie', more

• Cillian Murphy, best known for his work with Christopher Nolan in Inception and the Dark Knight movies, has joined the cast of Ron Howard’s In the Heart of the Sea. Based on the Nathaniel Philbrick novel about the whale ship Essex, Murphy will play the role of Matthew Joy, the second mate aboard the doomed ship. Chris Hemsworth (Thor) also stars. Murphy is currently filming Transcendence, and recently wrapped Cry/Fly with Jennifer Connelly and Mélanie Laurent. [Deadline]

READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Zoe Saldana in talks for 'Guardians of the Galaxy'; Plus, Brad Pitt, Nicholas Hoult, Leighton Meester, more

 It’s looking like Zoe Saldana will join another intergalactic franchise. The Avatar and Star Trek actress is in talks to play the female lead in Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy. She would join a cast that already features Chris Pratt (Zero Dark Thirty) and mixed martial artist Dave Bautista. Saldana is in negotiations to play Gamora, who, in the comic books, is the sole survivor of her humanoid race, the Zen Whoberi. She’s known as “the deadliest woman in the whole galaxy.” Also of note: Gamora has a stint in the comic books as a minion and adopted daughter of sorts of Thanos — that purple-skinned alien which the closing credits of The Avengers seemed to set up as our heroes’ next arch-rival. Perhaps this is further reason to hope for some more franchise cross-overs in Marvel’s future? [THR] READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP