Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: James Gray (1-3 of 3)

Jeremy Renner is a master of illusion in 'The Immigrant' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Immigrant.jpg

In The Immigrant, Marion Cotillard plays Ewa, a Polish woman whose American Dream is hijacked almost as soon as she lands on Ellis Island in 1921. All alone, she’s threatened with deportation until she’s rescued by Bruno (Joaquin Phoenix) — a schemer as dastardly as Pinocchio‘s Stromboli, who forces her into a hard life of servitude and prostitution.

Bruno’s cousin, a magician named Orlando (Jeremy Renner), offers Ewa a ray of hope. And in this exclusive clip from the film, Orlando demonstrates a feat as wondrous as the American Dream itself — as long as you’re willing to ignore the tricks that make the illusion possible.

Director James Gray (We Own the Night) based the film in part on the hard-luck immigrant tales his grandparents told him when he was a child. “One of the funnier things I read in the research I was doing was, an immigrant was asked, ‘How do you feel about America?’ He said, ‘Well, they told me the streets were paved with gold. But I didn’t realize that the streets wouldn’t be paved at all, and I would be the one who needed to do the paving,’” says Gray.

Click below for the clip from the film, which opens May 16, and an extensive Q&A with Gray. READ FULL STORY

'The Immigrant': Marion Cotillard finds hardship in America -- VIDEO

Marion Cotillard plays a Polish immigrant who comes to America full of hope — and stays as a prostitute — in The Immigrant. 1920s America: what a time!

The film, directed by James Gray, was met with glowing reviews at the 2013 Cannes festival. It follows the story of Cotillard’s Ewa, who struggles to find the American dream while working for a pimp (Joaquin Phoenix) as a magician (Jeremy Renner) tries to help set her free.

The Immigrant comes out May 16. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

Cannes 2013: 'Blue Is the Warmest Color' is a seriously sexy French lesbian love story

There’s a first time for everything. At a Cannes showing of Blue Is the Warmest Color, a three-hour French drama about a young woman who falls into a romance that digs its hooks in and won’t let go of her, the audience sat raptly as Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos), a quietly precocious 17-year-old Paris high school girl, goes to bed with Emma (Léa Seydoux), the painter and Fine Arts graduate student she met at a lesbian bar. It’s Adèle’s first experience with another woman — but ever since the late ’70s, there have been plenty of lesbian-awakening dramas, most of them on the soft and dewy side. In this case, when the sex scene was over, after what felt like it must have been 15 minutes of writhing, moaning erotic hunger, people in the audience burst into whoops of approval and applause — something I have never in my life seen happen after a sex scene. It’s not so much that the audience was being cute, attempting to acknowledge that the scene was “hot” (although yes, it seriously was). What they were applauding was the authenticity: the fact that the heat was real, and thus the heat had become the drama. Very Last Tango, except minus the perversity. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP