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'Jurassic World': See Chris Pratt ride with some raptors -- exclusive

It’s never an easy walk in Jurassic Park. In fact, guests typically end up running like hell. The fourth installment of Universal’s biggest franchise is no exception. Opening in theaters June 12, World is set 22 years after the original film. The dino-themed amusement park on Isla Nubla has been thriving for years, yielding four-star restaurants (hello, Nobu!) and beautiful resorts.

But in an effort to create new buzz and boost attendance, a hybrid dino is hatched—and that’s when the island’s human population, including dino researcher Owen (Chris Pratt), park operations manager Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard), and her two young nephews (Nick Robinson and Ty Sympkins), are sent sprinting in terror. “There are dinosaurs and there’s the other—there’s this thing that is not one of them, that is not of them,” teases director Colin Trevvorow (Safety Not Guranteed), who was specifically picked by Park director (and World executive producer) Steven Spielberg. Trevorrow adds, “There’s a lot of bold new ideas in the movie and I’m pushing it as far forward as I can. I know Steven didn’t want me to make a carbon copy of the earlier films. So we’re going for it.” READ FULL STORY

10 Things You Need to Know About 'Pitch Perfect 2'

EW’s latest cover is an all-access, exclusive peek behind the scenes of next summer’s highly anticipated musical comedy Pitch Perfect 2. The movie takes place 3 years after the first film, with the Barden Bellas ruling the collegiate a cappella world. But then something happens. “They are prohibited—and I won’t say why—from competing at the collegiate level,” says director Elizabeth Banks, who produced the original and appears again as judge Gail. “So they are sort of forced to enter a professional world competition in order to be reinstated.” Here’s what else you need to know about PP2. READ FULL STORY

Nick Damici talks about werewolf movie 'Late Phases' and 'Hap and Leonard'

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How did actor Nick Damici prepare to play a blind army vet in the new werewolf movie Late Phases? Painfully, it seems.

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'Mean Girls' reunion: Could there be a sequel -- and which stars would be up for it?

It’s been a decade since Mean Girls was released, but affection for the film only seems to get stronger with each passing year. Tina Fey has already announced that a stage musical is in development—but could the Plastics ever team up for another big-screen outing? (Paramount did release a straight-to-DVD sequel in 2011.)

For our Reunions issue, on stands now, EW asked each actress—as well as Fey—whether they’d want to revisit the Girls. READ FULL STORY

EW's 'Mean Girls' reunion: The cast looks back on the 2004 hit

One sure sign of a film’s legacy: Does it inspire its own holiday?

If you happened to be anywhere near the Internet on Oct. 3, you probably noticed an outpouring of nostalgia for 2004’s Mean Girls. The reason? A throwaway line uttered by Lindsay Lohan’s Cady: “It’s October 3rd.”

That may seem a pretty slim thread to hang an entire day on, but it’s indicative of the fervent fan base for this new-classic teen comedy. Written by Tina Fey and directed by Mark Waters (Vampire Academy), Mean Girls stars Lohan as a high school student at a new school who infiltrates the Plastics, a group of nasty popular girls led by queen bee Regina (Rachel McAdams) and her underlings: insecure Gretchen (Lacey Chabert) and dumb-as-a-stump Karen (Amanda Seyfried). The film became a surprise sleeper hit, earning $129 million worldwide and gaining an even bigger following on DVD. In the decade since, Mean Girls has joined Clueless and Sixteen Candles in the teen-comedy canon.

For its 10th anniversary, EW invited the film’s female leads to our own little pep rally, where they talked about their memories, behind-the-scenes magic, and what they think their characters would be doing now. READ FULL STORY

'Refuge' director talks about his pandemic apocalypse movie

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In the new independent horror movie Refuge, Carter Roy, Amy Rutberg, and young actress Eva Grace Kellner play a family trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world where the population has been almost entirely wiped out by disease. Given recent, panic-causing news events, the film could hardly be more topical. So what is it like to have made a movie about a global pandemic just as people are reaching for their face masks? “It’s incredibly coincidental that it’s peaking right now,” says Refuge director Andrew Robertson, whose film recently played the Toronto After Dark and L.A.-based Screamfest genre festivals. “It’s certainly not something that we would want to exploit. The particular nature of this extinction event just happens to be a plague. But there are so many other things that we have anxiety about: nuclear war, or asteroids hitting the earth, or climate change.” And a “Happy Halloween!” to you too, sir!

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Box office preview: 'Ouija' faces off against 'John Wick'

Keanu Reeves, once one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars, will be competing against a board game thriller this weekend as John Wick opens against Ouija. In this case, it looks like the teen screamers might have the edge despite the overall stellar reviews for Reeves’ revenge picthe latest R-rated film to hit a particularly crowded market. St. Vincent also expands nationwide after playing for two weeks in limited release, but its unlikely to crack the top five.

Here’s how things might play out:

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John Cleese denies retirement reports

John Cleese says movie casting directors should not be put off from hiring him by recent reports that the Monty Python comedy legend is retiring from films.

“Sometimes you read these things and you say, ‘I don’t remember saying that,'” explains Cleese, 74, whose acting credits include fellow Python Terry Gilliam’s 1981 film Time Bandits, 1988’s Cleese-written A Fish Called Wanda, and two of the Harry Potter films. “What I would say is, when you get to my age, the number of parts that you get offered is very, very small. They’re not looking for 75-year-old comedians most of the time. I have been offered a large part in a movie which, if they get the finance together, will happen in the spring. But that doesn’t happen a lot. What I did say is that I don’t enjoy movies very much. Terry Gilliam, who has nothing better to do with his life, loves to have movies because it structures him and gives him a purpose, which otherwise he lacks. I don’t like the way that they take your life over.”

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Meet the female producers smashing Hollywood's glass ceiling

Q. What do Lincoln, E.T., The Color Purple, War of the Worlds, Jurassic Park, 12 Years a Slave, Eat Pray Love, A Mighty Heart, World War Z, Jane Eyre, Saving Mr. Banks, Proof, Elizabeth, The Master, American Hustle, Zero Dark Thirty, Her, The Dark Knight, Man of Steel, Inception, Hustle & Flow, The Hunger Games, Monsters, Inc., A Bug’s Life, and Toy Story 3 have in common?

A. They were all produced by women.

Look around. Female producers are everywhere: Shepherding the new Star Wars trilogy. Bringing the latest Hunger Games to theaters. And in February, when Oscar night rolls around, 11 women could be competing to take the stage when the Best Picture prize is announced.

It’s an impressive—and improbable—feat. The large number of successful female producers working on Hollywood’s most important films today belies some pretty depressing statistics: According to a 2012 study conducted by the Los Angeles Times, women make up only 18 percent of the producers’ branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. READ FULL STORY

Leonardo DiCaprio's Appian Way and Langley Park eye 'American Wolf'

No, American Wolf is not a follow-up to The Wolf of Wall Street. It’s actually a tale of the female alpha wolf (the “06”) who’d captivated the scientific and tourist community only to be shot by a hunter outside of Yellowstone National Park in 2012, and Leonardo DiCaprio’s production banner Appian Way is teaming up with Kevin McCormick’s Langley Park to secure the film rights, sources tell EW. The deal is not closed yet, though.

Nate Blakeslee, a Senior Editor at Texas Monthly, sold his book proposal for the story earlier this week for a reported seven-figures. According to The Hollywood Reporter, it inspired some enthusiastic bidding between various production companies, including New Regency and ImageMovers.

The story will focus on the impact Wolf 832F, or 06 (called that because she was born in 2006), had on the humans around her, the business of wolf-watching at Yellowstone, and the public outrage at the hunter, whom Blakeslee was able to track down.

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