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Tag: Domhnall Gleeson (1-9 of 9)

Angelina Jolie talks 'Unbroken' and her brilliant new star, Jack O'Connell

All she can see, in every direction, is water. It’s Oct. 16, 2013, the first day of filming on the WWII drama Unbroken, and a barge has taken Angelina Jolie, her crew, and an enormous crane camera onto the open Pacific off the coast of Queensland, Australia. As she stands on the ship, silhouetted by bright blue sky and deep blue sea, actors Jack O’Connell, Domhnall Gleeson, and Finn Wittrock float nearby in a small yellow raft. They are skinny and weak and starving, having subsisted on just 500 calories a day for two months. Suddenly, the wind picks up, stirring salt spray and waves. The crew on the barge begins to slip and fall. Jolie can barely hear O’Connell, her young star, deliver his lines, and for a moment she can’t even see him. As the camera zooms in for a close-up, he bobs helplessly in and out of frame.

“If you saw that first shot and my reaction to it, you’d be absolutely sure that this was going to be one of the great disasters of filmmaking history,” Jolie says today with a smile, sitting on a sofa at Milk Studios in Los Angeles. “The only thing you could do was laugh at how insane this was all going to be. And then you just had to take a deep breath and figure out what to do next.”

Ah, the eternal unanswerable question: What will Angelina Jolie do next? In a life that has spanned her transformation from Gia Carangi to Evelyn Salt, from femme fatale to media-sainted ambassador, from wild child to mother of six, she has been everything except one thing: predictable. Now, on the heels of the highest-grossing film of her career, Maleficent, Jolie, 39, is shifting her focus from movie star to director. Unbroken, her $65 million period epic, is her most ambitious undertaking yet.

The film (in theaters Dec. 25) tells the true story of Louie Zamperini (O’Connell), the son of Italian immigrants who competed in the 1936 Berlin Olympics and fought in the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II, when his plane went down over the Pacific. He survived the crash and spent 47 days adrift on a raft before Japanese troops took him to a POW camp. There he endured more than two years of near-relentless brutality, most of it at the hands of a sadistic guard known as the Bird.

This is Jolie’s second film as director, and while her first, 2011’s Bosnian war drama In the Land of Blood and Honey, was hardly a tidy chamber piece, the scale of Unbroken is  massive, unfolding over multiple decades on three different continents—and on lots and lots of water. Even filmmakers as seasoned as Joel and Ethan Coen, who helped adapt the script from Laura Hillenbrand’s 2010 best-seller, have described the project as “a motherf- - -er” to make. “I didn’t know what I was up against when I was first getting into it,” Jolie says. “I had never done anything like it. I was up for the challenge, but I had so much to learn.”

Only four women in history have been nominated for Best Director Oscars, and while a fusillade of male actors have transitioned behind the camera to Academy acclaim—Robert Redford, Mel Gibson, Kevin Costner, et al.—Jolie joins a ridiculously small group of A-list actresses who have built significant careers as directors: Ida Lupino, Penny Marshall, Barbra Streisand, and Jodie Foster are pretty much it. None have been nominated for directing. Whether Unbroken will shatter that glass ceiling remains to be seen. Regardless, Jolie has found her calling. “I’m very happy as a director,” she says. “I may be stressed, but I’m loving every difficult challenge. I love seeing a story through from beginning to end. I like the nurturing aspect of it—building the family of crew and supporting everyone.” She grins. “I’m much happier not being that person out in the front.”

'Ex Machina' trailer takes 'Her' to the next frightening level

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Alex Garland, the author of The Beach and screenwriter of 28 Days Later and Dredd, makes his directorial debut with Ex Machina, which features two next-generation Star Wars actors in a thriller about an artificial-intelligence experiment. Domhnall Gleeson plays a low-level programmer who’s selected by his internet company’s reclusive CEO (Oscar Isaac) to take part in a unique Turing Test with Ava (Alicia Vikander), an alluring and sophisticated creature who might be more advanced than both men can fathom. “One day, the AIs are going to look back on us the same way we look at fossils,” says Isaac’s genius. READ FULL STORY

'Frank' trailer: Michael Fassbender gets eccentric in papier-mache head -- VIDEO

Actors love the challenge of a disguise–whether it’s a weight gain or loss, a prosthetic nose, a wig, or full-on CGI transformation, it signifies commitment with a capital “c” to the casual onlooker. In Lenny Abrahamson’s Frank, handsome Michael Fassbender takes the idea of a disguise one step further to play the idiosyncratic lead singer of an already peculiar fringe pop group: He wears a papier-mache head for the entirety of the film.

