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Tag: Leonardo DiCaprio (51-60 of 97)

International trailer for 'Django Unchained' reveals Samuel L. Jackson's slave character

Last week, we got a heaping helping of the bad ‘ol days with the first trailer for Quentin Tarantino’s slavery-era western Django Unchained, and now a new international trailer is giving us a look at new footage from the vengeance saga, which opens this Christmas.

We only get a glimpse, but it’s the first time we see the house slave played by Samuel L. Jackson — a Tarantino mainstay — who might be unrecognizable if not for the title credit.

Jackson always creates a unique look for his Tarantino characters, and this time around he is downright Uncle Ben-esque. (And we don’t mean the with-great-power-comes-great-responsibility one from Spider-Man.)

Maybe it’s coincidence, but I wouldn’t put it past the actor or the director’s mordant senses of humor to take a shot at at the longtime politically incorrect logo, especially for this character — who has made his share of compromises to survive.

Here are some more observations on the new footage.

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'The Great Gatsby': More new photos from Baz Luhrmann's take on the 1920s classic

More photos from Baz Luhrmann’s 3-D take on The Great Gatsby have hit the Web. The movie’s first trailer, released last month, reassured both Luhrmann fans and F. Scott Fitzgerald devotees that the vision of the two storytellers could be married into one film. Now fans of Lurhmann’s shiny, dazzling style can check out these images to get another look at the director’s interpretation of the high school English class staple, complete with a tuxedo’ed Leonardo diCaprio.

The photos, originally published on WWD.com, feature the cast in various states of merriment. See the more of the new photos (flapper dresses included!) below. READ FULL STORY

The state of the modern movie star: 2012 and beyond

Writers have been documenting the incredible shrinking movie star for decades. Google “the last movie star,” and not only will you find serious musings about George Clooney, Will Smith, and Tom Cruise, but thoughtful ones about Elizabeth Taylor. Hyperbole about imminent extinction aside, movie stars have shrunk as the films have grown bigger and louder. Just look at the box-office results from last year. Thirteen of the top 15 films were sequels, franchise starters, or animated films that don’t always require or even want stars. So far this year, The Hunger Games has proven once again that you don’t need a huge international star like Smith, Cruise, or Brad Pitt to mint box-office millions, and The Avengers cruised past a billion dollars with stars predominantly of Marvel’s own creation. Meanwhile, Johnny Depp, one of the other famous faces currently chiseled in Hollywood’s hypothetical Mt. Rushmore, learned that makeup, eccentricity, and Tim Burton do not always connect, as Dark Shadows opened poorly and is limping home. It all begs the question: Are movie stars still essential? And as the current class of elite stars inches towards 50, who is poised to save the planet and catch the bad guy while kissing the girl? READ FULL STORY

'Django Unchained': 12 strange details from Quentin Tarantino's vengeance Western

Newsflash: Quentin Tarantino is a twisted dude.

That’s why we love the guy, of course. He breathes new life into the genres he touches by infusing them not just with a movie lover’s passion, but with the demented sensibility of someone who’s spent too much time alone in the dark.

When the trailer for Django Unchained debuted yesterday, it did not disappoint, delivering us 2 minutes and 36 seconds of antebellum peculiarity. Here are a few offbeat moments that jumped out.

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'Django Unchained' trailer: Quentin Tarantino's latest turns the time of slavery into one wild Western

Quentin Tarantino is walking a high wire act with Django Unchained, his ’70s-exploitation-style Western about the titular slave (Jamie Foxx) and the bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) who saves his life in exchange for his help hunting three slave-running brothers he’s been contracted to kill. Their bargain: If Django helps Dr. King, Dr. King will help Django find his beloved wife, owned, it turns out, by the swanky plantation proprietor Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). Can Tarantino tackle the troubled, tricky topic of slavery with such a wild and playful tone? Check out the trailer and decide for yourself:  READ FULL STORY

'Titanic' sets course for Blu-ray release

Spurred by the success of the film’s 3-D theatrical re-release, Paramount Home Media Distribution and Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment have announced that Titanic will makes its Blu-ray debut on Sept. 14. The Oscar-sweeping epic will be available as a four-disc Blu-ray/DVD combo pack in both 2-D and 3-D formats, with 2.5 hours of bonus footage including a National Geographic documentary in which director James Cameron explores the wreckage of the actual Titanic. The special features will also be stocked with 30 deleted scenes, more than 60 behind-the-scenes featurettes, three commentary tracks, and 2,000 photos. For the first time, Titanic fans can download the film digitally so they’ll never have to let go of their favorite film.

Read more:
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Book your tickets! ‘Titanic II’ will sail in 2016

'The Great Gatsby' trailer: Baz Lurhmann's take on the classic novel looks as gonzo as you expected

One thing you can count on with Baz Luhrmann: The man sure knows how to spin cultural anachronisms to his favor. The trailer for his latest — an adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s seminal novel of roaring wealth and excess in 1922 New York City — opens with a cut from Kanye West and Jay-Z’s Watch the Throne, and follows up with an extended cut of Jack White covering U2’s “Love is Blindness.” And yet somehow, it works.

We also get a good sense of the gonzo parties thrown by the enigmatic Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), as well as a few shots of Gatsby making doe eyes at former flame Daisy Buchanan (Carey Mulligan), and Tobey Maguire as Midwestern outsider (and audience proxy) Nick Carraway taking it all in. Curiously, the trailer spends a considerable amount of time with a face less familiar to American audiences — Bollywood star Amitabh Bachchan (as Meyer Wolfsheim) — and also introduces newcomer Elizabeth Debicki (as Jordan Baker).

Mostly, though, this first look at Luhrmann’s take on the high school lit class staple looks to be wildly different than the soporific 1974 adaptation starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, and that is nothing but a good thing. Check it out below: READ FULL STORY

FIRST LOOK: Two photos revealed from Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained' -- EXCLUSIVE

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The song “Unchain My Heart” meant something very different when Jamie Foxx re-created it in 2004’s Ray, but you could argue the title applies in a strange and more sinister way in Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming revenge western Django Unchained.

The bond Foxx wants to break this time around is not a bad romance, but something far uglier and more painful: his slave status in the pre-Civil War South, which is the obstacle preventing him from going in search of his sold-off wife, played by Kerry Washington.

After the jump, Entertainment Weekly debuts the first two photos from the movie, which hits theaters on Dec. 25,  and we also talk with Foxx about this southern-fried take on the spaghetti western.

Does he think Django Unchained will be controversial? “Oh, hell yeah,” Foxx says. “You kidding me?” READ FULL STORY

'Titanic' is a great film. It's also the movie that gave rise to hater culture

James Cameron’s Titanic is one of the most successful movies of all time, and I have no problem saying that it’s also one of the most beloved movies ever made. (We’re now in the era when success doesn’t always hinge on deep fan love; witness The Phantom Menace, the Transformers films, or Khloe Kardashian.) Where Titanic may well be unique in the history of cinema is that it is also, arguably, the most hated beloved movie ever made. Any number of celebrated films, of course, have provoked backlashes. Just think of the strain of carping snootiness that has always gathered, like a pesky mosquito army, around the work of Steven Spielberg (“He’s too sappy! And manipulative!”), or the routine bashing of famous Oscar crowd-pleasers like Marty or Ordinary People or Shakespeare in Love, or my own persistent impatience with the Lord of the Rings trilogy, a wandering-through-the-woods saga that I’ve always found to be as ponderous as it is majestic. READ FULL STORY

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