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Tag: Meryl Streep (11-20 of 55)

Harvey Weinstein on disappointing Oscar showing for 'Osage County': 'I have only myself to blame'

August-Osage-County

One of the Oscar-season’s most anticipated films was August: Osage County, John Wells’ star-studded adaptation of Tracy Lett’s Pulitzer-Prize-winning play. But when it premiered at September’s Toronto Film Festival, it slipped significantly behind the competition, which included Gravity and 12 Years a Slave. Critics, in general, admired the film, but some sniffed at the perceived unrestrained performances, especially Meryl Streep’s unhinged matriarch. Producer Harvey Weinstein later admitted that he rushed the film in order to benefit from the heat of Toronto, a strategy that clearly backfired. Streep and Julia Roberts were nominated for Oscars, but the film was left out of the Best Picture race.

Now, Weinstein concedes he made a mistake, telling Deadline, “I do think we paid a price critically by rushing for Toronto. … I watched how David O. [Russell] and Marty [Scorsese] took the time they needed on their films, and imposed their strong will and vision in films that came out when they were ready. I have only myself to blame for pushing John Wells to try and be ready for a festival. It was my call, and it was not the right call.” READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Meryl Streep joins women's-rights drama 'Suffragette'; Plus, Ben Kingsley, more

• Meryl Streep (August: Osage County) is in talks to play political activist Emmeline Pankhurst in the upcoming women’s rights drama Suffragette, which also stars Inside Llewyn DavisCary Mulligan. Sarah Gavron (Brick Lane) will helm the drama about a woman named Maud (Mulligan) who becomes an instrumental figure to the early feminist movement. [The Wrap] READ FULL STORY

The Criterion Collection's Wes Anderson-approved 'Fantastic Mr. Fox' -- VIDEO

The folks at The Criterion Collection are sorcerers.

Sure, we rely on them to restore and pen beautiful essays about rare or long forgotten triumphs of cinema, but even their work with new releases can leave us awestruck. They have a way of making the already transcendent that much more special, and their upcoming release of Wes Anderson’s stop-motion charmer Fantastic Mr. Fox looks no different.

The three-disc release (out Feb. 18) features a gallery of Roald Dahl’s original manuscripts, an audio recording of him reading his book, puppet animation tests, and the somewhat standard, but no less fascinating, behind the scenes footage of George Clooney, Meryl Streep, Jason Schwartzman, and the rest of the cast who helped bring the story to life.

Check out the trailer after the jump.

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'The Giver': First Look at Jeff Bridges and Brenton Thwaites in Lois Lowry's classic

Jeff Bridges has been trying to make Lois Lowry’s 1993 classic The Giver into a film for nearly 20 years. In that time, his kids became adults, his father Lloyd, who he’d wanted to play the Giver, died, and he got rejection after rejection from everybody in town till Harvey Weinstein came along.

“He said, yeah let’s go man,” laughs Bridges, who took on the role of the Giver and is serving as a producer on the film (out Aug. 15), which recently wrapped its Cape Town shoot. Australian newcomer Brenton Thwaites plays Jonas, a boy living contentedly in a seemingly perfect community of sterilized, controlled “sameness” till he is assigned to receive all the memories of history — sublime and evil alike — from the Giver (pictured above in the Library of Memory — a set specifically constructed for the film on location in an old factory in Cape Town).

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Casting Net: Harvey Weinstein, Meryl Streep team up for anti-NRA film; Plus, Jason Lee, more

• Meryl Streep (August: Osage County) is set to go face to face with the NRA gun lobby in The Weinstein Company’s upcoming film, The Senator’s Wife. Harvey Weinstein confirmed Streep’s involvement in the anti-NRA film on The Howard Stern Show, saying, the NRA “is going to wish they weren’t alive after I’m done with them.” According to Deadline the upcoming film will focus on a behind-the-scenes account of how the NRA uses its influence with politicians to defeat the legislation that would have required more extensive background checks on gun sales. [Deadline]
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Golden Globes: Party Report! Inside scoop from all the after-ceremony festivities

EW is inside all the Golden Globes parties tonight. Check out our reports from inside all the carousing and celebrating. Check back often for updates and follow us on Twitter at #EWglobes.
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Meryl Streep 'wins' National Board of Review Awards, takes swipes at Disney

The National Board of Review announced its 2013 honorees on Dec. 4, with Her, Nebraska, and Fruitvale Station claiming some of the top prizes. That meant the only real suspense last night at the organization’s New York City gala was who would win the crowd and earn the best howls. Rob Reiner nearly stole the show, but it was Meryl Streep who brought down the house at Cipriani’s on 42nd Street. Streep, presenting the Best Actress award to Emma Thompson for Saving Mr. Banks, left her friend “nauseous with gratitude” with a heart-felt introduction that also took swipes at Walt Disney and the Disney brand. READ FULL STORY

'August: Osage County' trailer: 'You don't get a vote in who's in your family' -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Family drama — just in time for the holidays.

In August: Osage Country, the star-studded adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning play about an Oklahoma family “marinating in its own miserablism,” as EW’s Owen Gleiberman referred to the plot in his review at the Toronto Film Festival, Meryl Streep portrays an aging matriarch presiding over her husband’s funeral. When her grown daughters — Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, and Julianne Nicholson — return home, verbal sparks fly as long-brewing conflicts and resentments come to a head.

In an exclusive trailer, below, check out press conference highlights from Streep, Roberts, and director John Wells about how the film came together. “You don’t get a vote in who’s in your family,” Streep explains in the clip. “And that is the story.”
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Julia Roberts attacks Meryl Streep in 'August: Osage County' poster -- PHOTO

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Home is where the heart is.

That sounds so much better than “Home is where the bile ducts are,” but the latter anatomical metaphor seems better suited to August: Osage County, the star-studded adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer-winning play about an Oklahoma family “marinating in its own miserablism,” as EW’s Owen Gleiberman so aptly phrased it.

In the film, which arrives on Christmas Day, Meryl Streep plays the harpyish matriarch who presides over her husband’s funeral — he committed suicide — and drives her three daughters up the wall. Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, and Julianne Nicholson play the daughters, who all drag their own adult baggage back into their childhood house.

Norman Rockwell would spit-take on his canvas when he sees the “family photo” that serves as the film’s poster.

Click below for the film’s trailer, which showcases the amazing supporting cast of Ewan McGregor, Chris Cooper, Abigail Breslin, Benedict Cumberbatch, Margo Martindale, Dermot Mulroney, Sam Shepard, and Misty Upham. READ FULL STORY

Toronto 2013: 'August: Osage County' is a feisty revel in family darkness

When a movie is based on a celebrated Broadway play, the first question you want to ask is pretty basic: Does it play? In the case of August: Osage County, an adaptation of Tracy Letts’ 2007 Pulitizer Prize-winning stage drama about a feisty Oklahoma family marinating in its own miserablism, the answer is a resounding yes. The fights and insults and sadistic parent-child mind games, the disease and addiction, the decades’ worth of gnarled domestic resentments, the powerhouse acting that sometimes shades into overacting (though in this case I’ll be damned if you could the draw the line)…the movie is red meat for anyone who thrives on confrontation and a certain brand of punchy, in-your-face emotional shock value. Yet the pull of what was happening on screen came, for me, with a major qualification: I went with it, I often enjoyed it, but I didn’t entirely buy it. As a play, August: Osage County might have been designed to make every last person who sees it think: “Thank God for my family! Looking at these raging Middle American crazies, I never realized how much I had to be grateful for!” Which is to say: The film, directed with head-on prosaic craft by John Wells (who made the very sharp downsizing drama The Company Men), is an extremely canny theatrical contraption that spreads its darkness like whipped butter on a roll. Is it a good movie? Let’s call it the feel-good feel-bad domestic snake-pit melodrama of the year. READ FULL STORY

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