Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Box Office (1-10 of 1089)

Box office preview: 'Guardians of the Galaxy' aims for a cosmic debut

The motley crew of rebels and mercenaries in Guardians of the Galaxy make their theatrical debut this weekend, and all signs point to a stellar opening. They might not be the most popular or well-known Marvel characters, but strong reviews and an even stronger marketing campaign have helped to drum up interest for these unlikely superheroes, which include an earthling (Chris Pratt), a talking raccoon (Bradley Cooper), and a tree (Vin Diesel). As the widest August release in history with a 4,080 screen launch, Guardians is tracking at $65 million, but many analysts think that it has the potential to earn much more.

The James Brown biopic Get On Up, starring Chadwick Boseman as the Hardest Working Man in Show Business, opens in 2,466 theaters this weekend, providing some much-needed alternative programming in this summer of superheroes and sequels.

Here’s how things might play out.

READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Lucy' slays 'Hercules' with $44 million debut

Hercules‘s muscles were no match for Lucy‘s drug-enhanced brain at the box office this weekend. Audiences turned out in earnest to see the Scarlett Johansson thriller, which earned an expectation-shattering $44 million from 3,173 theaters in its first weekend.

Not only is it director Luc Besson’s biggest opening, Lucy is also a career high for Scarlett Johansson as a lead. Audiences for the original feature were evenly split between genders, 35 percent were under the age of 25, and 29 percent were Hispanic. But even though the EuropaCorp-produced, Universal-distributed project appealed to a wide demographic swath, those who did see the R-rated action film were a little less kind in the exit polls, slapping Lucy with a poor C+ Cinema Score.

READ FULL STORY

Box-office update: 'Lucy' defeats 'Hercules' with $17.1 million Friday

Dwayne Johnson’s brawn was no match for Scarlett Johansson’s brain at the box office on Friday, as Johansson’s new action film Lucy took the top spot. With an estimated $17.1 million on Friday, Lucy may bring an unexpected boost to this year’s weak July box office and is now on track to pass its estimated $35 million opening, further cementing Johansson’s star power.

Though he definitely has a lot of power in his own way, Dwayne Johnson didn’t have enough strength as Hercules at the box office; Brett Ratner‘s poorly reviewed adaptation of Steve Moore’s 2008 graphic novel took in just $11 million on its first day out. However, the film started off strong internationally in 19 markets and still may do better than originally projected. Lucy won’t open internationally until next week.

The rest of the top five were all holdover summer sequels from previous weeks. Still monkeying around on 3000+ screens, last week’s top earner Dawn of the Planet of the Apes took the third place spot with an additional $4.7 million on Friday in its third week of release. The second film in the remade franchise is on track to cross the $170 million mark by the end of the weekend.

The Purge: Anarchy was still able to convince moviegoers to get their scare on with an estimated $3.4 million on Friday. However, the horror sequel is on track to see a 65-percent decline in sales for its second weekend in theaters.

And it looks like most parents and kids stayed home on Friday night, as Disney’s Planes: Fire and Rescue rounded out the top five with just $2.8 million on Friday. Also in its second week of release, the animated film will be aiming toward a $30 million domestic total this weekend.

Here’s the top five:

1. Lucy – $17.1 million Friday (new)
2. Hercules – $11 million Friday (new)
3. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes – $4.7 million Friday ($160.4M domestic total)
4The Purge: Anarchy — $3.4 million Friday ($44.8 million domestic total)
5.  Planes: Fire & Rescue – $2.8 million Friday ($28.58 million domestic total)

Check back in tomorrow for the full weekend report.

Box office preview: 'Lucy' aims to dominate 'Hercules'

Hercules might be a legendary warrior, but Lucy‘s brain capacity will likely prove too formidable a foe for the Greek demigod at the box office. The Scarlett Johansson-led action film looks poised to ravage Dwayne Johnson’s sword-and-sandals epic as both debut on 3,000+ screens this weekend.

Rob Reiner’s And So It Goes, starring Diane Keaton and Michael Douglas also opens in 1,800 theaters, which could possibly break the top five with $8 million, closing out a quiet and struggling July at the box office before Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy arrives next weekend.

Here’s how things might play out.

READ FULL STORY

5 things Hollywood learned about Latino moviegoers this summer

For kids in school, summer is typically spent catching up on reading lists and assigned homework between hours spent at the swimming pool and with friends at summer camp (not necessarily in that order). But many professionals working in the entertainment industry—whether as producers, journalists, actors, or producers—spent this summer learning about Latino moviegoers. (That’s largely thanks to an exclusive series on Hispanic film consumers published at TheWrap.)

From the growing importance of Hispanic females at the box office to the expanding movie preferences of Latino film fans, here are a few essential—takeaways about Hispanics that got Hollywood’s attention this summer.

1. Hispanic women over age 25 are the most frequent moviegoers. Summer films like Transformers: Age of Extinction, Godzilla and Captain America: The Winter Soldier are meant to capitalize on the appetites of young, mostly male audiences, but it turns out that Latina movie lovers headed to the movies more this summer often than any other age or ethnic group. According to a study conducted for The Wrap by market research firm C4, about 20 percent of Hispanic women watched this summer’s major releases—and in every case except for The Fault in Our Stars, those buying movie tickets were over the age of 25.

2. Hispanic audiences go to movies of all genres. Horror and family flicks used to be considered standard money makers among Latino audiences (the smash success of Guillermo del Toro’s Mama and the Lego movie were largely driven by Hispanic audiences). This summer, hits like 22 Jump Street (a comedy), Fault in Our Stars (a drama) and Edge of Tomorrow (a thriller) were all heavily attended by Latinos, who made up at least 20 percent of the opening week audience—proving that just like in political elections, their preferences aren’t monolithic.

3. Twenty is a magic number. When it comes to Hispanic movie lovers, that is. According to Nielsen/Univision research conducted for The Wrap, Latino ticket buyers are now Hollywood’s most valuable audience, accounting for at least 20 percent of ticket sales opening weekend for the highest-grossing movies in May and June. “You don’t have a major hit without Hispanic moviegoers,” Chris Aronson, Fox’s president of domestic distribution, told TheWrap.

And consider this: Latinos purchased 25 percent of the tickets sold in 2013 in the U.S. though they account for just 17 percent of the U.S. population, according to a study published by the Motion Picture Association of America last year. Those statistics are the driving force for a growing number of creative agencies that specialize in helping studios market films to Hispanic moviegoers, who tailor media campaigns to appeal to an audience that cares deeply about culture, family-friendly content, and Spanish-language media.

4. Tacos and margaritas now mean big money for cinemas. It’s no secret that overpriced popcorn and Big Gulp-sized drinks earn major dollars for movie theaters, but a diversified menu at the concession stand is a big draw for Latino moviegoers. Fajitas, chicken wraps, tacos, dishes spiced with chipotle peppers, and specialty cocktails are now available at AMC’s 15 dine-in theaters nationwide, part of an industry-wide push for diverse dining choices and alcohol offerings that aims to capitalize on the fact that Hispanic moviegoers overindex in their purchase of concessions and alcohol.

“Our dine-in theaters, while not specifically targeting a certain demo, have a seasonal menu that would line up closer to a Hispanic moviegoing population in terms of food,” AMC spokesman Ryan Noonan explained to TheWrap.

5. The Latino presence in film—both in front of the camera and behind the scenes—remains alarmingly low. Despite the presence of Latinos in summer films like like Sex Tape (starring Cuban-American actress Cameron Diaz) and The Purge: Anarchy (with its predominantly Latino cast), there are “fewer Latino lead actors in the entertainment industry today, than there were seventy years ago,” a recent study by the Columbia University Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race shows.

And it gets worse: When Latinos are on camera, they are typically portrayed in roles that lean heavily on stereotypes—Latinos are often cast as criminals, law enforcers, cheap labor, and hypersexualized beings, the study found. And according to the study, when it comes to behind-the-scenes talent, Hispanics account for just 2.3 percent of movie directors, about 2 percent of producers, and 6 percent of writers.

“The success of a few Latino stars has created a widespread perception that media diversity in the U.S. is significantly improving,” said Frances Negrón-Muntaner, director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and the study’s lead researcher in a statement. “But our findings indicate that, in some ways, it is getting worse.”

Summer box-office analysis: Hollywood is losing America, taking over the world

For this summer’s box office, the hits keep on coming—and not the good kind, the ones with $100 million opening weekends. No, the summer of 2014 has been one body-blow after another at the U.S. box office, as the collective slate of big Hollywood films has failed to keep up with last summer’s record pace. The most recent weekend, which witnessed Dawn of the Planet of the Apes repeat as the top movie, was trailing the same weekend last year by almost 25 percent. July is down more than 30 percent year-to-year, and the summer as a whole is down almost 19 percent from last year.

To be fair, the summer of 2013 was monstrous, with Iron Man 3 and Despicable Me 2 leading a parade of blockbusters that included 19 films that topped $100 million. This year, there have been only 10 films to hit that mark, though the season isn’t over yet, obviously. But as previously detailed, this summer might yield the worst box office in decades, with ticket sales down to disturbing levels. But why?

A simple and frequently cited explanation is that the current crop of movies stink. Give theatergoers something great, the conventional wisdom goes, and they’ll show up again and again. But what if the movies don’t stink? Or, more precisely, what if they stink the same amount as last year’s films? Then what? READ FULL STORY

Box-office report: 'Apes' counterattacks, 'Purge' taken down a peg

Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar’s… After a Friday night showdown that heavily tipped the scales in favor of the survival-horror thriller The Purge: Anarchy, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes came back strong this weekend to take the No. 1 spot at the box office.

The Apes sequel, starring motion-capture master Andy Serkis as the hyper-evolved higher primate named Caesar, collected $36 million for the weekend, according to Sunday estimates. Meanwhile, The Purge: Anarchy, a follow-up to last year’s nightmare-inducer about a 12-hour period when no crime is illegal, garnered only $28.3 million.

READ FULL STORY

Box-office update: 'Purge' beats 'Apes' with a $13 million Friday

The Apes don’t have chest-beating rights in the Friday box office, having surrendered their Darwinistic dominance to the apex predators of The Purge: Anarchy after only one week at the top.

The acclaimed sequel (of a reboot to a remake) Dawn of the Planet of the Apes collected $10.4 million last night in a rather precipitous 62 percent plunge from its $27.6 million debut last Friday, ceding the No. 1 slot to the survival-horror sequel The Purge: Anarchy, which transformed mayhem and savagery in the streets into a $13 million debut.

READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'Sex Tape' and 'The Purge,' 'Planes' sequels to threaten 'Apes'

Last weekend may have signaled a new Dawn for the Planet of the Apes franchise, as its latest film exceeded studio and analyst expectations with a $72.6 million debut. But Caesar and the gang face some formidable cross-genre competition this weekend, when Sex Tape, The Purge: Anarchy, and Planes: Fire & Rescue all hit theaters in wide release. With a steep drop-off expected for Apes and a lack of decent horror, family, and raunchy comedy fare on the market, all are tracking pretty similarly, making this summer weekend a rare box office wild card.

Here’s how things might play out:

READ FULL STORY

'Snowpiercer's' VOD gamble is paying off

Snowpiercer.jpg

Snowpiercer is undoubtedly one of the buzziest films of the summer season. It’s got stellar reviews, a cool underdog vibe after becoming a huge blockbuster in South Korea, and stars Captain America himself. So, how is it that two weeks after it finally hit U.S. theaters in limited release, audiences can already rent the film on VOD? Ten years ago this might have signaled a failure, but today, it’s just part of RADiUS-TWC’s distribution plan. And based on this weekend’s numbers and the fact that the pic skyrocketed to the No. 1 spot on iTunes and many other digital platforms less than a day after launching, it seems to be working.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP