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Tag: Toronto Film Festival (1-10 of 125)

Scarlett Johansson debuts new look, terrifies in 'Under the Skin' trailer -- VIDEO

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The official trailer for Under The Skin starring Scarlett Johansson has been released, offering audiences a glimpse of the actress as a brunette (really!) with a Scottish accent in writer-director Jonathan Glazer’s newest sci-fi offering.

Under The Skin –an adaptation of the Michael Farber novel of the same name – features Johansson as a human-eating alien in bombshell disguise who preys on the unwitting men of Scotland. And in the spooky full-length trailer, Johansson’s sex appeal is on full-display as she slinks in and out of water in a black bra and panty set, delivering lines like “Come to me,” while in another scene the 29-year-old coos “When was the last time you touched someone?”

Nonetheless, the film – which premiered at the Telluride Film Festival last summer – promises to fully terrify movie goers when it hits theaters April 4. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

'Under the Skin' trailer: Scarlett Johansson is one sexy alien -- VIDEO

Jonathan Glazer’s sci-fi thriller Under the Skin, which was picked up by A24 Films at this month’s Toronto Film Festival, stars Scarlett Johansson as a human-eating alien who specializes (not surprisingly) in seduction.

The trailer for the film shows Johansson put on her red lipstick and pick up what we have to assume is one of her victims. But what follows isn’t as easy to decipher. As all dialogue fades out about halfway through the trailer, we watch as things seem to spin out of control. See what you can make out of the trailer for Under the Skin, Glazer’s first film since 2004′s Birth: READ FULL STORY

WikiLeaks leaks 'The Fifth Estate' script, rips 'work of fiction masquerading as fact'

When The Fifth Estate, Bill Condon’s movie about WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, premiered at the Toronto Film Festival earlier this month, virtually every member of the cast and crew who walked the red carpet was playfully asked whether they suspected Assange himself had somehow hacked into the screening and was watching the film from a secure location. Assange, who’d already publicly denounced the project, remained mostly silent as it debuted in Toronto. Well, not anymore. In a tweet sent yesterday, WikiLeaks said, “As WikiLeaks was never consulted about the upcoming Hollywood film on us, we’ve given our advice for free: It’s bad.”

Linked to the tweet, WikiLeaks posted what it calls a “mature version” of Josh Singer’s’s Fifth Estate screenplay, along with an extensive memo that calls the movie “irresponsible, counterproductive and harmful.” While the movie depicts Assange righteously exposing American secrets, including the names of government informants around the globe, WikiLeaks denies that anyone was harmed and refers to the U.S. government’s own case against Assange as evidence. According to WikiLeaks, the film “is a work of fiction masquerading as fact” that was based on two outdated books written by people with personal or legal grudges against WikiLeaks. “These authors had an interest in portraying Julian Assange as dishonest or manipulative for competitive, personal and legal reasons,” WikiLeaks said in its memo. “It is hard to imagine how a film which aims to dramatise only their version of events could genuinely aspire to being fair or accurate.” READ FULL STORY

Toronto: 'Once' director John Carney explains how he cast 'Can a Song Save Your Life?'

Once, the 2007 Oscar-winning movie about the musical connection between a broken-hearted Dublin busker and a piano-playing Czech immigrant, was one of those rare movies whose charm couldn’t be bottled in a critic’s blurb or even explained in a full review. You just had to see it to fully understand how a simple story with simple characters could make you, the audience, feel wonderful and alive and believe wholeheartedly that a song could save your life. That movie starred Glen Hansard, the lead singer of the Irish band the Frames, and his ex-bandmate John Carney directed the film.

Six years later, Carney brought a new film to the Toronto Film Festival last week, and though he insists he intended to do something quite different than Once, there’s no denying that Can a Song Save Your Life? aims to strike a similar chord. Keira Knightley plays a sensitive songwriter whose musical partner and boyfriend (Adam Levine) is about to become famous because a few of his songs were in a hit movie. As his fame tears them apart, she wallows in despair at a New York open-mic night, where she’s “discovered” by a desperate A&R man (Mark Ruffalo) who is looking for anything to cling to. Like in Once, the creative process of making music is cinematic alchemy, and the two drifting souls eventually have to decide where — and with whom — they really belong.

When Can a Song Save Your Life? premiered last weekend in Toronto, where it was seeking a distribution deal, audiences — and buyers — were immediately entranced. Harvey Weinstein cornered Carney at the film’s post-premiere party and wouldn’t let their conversation end until the director made a deal with The Weinstein Company. The next day, TWC announced its $7 million acquisition (and a $20 million advertising commitment), guaranteeing that Can a Song Save Your Life? will play in theaters across the country when it opens, most likely in 2014. Carney spoke to EW about the music business, casting judges from The Voice, and what it’s like to get the hard-sell from someone like Harvey Weinstein.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: I suspect this movie will evoke a very similar audience reaction to Once, because these fragile characters also connect through their shared love of music. Where did this story begin for you?
JOHN CARNEY: I was thinking about what part of my life I could mine, and I felt that it would be fun to look back at A&R guys, who were always sort of looking for the next big thing. I was in a band after I left school, and I guess the ’90s were really that last hurrah of A&R craziness, with coke habits and five-star hotels and unlimited credit cards and stuff like that. I thought it would be interesting to see where those guys are now, now that the music industry has changed so much. The idea of an A&R man discovering an act and what discoveries are left and what does fame sort of mean anymore were some of the themes I wanted to talk about in this movie. What I liked about the conflict between Keira and Ruffalo in the film, which I hope people are seeing, is what does an old-school A&R man do with a young talent who genuinely doesn’t want the limelight?

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'12 Years a Slave' wins Toronto People's Choice Award

Apparently Toronto audiences agree that 12 Years a Slave is the one to watch this awards season: The Steve McQueen-directed film, starring Brad Pitt and Chiwetel Ejiofor, won the People’s Choice Award at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.

After seeing 12 Years in Toronto, EW film critic Owen Glieberman called it a “landmark of cruelty and transcendence,” while our awards expert Anthony Breznican declared Oscar nominations a “certainty.” The movie hits theaters Oct. 18.

Among the other TIFF awards:
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Toronto: The sad, tragic story of the homeless-man scene-stealer in Nicolas Cage's movie, 'Joe'

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It’s not every day that a homeless person gets to star in a movie opposite an Oscar winner. In David Gordon Green’s dark Southern gothic indie, Joe, Nicolas Cage stars as a good-intentioned but self-destructive ex-con who can’t resist helping his dirt-poor protege, Gary (Mud‘s Tye Sheridan), the product of a broken home. The desperate teen turns to Cage’s Joe for a job, and when the kid shows up the first day with his dear-ol’ dad in tow, it’s apparent to Joe that Gary is in a hopeless situation.

Gary’s father, Wade, is an alkie degenerate who’s quickly fired for his laziness, but it soon becomes clear that it’s not safe to turn your back on him. He beats Gary for his day’s earnings, he pimps out his own daughter for booze money, and woe to the fellow drunk who’s savoring one last sip in his bottle when Wade craves a toot. It’s a haunting portrayal of ugliness and depravity from an actor you’ve never seen before but will likely have a hard time forgetting.

Gary Poulter was living on the streets of Austin, Tex., when a casting director recruited him to audition for Joe. He’d never really acted before, and decades of addiction had laid waste to his appearance, if not his spirit. “He just had this personality and charisma that you can’t find, that you can’t access with an actor who hasn’t lived it,” says Green. “There’s a look in his eye and a texture of his skin, and he’s missing half an ear. There’s just some beautiful qualities in him that for our purposes, brought out an authenticity of the role.”

At the Toronto Film Festival this week, Green and his two Hollywood stars were present after screenings to take bows and answer questions about Joe. Gary Poulter, however, wasn’t there to bask in the applause that he certainly deserved. He wasn’t back in Austin either, trying to find a safe shelter to spend the night. Gary Poulter was dead. READ FULL STORY

Toronto 2013 Deal Report Update: A24 grabs Jake Gyllenhaal's 'Enemy,' and more

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As the Toronto Film Festival winds down this weekend, we’ve rounded up a list of the deals coming out of the annual fest. For a complete look at all the deals, combine this list with our first deal report of the week. Here’s what’s happened since:

A24 is close to gaining the U.S. distribution rights to Jake Gyllenhaal’s Enemy, which also stars Melanie Laurent and Sarah Gadon and tells the story of a history professor who sees his double in a film and decides to track him down. It’s based on an adaptation of ose Saramago’s novel The Double. [Variety]

Roadside Attractions has acquired U.S. rights to Fred Schepisi’s romance, Words and Pictures, which stars Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche as a writer struggling with losing his talent and an artist struggling with her body’s abilities (or lack thereof).
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Toronto 2013: Do we need a West Memphis Three drama even if it's good?

Devil’s Knot, a docudrama about the tangled and still-loaded West Memphis Three case, directed by Atom Egoyan, is for the most part a tense and absorbing movie. It’s the intelligent, detail-jammed, well-executed version of what we used to call “a TV movie” — a phrase you can’t really use anymore, since it once connoted a certain second-rate, connect-the-dots Madame Tussauds biopic quality that’s become irrelevant in the age of HBO. (There was never a “TV movie” like Behind the Candelabra or Recount.) Yet that term also summoned up the basic, childlike voyeuristic appeal of seeing interesting actors inhabit the roles of tabloid figures — celebrities, criminals, or both — who get famous for unspeakable behavior. Be honest: Wouldn’t you like to see a down-and-dirty TV movie about the Casey Anthony case? (Actually, there was one, but it was awful. I say: Cast Emily Blunt now!) And the West Memphis Three case, though it’s been dealt with in the media for years as — rightly — a dead-serious episode of egregious injustice, remains, at its dark heart, a river of homicidal mystery boiling with undertows of evil. READ FULL STORY

Toronto: 'We live in a Rumsfeld world,' says Errol Morris

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Ten years ago, filmmaker Errol Morris sat down to interview Robert S. McNamara, the Secretary of Defense who’d molded the country’s Vietnam War policies in the 1960s, for the Oscar-winning documentary, The Fog of War. McNamara, one of the “best and brightest” minds from the Kennedy Administration, had come to regret some of his decisions, and his expansive conversation with Morris, conducted through an Interrotron camera that allows the subject to look directly into the eyes of the audience, became a cautionary tale at a time when the country was revving up its war machine to take down Saddam Hussein in Iraq following the terrorist attacks on 9/11.

One of the primary architects of that 2003 military campaign was Donald Rumsfeld. Rumsfeld had been the youngest Secretary of Defense in U.S. history when he held the position under Gerald Ford in the 1970s, and he became the oldest Secretary when he joined George W. Bush’s cabinet in 2001. Rumsfeld was formidable, intimidating, and imperious, and his press conferences were grand theater in which he made immediately infamous statements like, “You go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time,” and, in reference to the existence of Iraqi WMDs, “The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, or vice versa.”

Especially when the Iraqi War got ugly — “Stuff happens,” Rumsfeld said — and photos of the prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib were splashed on front pages around the world in 2004, Rumsfeld became the face of America’s controversial policies in the Middle East. He resigned in 2006, but he remains unwavering in his beliefs that the government did what it needed to do. There is no fog in Rumsfeld’s war.

Morris was surprised when Rumsfeld agreed to speak with him at all and even more surprised when he sat for 33 hours of on-camera interviews over the course of a year. The filmmaker calls those exchanges “one of the most difficult series of interviews that I’ve ever done.”

Morris spoke to EW at the Toronto Film Festival, where The Unknown Known screened.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How does one begin to court Donald Rumsfield for a project like this? Not why, but how?
ERROL MORRIS: I wrote him a letter. I’d become aware of all of his memos — called yellow perils in the Ford Administration, snowflakes during the Bush Administration. And the idea of all these memos fascinated me. I contacted his attorney slash agent, Bob Barnett — he’s legendary. He sells most of these huge inside-the-beltway books. Bob Barnett told me, “Well, he’s never going to talk to you.” And I asked, “Well, will you forward a letter and a copy of The Fog of War?” He said he would. In the letter, I explicitly told Don Rumsfeld that I was not envisioning a Fog of War 2. I felt: different men, different set of historical circumstances, different issues. So I met with him in his offices — which was one of the more extraordinary events for me. You know, Rumsfeld coming to the door, introducing himself, saying, “Don Rumsfeld.” READ FULL STORY

Toronto: Daniel Radcliffe talks Harry Potter and the glee of watching the media fight

J.K. Rowling might be returning to the magical universe that gave rise to Harry Potter, but Daniel Radcliffe has never looked back since retiring his wand in 2011 — seemingly for good — after a decade playing The Boy Who Lived. In the last several years, Radcliffe has tackled a variety of eclectic parts that almost seemed designed to blow up our image of him as the iconic boy-wizard. There were his performances in the stage revival of Equus and then the song-and-dance Broadway hit, How to Succeed in Business…, and a starring turn in last year’s gothic horror film, The Woman in Black.

At this year’s Toronto Film Festival, the 24-year-old was its unofficial poster-boy, arriving with starring roles in three different — very different — films that demonstrated once again that Radcliffe isn’t afraid of venturing outside the box. In Kill Your Darlings, which premiered earlier this year at Sundance and opens in theaters Oct. 16, Radcliffe plays a college-aged Allen Ginsberg who falls in league with a spirited group of mesmerizing free-thinkers, led by Dane DeHaan’s Lucien Carr, a troubled soul who opens Ginsberg’s mind, body, and soul to new experiences. In Horns, based on Joe Hill’s macabre mystery novel, he plays a young man whose presumed guilt in a small-town murder seems to be manifested in the horns that suddenly sprout out of his forehead. And in The F Word, which was recently acquired by CBS Films, he proves that he can also deliver a straightforward romantic-comedy, playing a relatively normal guy who settles for being best friends — friends being the F-word in the movie’s title — with the girl he loves, played by Zoe Kazan. “It’s that rarest of things,” says Radcliffe. “It’s a really cheerful, happy film without being sentimental.”

The Brit sat down with EW to discuss his new movies, what it’s like to be the actor who used to be Harry Potter, and his upcoming role in Frankenstein.
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