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Tag: Brad Pitt (41-50 of 83)

The state of the modern movie star: 2012 and beyond

Writers have been documenting the incredible shrinking movie star for decades. Google “the last movie star,” and not only will you find serious musings about George Clooney, Will Smith, and Tom Cruise, but thoughtful ones about Elizabeth Taylor. Hyperbole about imminent extinction aside, movie stars have shrunk as the films have grown bigger and louder. Just look at the box-office results from last year. Thirteen of the top 15 films were sequels, franchise starters, or animated films that don’t always require or even want stars. So far this year, The Hunger Games has proven once again that you don’t need a huge international star like Smith, Cruise, or Brad Pitt to mint box-office millions, and The Avengers cruised past a billion dollars with stars predominantly of Marvel’s own creation. Meanwhile, Johnny Depp, one of the other famous faces currently chiseled in Hollywood’s hypothetical Mt. Rushmore, learned that makeup, eccentricity, and Tim Burton do not always connect, as Dark Shadows opened poorly and is limping home. It all begs the question: Are movie stars still essential? And as the current class of elite stars inches towards 50, who is poised to save the planet and catch the bad guy while kissing the girl? READ FULL STORY

Cannes: Brad Pitt is menacingly good in the scuzzy, snazzy underworld movie 'Killing Them Softly'

I wasn’t nearly as wild as a lot of critics about The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford — I thought it was too long, too arty and slow, too in love with its moods and images. Yet it was clear that the director, the New Zealand-born Australian Andrew Dominik, was very gifted. Whenever Brad Pitt appeared as Jesse James, the screen vibrated with menace, even though Pitt seemed to be doing almost nothing. As good as he had been before (in, say, Fight Club), I thought that the Jesse James performance was the place where Pitt took the full leap to who he is today — a top-of-his-game Hollywood actor who infuses star aura with complexity. In Killing Them Softly, Dominik’s first feature since The Assassination of Jesse James, Pitt once again plays a quietly powerful sociopath, and once again the screen vibrates. The thing about Pitt’s charismatic badasses — and this is what a lot of haters still miss about him as an actor — is that although they radiate a certain brawny physical fearlessness, they draw their strength from Pitt’s intelligence, his quicksilver-cool line readings and aura of awareness. READ FULL STORY

Cannes 2012 preview: Brad Pitt, Nicole Kidman, and Kristen Stewart bring Hollywood glitz to the French Riviera -- VIDEO

Since its inception in 1947, the Cannes Film Festival has been the ne plus ultra of international cinema, but rarely has the festival featured quite so many American filmmakers and Hollywood movie stars. The 2012 Cannes festival gets underway on Wednesday with the opening film, Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom, and over the course of the subsequent 11 days, the festival will premiere films starring (deep breath) Brad Pitt, Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon, Kristen Stewart, Zac Efron, Shia LaBeouf, Robert Pattinson, Kirsten Dunst, Tom Hardy, Amy Adams, Viggo Mortensen, and Matthew McConaughey (in two movies!), with filmmakers like Anderson, Lee Daniels, and John Hillcoat screening their films in competition for the first time. Meanwhile, DreamWorks Animation’s Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted and the HBO TV movie Hemingway & Gellhorn are both premiering out of competition.

EW’s Owen Gleiberman will be detailing all his thoughts on the great and not so great at Cannes, but here’s a quick primer on what’s likely to light up the famed Croisette, in chronological order of their big premieres inside the cavernous Grand Théâtre Lumière.  READ FULL STORY

Cannes Festival announces 2012 line-up

Cannes announced its complete line-up for the 2012 festival. As previously reported, Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom will open the festival, which runs from May 16-27. Other films in contention for the prestigious Palme d’Or include David Cronenberg’s ultra-violent Cosmopolis, Brad Pitt’s upcoming Killing Them Softly, Lee Daniels’ Precious follow-up The Paperboy, John Hillcoat’s Lawless, Eva Mendes starrer Holy Motors, and films from Abbas Kiarostami, Ken Loach, Michael Haneke, Alain Resnais, and Walter Salles.

Highlights beyond the Palme d’Or race include Sundance favorite Beasts of the Southern Wild, Ken Burns doc The Central Park Five, Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted, Clive Owen and Nicole Kidman starrer Hemingway & Gellhorn, and films from Bernardo Bertolucci and Dario Argento. Claude Miller’s non-competing Thérèse Desqueyroux will close the ceremonies. Click through for the full list. READ FULL STORY

Jonah Hill, James Franco to star in drama 'True Story'

Jonah Hill and James Franco will star in the movie adaptation of Michael Finkel’s memoir, True Story, Deadline reports. Hill will play Finkel, a New York Times Magazine writer who was fired in 2002 for fabricating parts of a story right as an Oregon man named Christian Longo (Franco), who was wanted for killing his family, was captured in Mexico — where, oddly enough, he’d assumed Finkel’s identity. Longo would only give his story to the real Finkel, who visited, phoned, and wrote Longo to learn the truth about the fugitive’s family. The movie will be produced by Hill’s Moneyball costar Brad Pitt’s production company, Plan B.

Read more:
A Deep Dive into ‘Moneyball’
Jonah Hill to host ‘Saturday Night Live’

Owen Gleiberman and Lisa Schwarzbaum: Is the Academy using the Oscars to promote its own credibility? -- VIDEO

Hollywood’s biggest night is only two days away — do you have your special Academy Awards sweats picked out yet?

Get a head start on your Oscar weekend debates with Movie Talk with Owen and Lisa — in which EW critics Owen Gleiberman and Lisa Schwarzbaum lament how the Oscars aren’t channeling the public anymore and name their picks for who should win Lead Actor and Lead Actress. Spoiler: It’s not “this French guy no one has ever heard of”! READ FULL STORY

Brad Pitt talks collaborating with 'The Help' director Tate Taylor

It was back in August when news broke that The Help director Tate Taylor was circling an adaptation of the 2002 novel Peace Like a River, about an 11-year-old asthmatic boy who goes on a cross-country search with his sister and father for his older brother who has been charged with murder, to be produced by Brad Pitt’s Plan B. But Pitt’s been waiting longer than that to bring the story to the screen. Peace Like a River was the second project Pitt bought when he started Plan B in 2002. “The first one was The Departed. The second one was this one, and it’s just taken awhile for it to gestate and find the right guy to tell it,” Pitt told us at the Producers Guild Awards on Saturday.

Any chance will be seeing Pitt take the director’s chair anytime soon? “Hell no. Not interested. Not my thing,” he said.

Read more:
Producers Guild Awards red carpet: Angelina Jolie, Jessica Chastain go black to basics — PHOTOS
‘The Artist,’ ‘Tintin’ win Producers Guild Awards

Owen's awards-movie scorecard: Who said all this stuff gets to be decided before the movies even come out?

A few weeks ago, the holiday movie season — or, at least, the conventional wisdom on it — went a little nutty. The media decreed the following things: that Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, with a $39.6 million opening weekend gross, was a disappointment; that Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked, with a $23 million opening-weekend gross, was also a disappointment; and that The Descendants (closing in on $30 million) was underperforming. These weren’t opinions — they were incontrovertible movie-industry facts, delivered with the requisite tut-tutting of sky-is-falling doom. As for the awards season, that had all been sorted out, thank you, even though most of the relevant films had barely even begun to be seen by audiences. The Artist, mopping up critics’ awards, had Harvey Weinstein behind it, going into full-court-press Oscar mode, so of course it was foregone that that was going to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Best Actor looked like a runoff between George Clooney and The Artist‘s Jean Dujardin. And The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo? Sorry, not even in the running. Not an “awards film.” (Too violent! Too pulpy!) READ FULL STORY

'Melancholia,' Brad Pitt, Kirsten Dunst win National Society of Film Critics awards

Lars von Trier’s Melancholia took home its first major U.S. awards yesterday when the National Society of Film Critics voted it the Best Picture of the Year, and star Kirsten Dunst as Best Actress. Brad Pitt won Best Actor for both Moneyball and The Tree of Life; Albert Brooks won Best Supporting Actor for Drive; and Jessica Chastain won Best Supporting Actor for The Tree of Life, Take Shelter, and The Help.

Unlike most other year-end awards, the National Society of Film Critics — which is comprised of 58 film critics from across the country (including EW’s Owen Gleiberman and Lisa Schwarzbaum) — also releases the first-and-second runners-up to each of its awards, along with the vote totals in its weighted ballot system. You can check out the full list of winners and runners-up below:  READ FULL STORY

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