Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Movie Biz (1-10 of 2800)

Leonardo DiCaprio's Appian Way and Langley Park eye 'American Wolf'

No, American Wolf is not a follow-up to The Wolf of Wall Street. It’s actually a tale of the female alpha wolf (the “06”) who’d captivated the scientific and tourist community only to be shot by a hunter outside of Yellowstone National Park in 2012, and Leonardo DiCaprio’s production banner Appian Way is teaming up with Kevin McCormick’s Langley Park to secure the film rights, sources tell EW. The deal is not closed yet, though.

Nate Blakeslee, a Senior Editor at Texas Monthly, sold his book proposal for the story earlier this week for a reported seven-figures. According to The Hollywood Reporter, it inspired some enthusiastic bidding between various production companies, including New Regency and ImageMovers.

The story will focus on the impact Wolf 832F, or 06 (called that because she was born in 2006), had on the humans around her, the business of wolf-watching at Yellowstone, and the public outrage at the hunter, whom Blakeslee was able to track down.

Box office preview: Denzel Washington eyes top spot with 'The Equalizer'

Denzel Washington is gearing up to show his box office might once more as The Equalizer debuts in 3,234 theaters, including IMAX and other premium large format screens, starting with early Thursday-night showings. The R-rated Columbia Pictures action thriller, which re-teams Washington with his Training Day director Antoine Fuqua, will easily win the weekend, beating out last week’s champ The Maze Runner and this week’s other new opener, the family-friendly The Boxtrolls.

Here’s how things might play out:

READ FULL STORY

FAA grants permission for filmmakers to use drones (Updated)

UPDATE: This afternoon the FAA announced it has granted regulatory exemptions to six of the seven aerial film production companies that applied for permits after finding they don’t threaten national airspace security. (It requires more information from the seventh company.)

“Today’s announcement is a significant milestone in broadening commercial UAS [unmanned aircraft systems] use while ensuring we maintain our world-class safety record in all forms of flight,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Secretary Anthony Foxx on a conference call with an FAA administrator and MPAA CEO Chris Dodd.

The press release also notes that the FAA is currently “considering 40 requests for exemptions from other commercial entities.”

READ FULL STORY

Jon Favreau on 'Chef's' box-office success and the power of social media

Jon Favreau admits to being a bit obsessive when it comes to box-office results, as any good blockbuster director should be. “That’s the ultimate scorecard for whether you get to make more movies or not,” he told EW Tuesday night at an event for his latest film Chef, a small-budget pic about an influential chef who goes back to his roots by opening a food truck.

After opening on just six screens in early May, the film gained momentum throughout the summer, sticking around for over 18 weeks. Chef‘s $45.9 million worldwide earnings might seem paltry compared to, say, Iron Man‘s $98.6 million opening weekend, but of course in box-office terms, it’s all relative. Based on Chef‘s modest production budget and minimal marketing, Favreau’s return to indies after nearly a decade of trafficking in big-budget tent poles was a runaway success.

“People came back and saw it over and over, which meant that I connected with people who felt passionately about the film,” said Favreau. “There was not one billboard for the movie. Everything was from word of mouth. That was what was exciting. Much like the food truck in the movie, its success owed itself to the people who were reacting to what we were doing.” Favreau attributes a lot of that buzz to the “power of social media,” likening its ability to help an indie find its footing to its ability to bolster the stature of anything from stand-ups to food trucks.

READ FULL STORY

Women still severely underrepresented in film, study finds

Despite efforts to promote gender equality, women are still severely underrepresented in the film industry, according to a new study from the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media.

In a study by USC Annenberg titled “Gender Bias Without Borders,” researchers analyzed the quantity and quality of female roles in 120 of the world’s most popular movies from 2010-2013 (specifically, the top-grossing non R-rated releases in the 10 countries with the biggest film industries). They found that gender inequality is “rampant” in films worldwide and that “not one country is anywhere near representing reality.”

Moviegoers in the combined U.S./U.K. market saw over three times as many men as women onscreen— with women making up just 23.6 percent of the 5,799 speaking roles. And good luck finding a female hero in any country: Fewer than one in four of the films featured a female lead or co-lead.

When ladies are on the big screen, it’s often about the way they look. The study found that female roles — especially characters between the ages of 13 and 20 — are highly sexualized and objectified, with women over twice as likely as men to be shown partially or fully nude, or wearing sexually revealing clothing. Additionally, men in movies frequently talk about the appearance of their female counterparts, with over five times as many comments about physical appearance directed at female characters than male.

But what we see on the screen begins behind the camera—where there are four men for every women, researchers found. Movies directed or written/co-written by a woman, however, had 6.8 percent and 7.8 percent more female characters, respectively.

Of course, the real world hasn’t achieved gender equality, either— but it is much more representative than the ones we create in L.A. backlots. When did movie magic become the act of making women disappear?

Bryan Singer officially signs on to direct 'X-Men: Apocalypse'

Director Bryan Singer will officially return to the X-Men franchise. EW has confirmed that Singer, who directed X-Men, X2, and this summer’s X-Men: Days of Future Past, has just closed a deal to direct the latest installment in the Marvel mutant series, X-Men: Apocalypse. It had been unclear whether or not this would be the case after Singer was accused in April of sexual abuse by former actor Michael Egan; Egan eventually dropped his suit in late August.

X-Men: Apocalypse is set for release on May 27, 2016 and Singer told EW in the spring that it would follow younger versions of Xavier (James McAvoy), Erik (Michael Fassbender), and Raven (Jennifer Lawrence), and perhaps the additions of Nightcrawler and Gambit (Channing Tatum has been reportedly set as the Cajun hero). Said Singer, “I’m excited because I want to start introducing familiar characters at different ages and also explore the ‘80s.”

'London Has Fallen' loses its director

London Has Fallen is down a director.

Fredrik Bond, a commercial director who also helmed the Shia LaBeouf pic Charlie Countryman, has stepped down from the project, EW confirmed Thursday.

The sequel to 2013’s box office hit Olympus Has Fallen was set to begin shooting in just six weeks, with original cast members Gerard Butler and Morgan Freeman set to return. According to The Hollywood Reporter, who first reported the news, the split was due to creative differences that may have stemmed from the accelerated production schedule. Bond only boarded the project in August.

READ FULL STORY

Ang Lee will direct 'Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk'

Ang Lee never met a literary adaptation he couldn’t tackle, it seems. The multi-Oscar winner, who’s been largely absent since winning Best Director for Life of Pi, has picked his next project: Ben Fountain’s celebrated 2012 novel Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, about a group of Iraq war vets, including 19-year-old Billy Lynn, who must endure a Thanksgiving Day football game in Texas on their exhaustive “Victory Tour” before they return to the war. TriStar Productions and Film4 announced the news Thursday.

“I am very excited to be going back to work and to be collaborating with my old friend Tom Rothman,” Lee said in a statement. “The most important thing to me is storytelling and Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk is a story that immediately gripped me. I look forward to starting the creative process with this extraordinary team of collaborators.”

Lee collaborated with Tom Rothman during his Fox days to bring the “unfilmableLife of Pi to the big screen. The film went on to win four Oscars and gross over $600 million worldwide.

Rothman, now at TriStar, is credited with orchestrating the deal with Lee. “Ang Lee is constitutionally incapable of repeating himself.  His very DNA requires him to always find new challenges.  ‘More of the same’ may be the film fashion these days, but thankfully not for this exceptional artist,” he said in a statement. “Ang Lee’s Billy Lynn will be a true original, and TriStar is in the business of investing in originality, here combined with innovation. Big movies come from such combinations, as witness Life of Pi.”

Ink Factory’s Stephen Cornwell, Rhodri Thomas and Simon Cornwell, and Film4 (who first optioned the book) will produce the film along with Lee. Simon Beaufoy, who won an Oscar for adapting Slumdog Millionaire, wrote the script and production is planning on a Spring start.

Box office preview: 'Maze Runner' teens prepare to battle Liam Neeson

Dylan O’Brien and his fellow gladers face off against Liam Neeson at the box office this weekend as The Maze Runner opens alongside A Walk Among the Tombstones. But, it looks like the teens will triumph in the end.

The star-packed This is Where I Leave you also opens in about 2,868 locations this weekend, as well as a number of smaller releases, including the Kevin Smith horror pic Tusk, the Dan Stevens-led thriller The Guest, the fact-based Tracks, and Terry Gilliam’s sci-fi pic The Zero Theorem. And if you’re a die hard Dan Stevens or Adam Driver fan, both have two movies debuting.

Here’s how things might play out.

READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'No Good Deed' is No. 1, 'Guardians' passes $300 million

They might be enemies in No Good Deed, but the combined star power of Idris Elba and Taraji P. Henson helped the thriller take control of the box office this weekend. No Good Deed opened in first place with an impressive $24.5 million from 2,175 locations.

Even though mid-week tracking predicted a mid-teens opening for the $13 million pic, this debut wasn’t exactly a surprise for Screen Gems. “We really felt we were going to win. We felt we were in the zone and had a film that people were really going to like,” Rory Bruer, Sony’s president of worldwide distribution, tells EW. “We were always very high on the film and felt that it would really work. When you put all the elements togethergreat casting with Idris and Taraji, and this very, very suspenseful, taut thriller that Sam Miller deliveredit worked really well.”

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP