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Tag: The Skeleton Twins (1-5 of 5)

'Skeleton Twins' director: Kristen Wiig, Bill Hader really are like siblings

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Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader play a pair of estranged siblings who are reconnected at a particularly dark moment for both in the Sundance drama The Skeleton Twins. And, when a depressed Milo (Hader) leaves Los Angeles to live with a similarly depressed Maggie (Wiig) and her earnest, goofy husband (Luke Wilson), it’s not exactly a seamless homecoming, with fights, lies, and past traumas weighing on the once-inseparable twins throughout.

But writer-director Craig Johnson didn’t cast two of today’s most likable comedians to just destroy them with melodrama. There are moments of pure joy, too, including a standout sequence, teased in the trailer, where Milo and Maggie break into a cheesy ’80s classic to ease a particularly tense moment. As Owen Gleiberman wrote after the film’s Sundance premiere, “This is a tenderly sincere, and smart, and beguiling, and penetrating movie about the way that ordinary messed-up people can wind up stumbling through their lives.”

EW spoke to Johnson about directing Hader and Wiig and how that whole Starship sequence came together.

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Sundance 2014: With tons of movies sold, the lack of a mega deal was no big deal

I can testify that when you go to a film festival, and someone inquires about how the movies were that year, the answer you end up giving — “Really terrific!” “Lousy!” “They were okay!” — is often dictated by exactly one movie. If you saw something that totally knocked you out, the sort of film that you think is going to get major play in the real world, and you’re already dusting off a place on your 10 Best list for it, then that¬†one movie can determine your entire perception of the festival. That’s what happened to me last year at Sundance when I saw Fruitvale (they hadn’t added the Station yet). The fact that you’ve witnessed a certified home run makes the festival feel to you, in hindsight, like…well, a baseball game in which your team hit a home run. It’s more than a good movie; it’s why you came — to see an unheralded filmmaker knock one out of the park. A single movie that rocks your world can define, year in and year out, the Sundance experience — the reason that a festival like this one exists. Some of the films I’ve seen at Sundance that have had that effect include Crumb (1995), Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995), I Shot Andy Warhol (1996), Buffalo 66 (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Chuck & Buck (2000), Wet Hot American Summer (2001), American Splendor (2003), Capturing the Friedmans (2003), Thirteen (2003), Hustle & Flow (2005), Precious (2009), and Fruitvale (2013). READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Bill Hader talks 'Skeleton Twins' and his Bond-villain dream -- VIDEO

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At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, Saturday Night Live alum Bill Hader is one-half of the Skeleton Twins. The other half is a familiar face: His fellow SNL vet Kristen Wiig.

Hader and director/writer Craig Johnson talk about the sibling drama, and how Hader would be (almost) perfect as Daniel Craig’s next foe, in the interview with EW’s Anthony Breznican below:
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Sundance 2014: Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader are fantastic in 'The Skeleton Twins'

Going in to the first Sundance showing of The Skeleton Twins, in which Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader play a troubled sister and brother coping with the legacy of their screwed-up family, I knew nothing about the film except that it was being billed as the movie that reunited the two former SNL teammates but wasn’t a comedy. Glancing at that photo above, I thought to myself: Hmmmmm, I hope it’s not one of those glum dysfunctional-family indie specials in which gifted comedians blank themselves out for the sake of art. I needn’t have worried. The Skeletons Twins is very much a drama, but it has lots of laughs, too — the kind of good, soul-ticking laughs that emerge, organically, from dramatic situations. Its tone is comparable to that of The Kids Are All Right or Alexander Payne’s films. The Golden Globes would have no problem nominating The Skeleton Twins in the Best Comedy or Musical category. Yet as directed and co-written by Craig Johnson, this is a tenderly sincere, and smart, and beguiling, and penetrating movie about the way that ordinary messed-up people can wind up stumbling through their lives. And let me say right up front: The two actors are fantastic together, every bit as powerful as Laura Linney and Mark Ruffalo were as the woundedly bound siblings of You Can Count on Me. But then, we already know from Bridesmaids what a knockout of a leading lady Kristen Wiig can be. It’s Bill Hader who’s the revelation. I think he could become a major screen actor. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Bill Hader can count on Kristen Wiig in 'The Skeleton Twins' -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader spent seven years together on Saturday Night Live, so when you hear they’re starring in a movie together — playing twins no less — you might expect it to be an outrageous comedy. When you then hear it’s also a Sundance movie, you might conclude that it’s something quirky-funny like Adventureland, the 2009 festival hit in which they played the married couple that runs a rinky-dink amusement park. But The Skeleton Twins is something entirely different — a full-on drama. They play Maggie and Milo, twins who used to be close but now live on different sides of the country. Neither is particular happy with their lives, and when they both narrowly avoid death on the same day, they end up reuniting and confronting the issues that have kept them apart. “Yeah, I would say it’s the Nebraska route,” says Hader, referring to the toned-down performance by his former SNL colleague, Will Forte, in Alexander Payne’s recent movie. “It’s more dramatic than funny. The movie I can compare it to is You Can Count On Me.”

Hader filmed the movie during his final season of Saturday Night Live, a hectic time in his life that had him plumbing some pretty hard-core emotional depths on Skeleton Twins and then racing back to Studio 8H to do a sketch with a guest like Jamie Foxx or perform on Weekend Update as Stefon. “I always liked it when you’d see someone [from SNL] do something different,” he says. “I’m not comparing myself at all to Bill Murray, but I remember seeing Bill Murray in Mad Dog and Glory. I was like, ‘Wow, he was really scary in this.’ That’s so cool that he did that. Beating up Robert DeNiro? It was crazy. I thought that was so awesome.”

Before the 35-year-old actor heads back to the Sundance Film Festival — a special place for him and his wife, Maggie Carey, since they got engaged in Park City — Hader discussed working with Wiig on The Skeleton Twins and the scene that sent him to the emergency room. READ FULL STORY

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