The oddball comedy, which premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, introduces viewers to this band of misfits through Domhnall Gleeson’s wide-eyed, blogging Jon, a wannabe who joins the band–which includes Maggie Gyllenhaal’s Clara, a deadpan, tell-it-like-it-is theremin player–as they grasp for authenticity and artistic inspiration, while also trying to tolerate Frank’s whimsical mode of living.

Check out the first U.S. trailer after the jump. READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Kevin Hart and Jamie Foxx in talks for 'Black Phantom'; Plus, Jason Sudeikis, Dr. Doom rumors

• Kevin Hart and Jamie Foxx are in talks to star in Black Phantom, a Screen Gems hitman pic. Ride Along‘s Tim Story is in talks to direct the film about a hitman reeling from a recent betrayal who hires the guy who was hired to kill him for help. Foxx can be seen next in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (out May 2). Hart’s Think Like a Man Too (also directed by Story) is out June 20. [Variety] READ FULL STORY

'Frank' trailer: Michael Fassbender covers up with giant, fake head -- VIDEO

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Michael Fassbender plays a musical genius who can’t seem to face life “face on” in the film Frank.

The offbeat comedy directed by Lenny Abrahamson premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and tells the story of the avant-garde pop band led by the mysterious and enigmatic Frank (Fassbender) as they travel to perform at the South by Southwest Festival in Texas. Domhnall Gleeson and Maggie Gyllenhaal star as Frank’s bandmates. The story, written by Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare At Goats) and Peter Straughan (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), is loosely inspired by Frank Sidebottom, the persona of cult musician and comedy legend Chris Sievey, as well as other outsider musicians like Daniel Johnston and Captain Beefheart.

The film will be released in the U.K. May 9, with a domestic release planned for later this year. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Elizabeth Olsen for 'Avengers: Age of Ultron'?; Plus, Bradley Cooper in talks to voice Rocket Raccoon, more

• Elizabeth Olsen is reportedly in talks to play Wanda Maximoff (also known as the Scarlet Witch) in Joss Whedon’s The Avengers: Age of Ultron. The Marvel character is the offspring of Magneto (an X-Men character and Fox property) and boasts the ability to reshape reality and alter probabilities. Olsen broke out in the independent world with her role in Martha Marcy May Marlene, but it seems like she has broader, more mainstream plans — she recently wrapped Godzilla and will be appearing in Spike Lee’s Oldboy remake. [Bleeding Cool]
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Richard Curtis on 'About Time' being his last film: 'I decided I should take my own advice'

Richard Curtis’ new film About Time — out Nov. 8 — stars Domhnall Gleeson as a young Englishman who discovers that he can travel through time, just like his dad (Bill Nighy). But the director, who has written such rom-com classics as Four Weddings and a Funeral and Notting Hill, as well as directing Love Actually (the cinematic equivalent to a supergroup), insists that he hasn’t switched genres completely.

“It’s actually an anti-time-travel time-travel movie,” he says with a laugh. But how could this be? “You’ll understand once you see it,” he promises. “It’s really a philosophical movie — what if you had one day to live? You wouldn’t want to try to win an Oscar or get an Olympic gold medal. You’d live a normal day: You’d have breakfast with your kids and lunch with your friends and dinner with someone you love. This film is about what matters in time. And it turns out, in my opinion, to be the most ordinary of things.”

It was this thinking that helped Curtis come to the realization that About Time will more than likely be the last film he directs.
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Rachel McAdams' 'About Time' trailer: 'Have we had this conversation before?' -- VIDEO

From Richard Curtis, the writer of Notting Hill and Love Actually, comes another story about love in a complicated world. But this time around, the complication involves a bit of time travel.

In About Time, Domhnall Gleeson (Harry Potter‘s Bill Weasley) stars as Tim, a young man whose father (played by Bill Nighy) informs him that the men in their family have a very special talent. Give these guys a dark space and let them really concentrate, and they can travel through time. The trick is how much and for what they use their gift. And after Tim falls in love with Mary (Rachel McAdams) and starts to use time travel to re-do things — like the first time they met or the first time they slept together, things start to go a little haywire.

Watch the slightly different domestic and international trailers for About Time below: READ FULL STORY

Rachel McAdams rom-com 'About Time' gets new release date

Rachel McAdams’ upcoming time travel romantic comedy, About Time, is doing some of its own leaping across the calendar. Universal announced on Thursday that the film, originally slated for a May 10, 2013 opening date, will now launch in limited release on Nov. 1, 2013 opening nationwide on Nov. 8, 2013.

In About Time, Mary (McAdams) falls in love with Tim Lake (Harry Potter actor Domhnall Gleeson), a man who learns that he, like his father (Bill Nighy), has the ability to travel through time. When an unfortunate time travel incident re-writes history to erase Mary and Tim ever meeting, he has to win her heart all over again. READ FULL STORY

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