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Tag: Behind the Candelabra (1-4 of 4)

Golden Globes: Party Report! Inside scoop from all the after-ceremony festivities

EW is inside all the Golden Globes parties tonight. Check out our reports from inside all the carousing and celebrating. Check back often for updates and follow us on Twitter at #EWglobes.
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Cannes 2013: 'Behind the Candelabra' is more than a dark Liberace kitschfest. It's a creepily moving love story

Behind the Candelabra, Steven Soderbergh’s backstage drama about Liberace, the fur-and-sequin-clad, ivory-tickling kitsch maestro of “wonderful” entertainment, and his relationship with Scott Thorson, the dewy hunk who became his romantic partner in the late 1970s, is a movie that I’ve been eager to see for many months. Nevertheless, when it was announced that the film wouldn’t just be playing at Cannes, but that it would be part of the hallowed roster of films shown in competition here, it raised my eyebrows.

Unless I’m mistaken, this is the first time that a movie set to premiere on American television — in this case, HBO — has been honored with a competition slot at Cannes. The festival, of course, has a long-term relationship with Soderbergh, going back to 1989, when sex, lies and videotape took the Palme d’Or. But it also struck me that the Cannes programmers were making a kind of cultural-political statement. Behind the Candelabra isn’t being released theatrically in the U.S. because, reportedly, no studio wanted a part of it — the word is that a number of executives thought it was “too gay” to be commercial. And let’s be clear: That’s insane. A movie about Liberace starring Michael Douglas and Matt Damon? It may not be Iron Man 3, but plenty of people, I’m convinced, would want to buy a ticket to see that. It’s hard to say what’s worse about the shunning of the movie by film studios: the implicit homophobia, or the insult to cinema. The Cannes programmers have obviously done their bit to right that wrong, and in doing so they have made a second statement as well. They have now acknowledged, from their perch of prestige, that “cinema” can thrive on TV. READ FULL STORY

Steven Soderbergh working on 12-hour adaptation of 'The Sot-Weed Factor'

Let’s just say Steven Soderbergh’s idea of retirement doesn’t include a lot of shuffleboard. The Oscar winning director, who has said that the Liberace biopic Behind the Candelabra (airing May 26 on HBO) will be his last conventional feature film for the time being, tells EW that he is now at work developing a 12-hour miniseries based on John Barth’s 1960 novel The Sot-Weed Factor.

“I’ve had this on my shelf for a while,” says Soderbergh. “I was going to do it as a movie, but I couldn’t figure it out. So now I’ve had it adapted as 12 one-hour episodes.” Set in the late 1600s, the satirical story follows an English poet who moves to Maryland to take over his father’s tobacco farm. A 1960 New York Times review of the book called it “a bare-knuckled satire of humanity at large” that is “so monstrously long that reading it seemed nearly as laborious as writing it.” In other words, this isn’t exactly The Da Vinci CodeREAD FULL STORY

Matt Damon on (maybe) returning to 'Bourne' and playing Liberace's lover in 'Behind the Candelabra'

Matt-Damon

When HBO airs Behind the Candelabra on May 26, the world will get to see Matt Damon play Liberace’s drug-addled, surgically enhanced lover — a role about as far from Jason Bourne as it gets.

But Damon, who sat down with costar Michael Douglas to talk with EW for this week’s cover story, says he isn’t ruling out a return to his blockbuster spy franchise despite the fact that he handed the reins over to Jeremy Renner in last year’s The Bourne Legacy. That movie rebooted the series by introducing the idea of a world with multiple Bourne-style secret agents — which means the original Jason Bourne could still be out there somewhere.

Tony Gilroy, who wrote the first one and the second one, came up with an idea: I think they look at it as kind of the reverse of X-Men,” says Damon, who opted not to sign on for a fourth film because he and director Paul Greengrass “couldn’t figure out” a script. “Whereas with X-Men, you get a giant bunch of superheroes and then do the Wolverine spinoff, I think Tony pitched it as, ‘OK, we started with the Wolverine spinoff. Now let’s try to make the X-Men. So I’ll create all these other programs, and you can have your evergreen that way. There’ll be other agents.'”

So does this mean Damon and Renner might share the screen in a Bourne movie someday? READ FULL STORY

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