Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Michael Fassbender (1-10 of 54)

Ridley Scott and 'Green Lantern' scribe readying 'Prometheus 2' for 2016

Prometheus 2 — or a Prometheus sequel by some other name — might be in theaters as soon as March 4, 2016.

On Friday, Fox announced plans to release an untitled Ridley Scott movie on that date, and yesterday, The Wrap reported that Green Lantern writer Michael Green was re-writing the Prometheus 2 script with that target date in mind. (Green and Scott are also collaborating on a Blade Runner sequel.)

Production could begin on Prometheus 2 as soon as this fall, after Scott finishes his Moses film, Exodus, starring Christian Bale. According to the report, Michael Fassbender will return for the sequel, as the script calls for multiple android “David”s.

20th Century Fox confirmed that Green was now working on the script. Scott did not immediately respond to EW’s request for comment.

'Frank' trailer: Michael Fassbender covers up with giant, fake head -- VIDEO

Frank.jpg

Michael Fassbender plays a musical genius who can’t seem to face life “face on” in the film Frank.

The offbeat comedy directed by Lenny Abrahamson premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival and tells the story of the avant-garde pop band led by the mysterious and enigmatic Frank (Fassbender) as they travel to perform at the South by Southwest Festival in Texas. Domhnall Gleeson and Maggie Gyllenhaal star as Frank’s bandmates. The story, written by Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare At Goats) and Peter Straughan (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), is loosely inspired by Frank Sidebottom, the persona of cult musician and comedy legend Chris Sievey, as well as other outsider musicians like Daniel Johnston and Captain Beefheart.

The film will be released in the U.K. May 9, with a domestic release planned for later this year. Watch the trailer below: READ FULL STORY

'Love is Strange' and 'Frank' both get post-Sundance deals

After premiering at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, two films have been acquired for theatrical release.

Sony Pictures Classics announced Friday that they have acquired all North American, German, and Scandinavian rights to Ira Sachs’ feature Love Is Strange starring John Lithgow and Alfred Molina as a longtime couple who lose their New York City home shortly after getting married and, as a result, must live apart, relying on friends and family to make ends meet. “Filmmaker Ira Sachs, one of our most acute observers of humanity in modern times, has made his most accomplished film featuring two of the greatest actors in the English speaking world at the peak of their form. It is a privilege to collaborate with them on releasing Love Is Strange,” Sony Pictures Classics said in a statement. The all-star cast also includes Marisa Tomei, Darren Burrows, Charlie Tahan, and Cheyenne Jackson.

The Wagner/Cuban Company’s Magnolia Pictures also announced Friday that they have acquired North American rights to Frank, an offbeat comedy directed by Lenny Abrahamson and written by Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare at Goats) and Peter Straughan (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy). Frank stars Domhnall Gleeson, Maggie Gylenhaal, Scoot McNairy, and Michael Fassbender as the titular character, a brilliant and eccentric musician who wears a giant fake head at all times.

“All of us at Magnolia were completely taken with Frank,” said Magnolia President Eamonn Bowles. “It reaffirms the considerable talents of Lenny Abrahamson, who has delivered a beautiful, poignant, and hilarious film that speaks on many levels about being an artist. That Michael Fassbender can be so affecting while encased in a papier-mâché head proves that he is one of the greatest actors working today.” Magnolia is eyeing a summer 2014 theatrical release for the film.

'Frank' star Maggie Gyllenhaal joins Michael Fassbender's head at EW Sundance Lounge

SUNDANCE-FRANK.jpg

Director Lenny Abrahamson and his stars Maggie Gyllenhaal and Scoot McNairy came by EW’s Sundance Lounge Saturday to talk about their movie Frank, which also stars Michael Fassbender as a musical genius… wearing a giant ceramic head… the entire film.

Fassbender himself couldn’t make it, but we did get to spend time with the head. Check out the video interview below. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Kristen Stewart as a Guantanamo guard? I didn't buy it

On Entourage, Vincent Chase would do his dumb-whore popcorn movies (like Aqua-Man) and feel humiliated, but the truth is that he rarely looked more hapless than when he was making one of his “integrity” projects — like his Pablo Escobar biopic, or the I’m-just-Vinnie-from-the-block indie Queens Boulevard, which wound up getting showcased at Sundance. If Entourage wasn’t about Vincent Chase but was about Kristen Stewart instead, her Escobar-meets-Queens Boulevard wince-worthy integrity dud might be Camp X-Ray, in which Stewart plays a guard at Guantanamo Bay who winds up uncovering the big lie of American anti-terrorist policy by making friends with one of the prison camp’s detainees. Has he been unjustly imprisoned? Maybe, but as the film sees it, the real injustice is that he’s been locked up with no end in sight, and he’s nice. READ FULL STORY

Sundance 2014: Michael Fassbender, Nick Offerman, and Roger Ebert headline Premieres

The Sundance Film Festival announced the titles selected to screen in its out-of-competition Premieres and Documentary Premieres sections. Last year, the movies that were launched in these categories — which typically highlight filmmakers who’ve appeared at Sundance before — included Before Midnight, Don Jon, and The Way Way Back; this year appears to be just as promising. In Lynn Shelton’s Laggies, a young woman stuck in arrested-development (Keira Knightley) has her life upended by an unexpected marriage proposal. In David Wain’s They Came Together — surely, a naughty pun, yes? — Wet Hot American Summer alums Amy Poehler and Paul Rudd reunite for Wain’s satire of what seems to be a Woody Allen romantic-comedy. Poehler’s Parks and Recreation co-star Nick Offerman takes center stage for his own concert film, Nick Offerman: American Ham. “He’s very much a storyteller and humorist,” says Sundance’s director of programming Trevor Groth. “It actually has not just laughter, but some emotion, in terms of his views on life and love.”

But the slate isn’t just comedies. (This is Sundance after all.) Michael Shannon and Nicholas Hoult star in Jake Paltrow’s Young Ones, a genre-bender “that’s really a Western in its form and function,” says Sundance’s director John Cooper.

For those of you hoping to see Michael Fassbender in a Sundance movie, you’re in luck… aaand you’re out of luck. Fassbender plays a musical genius in Lenny Abrahamson’s movie, Frank. “His character wears a giant ceramic head the entire film, so you’ve got this [actor] who can basically take any film role out there and he takes one where he hides his face,” says Cooper. “A brave choice from someone who’s known for his brave choices.”

At least Ryan Reynolds has the good taste to be in a Sundance movie that doesn’t hide his face (or trap him in a coffin). That’s not to say his character in Marjane Satrapi’s The Voices doesn’t have some baggage. Reynolds plays a mentally unbalanced factory drone whose attempts at office romance don’t work out. When things turn unexpectedly violent, he begins to hear the voices of his pets as they advise him what to do next. “It’s a jolt,” says Groth. “[Ryan] does something really inventive. Believe me, the talking cats and dogs are the least of your problems in this movie.”

As always, some of the festivals most promising movies are documentaries. Rory Kennedy (Ethel) returns to Park City with the Last Days of Vietnam, which investigates the U.S. orders to evacuate only American personnel, leaving behind loyal South Vietnamese as Saigon fell to the Communists. Amir Bar-Lev digs deep into Happy Valley to investigate the culture that enabled Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky to abuse countless youths. Steve James, who directed Hoop Dreams, chronicles the career of the late Roger Ebert in Life Itself.

Mitt Romney will also make an appearance of sorts. The former Salt Lake City Olympics CEO and presidential candidate is the subject of a documentary from Greg Whitely, simply titled Mitt. “It gave me a whole new sort of perspective on politicians and what they have to go through,” says Cooper. “Just the rigor if it, and how the family has to be part of this process.”

One potential breakout documentary is The Battered Bastards of Baseball, the true story of the Portland Mavericks, an independent minor-league baseball team founded by actor Bing Russell in the 1970s. “He put together this team that ended up being this great David versus Goliath, Bad News Bears story of these rag-tag group of players that became winners,” says Groth. “Kurt Russell was there as a young guy following the team around and [Little Children director] Todd Field was the bat-boy. It’s just an amazing story and I think it’s going to be a real crowd-pleaser.”

Click below for Sundance’s complete listing of Premieres. READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Channing Tatum in talks for 'Bad Romance'; Plus, Michael Fassbender, Bill Murray, more

Magic Mike star Channing Tatum is in early talks to produce and star in Bad Romance for writer and director Jonathan Levine (50/50). No details about the plot were revealed. Tatum can be seen next in Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, recently bumped to a 2014 release, and 22 Jump Street. He also voices the part of Superman in The Lego Movie. [THR]

READ FULL STORY

Michael Fassbender won't campaign for '12 Years' Oscar nom: 'I won't put myself through that kind of situation again'

When the camera is on, Michael Fassbender is one of the most convincing and compelling actors working. In 12 Years a Slave, he’s terrifying as the morally depraved Edwin Epps, a plantation owner who abuses his slaves in every possible way. But when his work is done, his work is done. At least that’s what the 36-year-old Irishman has decided when it comes to the Oscar campaigns that will inevitably follow 12 Years‘ release on Oct. 18. “I won’t put myself through that kind of situation again,” Fassbender tells GQ. “It’s just a grind. And I’m not a politician. I’m an actor.” READ FULL STORY

'12 Years a Slave' has special homecoming at New York Film Festival

12 Years a Slave premiered at Telluride and was crowned the presumptive Oscar frontrunner in Toronto, but its screening at the New York Film Festival last night was a special sort of homecoming. The movie, based on an 1853 memoir, tells the story of a free black New Yorker from Saratoga named Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) who is kidnapped and trafficked into Southern slavery, and some of Northup’s descendants came to Manhattan from upstate to view the film with the Lincoln Center audience.

Since Toronto, director Steve McQueen’s movie has been celebrated as “slavery’s Schindler’s List,” the most unflinching and intimate study of our country’s most shameful sin. While Roots was a huge cultural television event in the 1970s and Quentin Tarantino had his own stylistic take on slavery in Django Unchained, few Hollywood films had put slavery under the microscope. “It’s obviously a very difficult historical moment that happened in America — hugely shameful, hugely painful,” McQueen said after the screening. “Previously [in Hollywood], obviously it was very very difficult and it was stuck somehow. But with the situation of Trayvon Martin, with having the first black president, the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery, 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, it’s created this kind of perfect storm where there’s a thirst to sort of reconnect with that past, to see where one’s going, and to see where one’s at.” READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Adam Sandler gets serious; Plus Kristin Chenoweth, Michael Fassbender

• Funnyman Adam Sandler may be reprising his serious side, seen seldomly in movies like 2002′s Punch Drunk Love. He’s in talks to join The Cobbler, an indie drama directed by Tom McCarthy (The Station Agent, The Visitor). Details are under wraps, but THR reports the film tells the tale of a shoemaker who is able to, well, step into other people’s shoes, so to speak. [THR]
READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP