Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Sienna Miller talks about the ending of 'American Sniper,' Bradley Cooper’s short shorts

American-Sniper

Sienna Miller doesn’t want to talk about whether or not Bradley Cooper dies in the end.

In the upcoming biopic American Sniper, he portrays Chris Kyle, the deadliest marksman in U.S. military history. During Kyle’s four tours in Iraq, the decorated Navy SEAL had 160 confirmed kills before retiring in 2009. But his life abruptly ended in 2013 when he was shot by a Marine veteran reportedly suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. (He’s currently awaiting trial.)

When asked if that sad coda to Kyle’s legendary career is included in director Clint Eastwood’s adaptation of the soldier’s best-selling 2012 memoir, the British actress demures. “I’m not supposed to say anything,” says Miller, who portrays Kyle’s wife, Taya. “The film really focuses more on his life than on his death. That’s what I’m supposed to say.”

Hitting theaters in limited release on Christmas Day, American Sniper arrives as a late addition to the awards-season scrum with a growing din of sight-unseen prerelease buzz. Cooper—who also produced the film—packed on pounds of muscle for the part, practiced shooting live ammunition with real SEAL teams, and personally promised Kyle (just before his death) to do justice to his story.

As such, American Sniper showcases Kyle’s overseas deployments where his courage under fire and pinpoint accuracy earned him the nickname “Legend” (and, Kyle claimed in his memoir, put a bounty on his head from enemy insurgents). But the movie also follows its hero home from the battlefield.

“Ultimately, it is a war film,” Miller says. “At the same time, you have romance: humanity grounded by a love story. The dilemma of life at home. Leaving that high-adrenaline, high-intensity situation behind and trying to be a father and husband. This is a man whose priorities in life are God, country, and family—in that order.”

The movie appears set to follow a release pattern similar to Eastwood’s sports drama Million Dollar Baby, which hit screens in December 2004 and went on to win four Oscars. Various prognosticators are already placing short odds on Cooper, who’s earned two nominations in the past two years for American Hustle and Silver Linings Playbook.

“His performance is completely compelling. He’s just unrecognizable,” Miller says. “He was training four to six hours a day. He put on 40 pounds of muscle. He looked and sounded like a different person. I’m pretty sure he didn’t break character for the entire thing. He dived into this completely head-first. It was an amazing thing to be around.”

Amazing in a completely different way were a pair of butt-hugging khaki short shorts a bulked-up Cooper was photographed wearing on set that became an Internet meme earlier this year.

“We did have a laugh about those photos. Funnily enough, those are the SEALs’ Hell Week shorts,” says Miller, laughing. “They are the Navy SEALs’ training uniform. I guess it’s part of Hell Week to be humiliated to that degree.”

Casting Net: Naomi Watts, Elle Fanning, and Susan Sarandon board 'Three Generations'

• Naomi Watts, Elle Fanning, and Susan Sarandon have signed on for Three Generations. Gaby Dellal is directing the indie from a script by Nikole Beckwith. The story follows a New York City teen, Ray (Fanning), who is transitioning from female to male and her mother, Maggie (Watts), who must come to terms with Ray’s transition. Meanwhile, Maggie’s mother, Dolly (Sarandon), a music manager who lives with her lesbian partner, Frances, has trouble understanding Ray’s decision and Maggie’s inability to move out of the house she grew up in. Big Beach co-founders Peter Saraf and Marc Turtletaub will produce with InFilm Productions’ Dorothy Berwin. Watts will executive produce with Leah Holzer and Daniele Melia of Big Beach and Peter Pastorelli. Production for Three Generations begins in New York in early November. [THR]

• Jon Bernthal, Catalina Sandino MorenoÓscar Jaenada, and Mehdi Dehbi have been cast in the biopic The Godmother, which stars Catherine Zeta-Jones. The film tells the story of real-life Colombian cocaine queenpin Griselda Blanco. Eva Sørhaug is directing from a script by Frank Baldwin. Daniela Cretu is producing for First Born Films. Nicholas Pileggi is executive producing along with Nick Meyer, Marc Schaberg, and Kelly McCormick of Sierra/Affinity. Filming begins next spring, and Sierra/Affinity will take the film to international buyers at AFM next month. [Deadline]

• Julia Stiles and Ray Liotta have been cast in Anthony Hopkins‘ action-drama Go With Me. Set in a Pacific Northwest logging community, the story follows a young woman who endures harassment by a crime lord when she returns to her hometown. She looks to an ex-logger (Hopkins) and his sidekick for help. The story is based on the book by Castle Freeman Jr., which Joe Gangemi and Gregory Jacobs will adapt for the screen. Daniel Alfredson directs. Hopkins is producing with Rick Dugdale for Enderby Entertainment, Lindsay Williams and Ellen Goldsmith-Vein for the Gotham Group, and Gregory Jacobs. Shooting kicks off in British Columbia in mid-November. [Variety]

• Eva Longoria and Lily Collins are in talks for the untitled low-riders movie from Universal Pictures, Blumhouse, and Imagine Entertainment. The film reportedly stars Demian Bichir and takes place in the East LA street-culture world. Ricardo de Montreuil will direct from a script by Josh Bierne-Gordon and Justin Tipping, with Cheo Hodari Coker and Elgin James writing previous drafts. Imagine’s Brian Grazer will produce with Blumhouse’s Jason Blum. Kim Roth and Alexandre Dauman will oversee for Imagine, while Couper Samuelson will oversee for Blumhouse. [Deadline]

• Isla Fisher is joining Jon Hamm and Zack Galifianakis in the spy comedy Keeping Up With the Joneses. Galifianakis and Fisher will play a couple who discovers that they’re seemingly perfect new neighbors, one of which will be played by Hamm, are actually spies. Greg Mottola directs, Mike LeSieur wrote the script, and Walter Parkes and Laurie McDonald are producing. [The Wrap]

• Lucy Liu will take the lead in writer-director Evan Jackson Leong’s Snakehead. Set in New York, the drama stars Liu as a poor Chinese immigrant who, after being mentored by powerful bosses named Snakeheads, rises to the top of Chinatown’s human-smuggling business in an effort to reconnect with her daughter and family. 408 films is financing and producing in partnership with Arowana Films; 408’s Brian Yang, Gregory Chou, and E. Brian Dobbins and Principato-Young’s Allen Fisher are producing alongside Untitled’s Jason Weinberg and Frameworks’ Maryellen Mulcahy. Shooting kicks off this spring. [Deadline]

• Kunal Nayyar (The Big Bang Theory) will provide the voice for a dog in the live-action family drama A Bollywoof Tale. With Frederik Du Chau directing, the film tells the story of Basil, a pet spaniel who moves with his family from London to Dehli, but gets lost in Kolkata when his crate is misplaced. Basil pairs with Santoosh (voiced by Nayyar) and a cow named Uma to find his owners. Stephen Leslie wrote the script. Jason Newmark developed the project with the British Film Institute and is producing with Nisha Parti. The film will be shot in London and India in the first quarter of 2015. [THR]

• Gal Gadot will not take the female lead in Timur Bekmambetov‘s Ben Hur. The actress had been eyeing the role of Esther, Ben Hur’s love interest, but had to pass due to her Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice shooting schedule. Gadot portrays Wonder Woman in Zack Snyder‘s superhero flick and is set to appear in a handful of upcoming Warner Bros.’ Films, including a solo film in 2017. [The Wrap]

Box office preview: Jake Gyllenhaal's 'Nightcrawler' creeps into theaters

Halloween weekend is almost here, meaning one of two things: Horror fans will either flock to theaters or be too busy showing off their costumes in places more well-lit than cinemas.

Although next weekend begins the season of big movie weekends—Christopher Nolan’s much-anticipated Interstellar goes wide Nov. 7—this weekend is considerably smaller: Nightcrawler, a crime thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, is the only huge new release. And it will be facing off against Ouija, another Halloween-appropriate thriller that opened last weekend and might be helped by audiences’ appetites for scares on Oct. 31.

Before I Go to Sleep, a thriller starring Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth, is opening in 1,900 theaters this weekend (Nightcrawler will be playing in over 2,700 places) and is estimated to have a $5 million opening. For those looking for some nostalgia, though, the original Saw is making a quick comeback to theaters for its 10-year anniversary and should make about $2.5 million—not exactly the same as its $18.3 million opening weekend in 2004, but a solid turnout for a re-release.

Here are this weekend’s predictions. READ FULL STORY

The supernatural need not apply: 5 great examples of existential horror

The 1988 Dutch thriller The Vanishing hit Blu-ray this week, thanks to the good folks at Criterion. Without a drop of gore, it’s the perfect centerpiece for an All Saints’ Eve frightfest that shivers the soul but doesn’t turn the stomach. And why not round out that scare-a-thon with four more examples of great, relatively bloodless movies that go for your soul instead of your jugular? Here’s a list of suggestions. (And if you’re looking for more traditional horror flicks, consider perusing our carefully-curated Horror Quintessentials lists.) READ FULL STORY

Seth Rogen in talks to play Steve Wozniak in Steve Jobs biopic

Seth Rogen may soon have his big dramatic break, perhaps joining Aaron Sorkin’s upcoming Steve Jobs biopic, as Jobs’ Apple co-founder. A source confirmed to EW that Rogen is in talks to play Steve Wozniak. Sony had no comment.

READ FULL STORY

Chow Yun-Fat refuses to bow to Chinese boycott threats

Chow Yun-Fat, the Asian movie star best known in the U.S. for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Hard Boiled, is standing firm against a possible career backlash for lending support to the pro-democracy demonstrators in his native Hong Kong. Since September, students and others who make up Occupy Central With Love and Peace have gathered outside Chinese government headquarters and demanded electoral reform, and there have been repeated clashes with police.

Several other Hong Kong celebrities cautiously supported the protests, but according to reports, Chinese state-run media are trying to tamp down such public statements by threatening boycotts of artists’ film or music. Asian celebrities are being pressured to choose sides, but Chow hasn’t been easily cowed. In a response to the threat of being blacklisted, he told Hong Kong’s Next magazine that “I’ll just make less [movies] then,” according to The New York Times. READ FULL STORY

Get an exclusive first look at 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies'

Have you seen the Bennet sisters lately?

It might be time to get reacquainted with Jane Austen’s most famous family. Elizabeth (Lily James), Lydia (Ellie Bamber), Mary (Millie Brady), Jane (Bella Heathcote), and Kitty (Suki Waterhouse) aren’t just eligible singles anymore; they’re sword- and knife-wielding martial artists. READ FULL STORY

'The Babadook' director talks old-school horror

Horror directors these days seem to almost automatically genuflect before the altars of such ’70s and ’80s filmmakers as John Carpenter and Dario Argento. But writer-director Jennifer Kent sought inspiration from much older auteurs while crafting her debut film, the much-acclaimed, Sundance-screened, The Babadook. “I’ve watched everything, from Mario Bava to Dario Argento—all of those ‘70s guys, including John Carpenter, who I love,” she says. “But I feel very drawn also to the early stuff. There were directors in the ’20s and ’30s—Carl Dreyer, Fritz Lang—who were making films that were art and they just happened to be terrifying. I think somewhere along the way we denigrated the art form and horror really has become a dirty word. I think that’s a shame, because it’s really cinematic.”

READ FULL STORY

'Mockingjay' sets 2014 record for tickets sold on first day of presale

On Wednesday, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1 opened advance ticket sales and has already broken a 2014 record. According to a Fandango press release, Mockingjay sold more first-day advance tickets than any other 2014 film, passing the previous record-holder, Divergent. In its first day, Mockingjay accounted for 80 percent of Fandango’s daily ticket sales.

Over on Movietickets.com, the trend continued, with Mockingjay exceeding the first day advance sales of any other 2014 film, including Guardians of the GalaxyMockingjay also doubled the number of tickets sold on the first day of presales for Catching Fire last year. Sounds like the odds are in Mockingjay‘s favor.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1 hits theaters Nov. 21.

Paul Reubens confirms it: Pee-wee Herman is returning to the big screen

Pee-wee’s Big Adventure isn’t over just yet: Paul Reubens went on The Tonight Show Wednesday evening and confirmed another Pee-wee movie is in the works.

Reubens starred as the lovably weird Pee-wee Herman in the 1986 movie, Tim Burton’s first. He went on to reprise the role in Pee-wee’s Playhouse, a TV series that ran from 1986 to 1990 and featured appearances by now-famous actors like Black-ish’s Laurence Fishburne and Orange is the New Black‘s Natasha Lyonne. But now, he’s returning to the big screen. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP