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Tag: Documentary (1-10 of 174)

Batkid documentary crowdsourcing funds on Indiegogo

The origin story of Batman can be found in comic books and on screens both big and small. But the same can’t be said for that of Batkid, a.k.a. 5-year-old Miles Scott, a.k.a. the leukemia survivor whose instantly viral Make-a-Wish request was to be Batman for a day. Back in November, the city of San Francisco made Miles’ wish come true when 25,000 people lined the streets to cheer him through his journey to save Gotham.

Batkid’s adventure quickly made the rounds on social media, even reaching President Obama, who recorded a message for Miles. And now, filmmaker Dana Nachman wants to bring Batkid’s story to the big screen in a documentary titled Batkid Begins.

After talking to everyone from Miles’ parents to the participants in Batkid’s big day, Nachman is taking her film to Indiegogo to try to raise $100,000 to finish post-production. Specifically, the money will be used for aerial shots, soundtrack, special effects, and more.

According to the film’s Indiegogo page, “Batkid Begins follows the events leading up to the day Batkid saved San Francisco and what happens when an event goes unintentionally viral.” Contributors will receive a variety of rewards, from a Batkid cape to an associate producer credit. The Indiegogo campaign will last for 36 days.

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Meet the world's manliest Brony

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Dusty Rhoades is a man. A man who eats red meat and builds motorcycles from scratch. A man who once worked as a “bodyguard/ranch hand” and maintains a very impressive, very geometric mustache. A man who discovered the wheel and built the Eiffel Tower out of metal and brawn.

Take a closer look at him, though, and you might notice something just a little bit… off. Nope, you’re not seeing things: Rhoades is, in fact, wearing a “My Little Pony” shirt. And those blurry, colorful objects on the bookshelf behind him? Yeah: They’re pretty ponies with big, sparkling cartoon eyes and long, flowing manes.

See, Dusty isn’t just a man’s man—he’s also the dude known far and wide (among My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fans, anyway) as Dustykatt, a.k.a. The Manliest Brony in the World. And he’s got a message for all the nay neighsayers out there: “If this guy can like a girl’s show for what it is, you can, too.” READ FULL STORY

Video: Documentary 'Skanks' tells the story of a drag musical in an unlikely place

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Warning: Skanks is not your average behind the scenes film.

The one-of-a-kind documentary from director David McMahon follows a small community theater in Birmingham, Alabama rehearsing their new musical, the drag spectacular entitled Skanks in a One Horse Town. The film premieres this Saturday night as part of Rooftop Films 2014 Summer Series, and EW has a clip chronicling the drama of opening night:
















The premiere event, beginning at 8 p.m., will include a live performance by Maddelynn Hatter and Pusse Couture, a Q&A with McMahon, and a performance by cast members of Skanks in a One Horse Town. Watch the trailer for the film below, and visit the Rooftop website for more information.
















Quidditch documentary 'Mudbloods' coming in the fall

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From the mind of J.K. Rowling to the sporting fields of America, quidditch has become an international sensation, and a new documentary will explore the real-life competition.

Mudbloods documents the Fifth Annual Qudditch World Cup in New York City and specifically the fight the underdog team from UCLA makes to claim the ultimate golden snitch. The film was directed by former UCLA film student Farzad Sangari and will be distributed by BOND/360 on demand and special theatrical engagements in October. READ FULL STORY

Docurama wants to be your home for free, on-demand documentaries -- EXCLUSIVE

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Documentaries serve a crucial role in our culture — not only because they can challenge the way we look at the world, but also because, occasionally, they might actually prod us off our collective asses to do something. An Inconvenient Truth, Bowling for Columbine, Paradise Lost: these films motivated some moviegoers to get involved in important issues in ways they never thought they would. Other documentaries aren’t trying to change the world necessarily, but  still discover and dissect fascinating people and events in ways that fiction can’t or won’t. Offer me Michael Mann’s Ali and Leon Gast’s When We Were Kings, for example, and I’ll choose the real Ali every time. Ali, boom bye yae!

Docurama, a free on-demand streaming channel, debuts today, and it’s hoping to eventually become the home for serious documentary viewing. At launch, the site already features movies from award-winning filmmakers such as Alex Gibney, Fred Wiseman, and Joe Berlinger, and the service is promising to have more than 1,000 titles available by mid-summer. READ FULL STORY

'Blazing Saddles,' 40 years later: A conversation with Mel Brooks -- EXCLUSIVE

When Mel Brooks demands a harumph, you give Mel Brooks a harumph.

Harumph, harumph, harumph!

After all, he’s carving time out of his day to speak about Blazing Saddles, the delirious western that is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a special edition Blu-ray, out May 6. Time is of the essence: “I have people coming in to give me awards,” Brooks jokes. “Every 45 minutes, roughly, someone will knock on my door and give me the United Jewish something or other. I always get an award every day, some kind of award.”

Well, it’s good to be the king. And Mel Brooks has worn the crown well since Blazing Saddles, since The Producers, since Get Smart, since writing for Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows. But Blazing Saddles might be his zaniest movie ever, which is saying something. In 1874, a mustache-twirling villain (Harvey Korman) wants the valuable land that belongs to the white residents of Rock Ridge, so he names a black railroad worker who’s scheduled to be hanged (Cleavon Little) as their new sheriff. His plan backfires when the charming sheriff pairs up with a pickled old gunfighter (Gene Wilder), winning over the hearts, minds, and loins of the simple folk. READ FULL STORY

Tribeca Film Festival: Nas music documentary 'Time is Illmatic' premieres opening night

The 13th Tribeca Film Festival kicked off Wednesday with Nas documentary Time is Illmatic, directed by multimedia artist and first-time director One9.

The film — which premiered at New York’s Beacon Theater — chronicles the rapper’s journey from the Queens projects to the debut of his 1994 record Illmatic, widely considered one of the best rap albums of all time.

“The nature of the subject is about surviving and thriving,” said Tribeca Film Festival co-founder Jane Rosenthal. “That’s what New York did post-9/11,” when Rosenthal, Robert De Niro and Craig Hatkoff held the first Tribeca fest. “And that’s what Nas has done in his career. It’s about bridging cultures and bridging communities — that’s what his work is about.”

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Jane Goodall Q&A: Scientist talks Disneynature Ambassador role, future birthday plans

Dr. Jane Goodall is known the world over as a chimps expert. but over the course of many decades, the British scientist’s extensive research has made her a prominent environmentalist and humanitarian as well. Among her many distinctions and titles is being named the first-ever ambassador for Disneynature, the Walt Disney Label behind the upcoming nature documentary Bears.

“The Disneynature team is honored to have Dr. Jane Goodall as our official ambassador, inspiring others to take part in the world of Bears – which is our shared world – and to make a difference,” Alan Bergman, President, The Walt Disney Studios, said. “Jane has had an impact on countless lives—human and animals alike.  She speaks from her heart for all living things, championing the next generation’s pursuit in protecting our planet.”

Between promoting her Roots & Shoots environmental outreach program, traveling, fundraising, and celebrating her 80th birthday on April 3, Goodall spoke to EW about her secret to aging gracefully, her experience traveling to Alaska for the filming of Bears, and details for next year’s birthday plans. READ FULL STORY

'Teenage' executive producer Jason Schwartzman on zoot suits and youth culture's pre-history

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Today’s teenagers may be their own industry, but the idea that there’s a distinctive time between childhood and adulthood is still relatively new.

Filmmaker Matt Wolf explores this concept, and the genesis of western youth culture, in Teenage, an intoxicating, genre-bending portrait of teenage life inspired by Jon Savage’s eponymous book. With never-before-seen archival footage, recreations, an original score from Deerhunter’s Bradford Cox, and voiceovers from the likes of Ben Whishaw and Jena Malone, Wolf creates an experimental, creative non-fiction collage that covers the turn of the century through 1945.

In retelling the stories of boxcar children, victory girls, Bright Young Things, zoot suits, and other youth movements of the past century, Teenage finds a universal story of discontent, alienation, feverish energy, and rebellion.

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Knicks hoops documentary headlines Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival

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The New York Knicks are one of basketball’s most storied franchises but they haven’t won an NBA title since 1973. Celebrity fans like Spike Lee, Woody Allen, and screenwriter William Goldman worshipped the star-studded — but team-first — Knicks teams of that championship era, and a generation of aging sportswriters refuse to let those hardwood legends die. Actor Michael Rapaport was only three years old when the Knicks won their last title, but he’s turned his yearning for those glory years into a documentary, When the Garden was Eden.

Rapaport’s movie, which is also part of ESPN’s “30 for 30″ series, headlines this year’s Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, and will be the program’s gala premiere on April 17. “As a native New Yorker and lifelong Knicks fan, it was an honor to explore the championship New York Knick teams,” Rapaport said in a statement. “Those players have been a part of my vocabulary since I was a child…Walt Frazier, Earl Monroe and Willis Reed are icons of New York City and it’s been a privilege to be a part of re-telling the Knicks story.”

Also premiering is Champs, which examines how the brutal sport pulled all-time greats, like Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield, out of a life of crime and poverty.

Click below for the entire Tribeca/ESPN lineup, descriptions courtesy of the festival: READ FULL STORY

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