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Tag: Christopher Nolan (31-40 of 68)

Gary Oldman talks 'Dark Knight Rises' ending, and Tom Hardy spills on Bane inspiration

At the star-studded premiere of Dark Knight Rises last night (check out a compilation of live-stream footage here) the stars were ready to talk about the final film in Christopher Nolan’s epic trilogy — but they were tight-lipped as far as plot specifics. (No big details are given away, but for those that want to remain totally spoiler free, here is your SPOILER ALERT!)

Gary Oldman, who plays police commissioner Gordon in the films, told EW when asked about the ending, “It packs an emotional punch, this one,” Oldman said. “And it’s got hope. [Dark Knight wasn’t so hopeful.] But we still had another one to make. [This one] has got a nice, uplifting theme to it.”

Christian Bale agreed with Oldman’s assessment of the tone. He told EW, “There’s a lot of complexities to it.” But as to whether or not Dark Knight Rises would feel different from Dark Knight, Bale didn’t want to distinguish. “I kind of feel like [the trilogy] is one movie anyway,” he said. READ FULL STORY

'The Dark Knight Rises' movie premiere: Watch the live stream replay here!

The Dark Knight Rises may appear to be in part a parable about the dangers of conspicuous displays of excessive wealth, but in the case of the world premiere of the conclusion to Christopher Nolan’s record-breaking Batman saga, a little glitz and glamour seem perfectly called for.

Check out the live stream from the red-carpet event in New York City below to see stars Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, Tom Hardy, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Michael Caine, Gary Oldman, Morgan Freeman, and Marion Cotillard alongside Nolan, fellow writers Jonathan Nolan and David S. Goyer, and fellow producers Emma Thomas and Charles Roven. The festivities start at 6 p.m. ET / 3 p.m. PT. READ FULL STORY

'Dark Knight Rises' new IMAX poster

With just a little over a week until the July 20th release of Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight Rises, fan excitement for the epic conclusion is gearing up.

For the lucky few that already have tickets to a midnight IMAX screening, even more great news: IMAX announced yesterday that ticketholders attending 12:01 a.m. screenings of The Dark Knight Rises on July 20 will receive an exclusive print featuring the movie’s villain, Bane (Tom Hardy). For those that don’t yet have midnight tickets, good luck.

The black-and-white image premiered on Fandango Tuesday.

Read more:
You can now stream the ‘Dark Knight Rises’ soundtrack online
‘The Dark Knight Rises’: Christopher Nolan cements his place in Hollywood at hand and footprint ceremony 
Five things we learned from ‘The Dark Knight Rises’ production notes

Christopher Nolan says no to 'Justice League' film

Now that Christopher Nolan is done with his epic Batman trilogy, the filmmaker has quashed speculation that he might be involved in a Justice League movie featuring the Dark Knight.

Writer-director Nolan said his take on Batman wraps up with The Dark Knight Rises, his third and final film centered on the DC Comics superhero. In an interview over the weekend to promote the finale, Nolan said he has no Justice League plans.

“No, none at all,” Nolan said. “We’re finished with all we’re doing with Batman. This is the end of our take on this character.”

Fans have conjectured that Nolan might return to Batman by producing a big-screen take on Justice League, DC Comics’ Avengers-style ensemble whose key superheroes include the Dark Knight, Superman, Wonder Woman and Green Lantern.

READ FULL STORY

'The Dark Knight Rises': Christopher Nolan cements his place in Hollywood at hand and footprint ceremony

Christopher Nolan will leave big shoes to fill when it comes to future silver screen interpretations of the Batman story, but for now he’s letting his shoes leave their mark – in Hollywood’s most famous cement courtyard, that is. The Dark Knight Rises director was honored during a hand and footprint ceremony at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles today.

Nolan joins 261 other Hollywood luminaries – including Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Julie Andrews and Steven Spielberg – immortalized in the Forecourt to the Stars since 1927.

“This is all a bit surreal for me,” Nolan told the crowd, which included his family, cast members of The Dark Knight Rises, frequent collaborators Wally Pfister and Hans Zimmer, and an assemblage of eager Batman fans. The director – who is also behind such mind-benders as Inception, Memento and The Prestige – then recalled his first visit to Grauman’s at the age of 16. READ FULL STORY

'Dark Knight Rises' TV spot: Catwoman to the rescue

Anne Hathaway’s Catwoman gets an extra-special showcase in the latest TV advertisement for The Dark Knight Rises, Christopher Nolan’s upcoming movie about steroidal anarchists with breathing masks or whatever. “You don’t stand a chance against these guys,” says Anne-Cat. “With your help, I might,” says Bale-Bat. Watch the trailer: READ FULL STORY

'The Dark Knight Rises' trailer: A bleak vision of Batman's future

In four days, by all reports audiences will be streaming in droves to see The Avengers, a big, rousing, brightly-colored superhero movie filled with aliens, Norse gods, and giant green rage monsters. Before that movie begins, however, they’ll see the trailer for a very different kind of superhero movie, The Dark Knight Rises. That trailer was just released on the web, the culmination of a viral marketing campaign that began this morning. The preview paints a bleak, almost nihilistic picture of what awaits audiences on July 20 — check out the trailer below, and then let’s talk about our first impressions:  READ FULL STORY

CinemaCon 2012: 'The Dark Knight Rises' wages class warfare in new footage

The Dark Knight Rises is looking less like a superhero movie and more like a film about civil war or a populist revolution.

Take a look at the people who help you through your day — the store clerk, the hotel bellman, the waiter. Then imagine the working class rising up to attack the people they serve. That’s what the villain Bane appears to be orchestrating in new footage from The Dark Knight Rises, which screened Tuesday at the theater-owner convention CinemaCon.

“What defines cinema and gets people out of the home to watch it, is spectacle,” filmmaker Christopher Nolan said. “What we wanted to do with this story was finish it in the biggest way possible.”

Read a description of the footage after the jump. READ FULL STORY

'The Dark Knight Rises' star Tom Hardy talks about playing Bane and inventing the villain's controversial voice: 'It's a risk.'

When Christopher Nolan asked Tom Hardy to play the villain in his third and final Batman movie, The Dark Knight Rises, due July 20, the director doted on one job requirement in particular: the budding star would have to wear a mask that looked like a leathery baboon mouth with metal casings for fangs – a sort of steampunk respirator as fashioned by Francis Bacon. “I think he worried it would be something I might not consider because wearing a mask might damage my career or something. He thought I’d be worried that the audience couldn’t see my beautiful face,” says Hardy, who also worked for Nolan in the filmmaker’s 2010 Oscar-nominated smash Inception. “Like I care. It’s Chris Nolan! I would wear a paper bag over my head for that man.”

To play Bane, a willfully evil and possibly unstoppable force of mind and might, the British actor wanted to develop a distinctive voice, one that evoked (albeit elliptically) the comic book character’s erudition and ethnic heritage (Bane hails from a fictional Caribbean country). Hardy sought a sound befitting a man steeped in malevolence and old soul wisdom and who could trace his roots to ancient Latin culture. “There were two doors we could walk through,” says Hardy. “We could play a very straightforward villain or we could go through this very quirky door, which is totally justified by the text but may seem very, very stupid.” Not surprisingly, Hardy decided to go for the second option. “It’s a risk, because we could be laughed at—or it could be very fresh and exciting,” he says. While some found his dialogue incomprehensible in the IMAX-exclusive sneak peek attached to Mission: Impossible—Ghost Protocol last December, the actor asks for patience. “The audience mustn’t be too concerned about the mumbly voice,” says Hardy. “As the film progresses, I think you’ll be able to tune to its setting.”

Bane’s motivation as a villain remains one of Rises’ best-kept secrets—although the trailers suggest his master plan requires the razing of Gotham and the death of Bruce Wayne. Does Bane represent a specific political or philosophical complaint? The answer is… maybe. “I think the politics of the film are going to be hotly debated one way or another, as they were in the last film,” says Nolan. Listening to Hardy compare Bane to the scarred, clown-faced villain who terrorized Gotham City in The Dark Knight, you almost get the feeling of a revolutionary usurper with tremendous resources. “The Joker didn’t care—he just wanted to see the world burn, and he was a master of chaos and destruction, unscrupulous and crazy. Bane is not that guy,” says Hardy. “There is a very meticulous and calculated way about Bane. There is a huge orchestration of organization to his ambition. He is also a physical threat to Batman. There is nothing vague about Bane. No jokes. He’s a very clean, clear villain.”

For more about The Dark Knight Rises, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, which features our annual Summer Movie Preview. Get the scoop on all of the season’s most anticipated films, including The Avengers, The Amazing Spider-Man, Prometheus, Men In Black 3, Snow White and The Huntsman, and more.

Entertainment Weekly is now available on most tablets, including the iPad, Nook Color, Kindle Fire, and Samsung Galaxy. Think of it like the EW you already love, but on steroids: With our digital magazine, you can buy the recommended movies, albums, books, and DVDs while you’re reading about them. Plus, you can watch music videos and film trailers, and find movie showtimes in your neighborhood. Current subscribers can access the digital version of EW for free by downloading the EW app (also free) and logging in using your name and address or the information on your subscription label. Single copies of the magazine are also for sale through the app if you prefer to read EW that way. If you’re not a subscriber, but would like to become one, you can do so by going to ew.com/allaccess.

'The Dark Knight Rises' earns PG-13 rating for violence and...sensuality?

The MPAA has come under some flack of late for its one-size-fits-all rating system and vague-at-best explanations for those ratings. But there’s a fun flip-side to the murkiness: Speculating on what those ratings and their explanations might infer about the movie in question — in this case, The Dark Knight Rises.

The MPAA handed a PG-13 rating today to The Dark Knight Rises, for “intense sequences of violence and action, some sensuality and language.” The rating itself does not mean the movie is totally done — films often screen well before the director is finished with technical elements like visual effects, sound design, and color timing. But it does provide us with a tantalizing indication for what may be in store with a wildly anticipated film that has otherwise put a high premium on plot details. Namely: Language? Sensuality? Intriguing!  READ FULL STORY

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