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Lauren Bacall dead at 89

She looked so terrific and strong for such a long time that it was easy to imagine Lauren Bacall might just hang around forever. And who wouldn’t want her to, for the pleasure of hearing her firing off smart, unvarnished remarks about old Hollywood in that husky voice? But the end came at last on Tuesday, when the 89-year-old actress died from a stroke at her home, according to a report on TMZ. The Humphrey Bogart Estate followed with this tweet: “With deep sorrow, yet with great gratitude for her amazing life, we confirm the passing of Lauren Bacall.”

Whether she was trading double entendres with Humphrey Bogart, hawking freeze-dried instant coffee in a TV commercial, or taking a punch as a guest star on The Sopranos, Bacall had no equal at projecting an insolent, imperious, sexy, and slightly impish personality. (Okay, maybe Kathleen Turner came close for a while.) Was Bacall a great, rangy actress? No, but she was a lanky, electrifying presence, and a champion movie and stage star. READ FULL STORY

Adrian Garcia Bogliano starts shooting black comedy 'Scherzo Diabolico'

Scherzo-Diabolico

Director Adrián García Bogliano has yet to release his most recently completed film, the werewolf tale Late Phases. But EW can reveal that the prolific filmmaker has commenced principal photography on his next movie in Mexico City. The film is called Scherzo Diabolico and, according to the official release, it “brings Bogliano back from the supernatural realm to a wild black comedy about a bored and frustrated accountant who decides to kidnap a girl who will become his worst nightmare.”

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Box office report: 'Turtles' tops 'Guardians' with $65 million

Turtle Power does exist after all. The heroes in a half shell surpassed industry and analyst expectations by more than $20 million, raking in an estimated $65 million in its first weekend in theaters. With an additional $28.7 million from 19 international territories, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, which cost $125 million to produce, has earned $93.7 million globally. No wonder Paramount has already announced plans for a summer 2016 sequel.

The Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies pic may not have resonated with the critics, but that didn’t seem to matter much to its target audience: kids. While moviegoers overall slapped the Michael Bay-produced movie with a lackluster B Cinema Score, kids were much more enthusiastic, giving it an A overall. Audiences on the whole were mostly male (61 percent) and a significant portion (45 percent) were under 25 years old.

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'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' sequel set for 2016

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Cowabunga, dude. It looks like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are here to stay. On the heels of a $65 million opening weekend, Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies on Sunday announced plans for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2, with a release date of June 3, 2016.

Michael Bay will return to produce with his Platinum Dunes partners, and Turtles writing team Josh Appelbaum and André Nemec are on board to pen the sequel script and executive produce. The statement did not specify whether or not Jonathan Liebesman would return to direct.

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Box office update: 'Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' rocket to No. 1

It looks like a pizza party may be in order.

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles brought in an estimated $25.6 million on its first day in theaters, including $4.6 million from screenings on Thursday night. Though it was widely expected to be in a tight race for No. 1 with Guardians of the Galaxy, TMNT more than doubled the estimated Friday earnings of Marvel’s reigning champ ($12.34 million).

The big opening day puts the $125 million Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies reboot on track to take in around $62 million this weekend, beating analyst and studio estimates of a $40 million start. Audiences were mostly male (61 percent) and age 25 or older (55 percent); they were more receptive to the movie than critics, awarding it a Cinema Score of B, though kids exiting the theaters gave it an A.

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Menahem Golan, prolific producer of '80s action pics, dies at 85

Menahem Golan, best known for producing and directing scores of schlocky ’80s action pics under the Cannon Films banner—including the likes of Bloodsport and some of the Death Wish sequels—died Friday, Haaretz reports. He was 85.

Obsessed with movies from a young age, the Israeli-born Golan got his start working with B-movie master Roger Corman on 1963’s The Young Racers. He eventually teamed up with his cousin Yoram Globus to head up The Cannon Group, a fledgling production company that they bought in 1979. They transformed Cannon into a veritable force in the industry by the mid-’80s, producing testosterone-driven films for the likes of Sean Connery, Chuck Norris, Charles Bronson, Sylvester Stallone, and Jean-Claude Van Damme.

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See two new posters for Antonio Banderas' sci-fi movie 'Automata'

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Antonio Banderas has dabbled in science fiction with The Skin I Live In and the Spy Kids movies. But the Spanish actor goes full-on future-shock in his new film, Automata. Set half a century into the future, the film stars Banderas as an insurance agent who investigates cases of defective androids and, according to the official synopsis, “uncovers a truth that is far more complex than the make or model of any machine.”

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New 'Hunger Games: Mockingjay' posters reveal District 13's army

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The last we heard of Katniss, Plutarch and Haymitch had rescued her from the Hunger Games arena, where she’d learned that not only had District 12 been obliterated, but Peeta had been kidnapped by the Capitol. Now on her way to District 13 for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1, Katniss is headed into battle.

In Mockingjay, viewers will get their first glimpse at District 13, its cast of characters, and those who will stand by Katniss as the Mockingjay. The first teasers for the film have focused on the very white world of the Capitol residents, but in a new roundup of posters for the film, things are looking a little more gray in District 13.

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'Texas Chain Saw Massacre' star Marilyn Burns dies at 65

Marilyn Burns, best known her role in the cult horror film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, died Tuesday at her home in Houston, her manager confirmed to EW. She was 65.

Born in Pennsylvania and raised in Texas, Burns pursued acting throughout her schooling and made her film debut in Robert Altman’s Brewster McCloud while pursing a drama degree at the University of Texas at Austin. She appeared in small parts in other projects, but her breakout wouldn’t come till she landed the role of unlucky teen Sally Hardesty in Tobe Hooper’s bloody 1974 hit The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which remains her most memorable role. Owen Gleiberman, in his review the 2003 remake, wrote of the original: “With the exception of Psycho, it’s the only modern horror movie I can think of that’s as elegant as it is relentless.”

Burns went on to star in Hooper’s Eaten Alive and as Linda Kasabian in the Charles Manson miniseries Helter Skelter. She also made cameo appearances in 1994’s Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation and 2013’s Texas Chainsaw 3D.

Burns’s family has requested privacy at this time.

Read Martin Scorsese's passionate defense of Kodak film

On the heels of Kodak’s decision to continue its production of film stock after finalizing a deal with major Hollywood studios just last week, the venerable Martin Scorsese issued a heartfelt statement in support of the move, writing: “This news is a positive step towards preserving film, the art form we love.”

As the Chair of The Film Foundation, Scorsese recognizes the advantages of HD and the realities of modern movie-making while still enthusiastically embracing the importance of film, not only as a “building block” of the art form but also as something that continues to inform the current aesthetics of movies. “Film is still the best and only time-proven way to preserve movies,” he writes. “We have no assurance that digital informaton (sic) will last, but we know that film will, if properly stored and cared for.”

Read his full statement below.

We have many names for what we do – cinema, movies, motion pictures. And…film. We’re called directors, but more often we’re called filmmakers. Filmmakers. I’m not suggesting that we ignore the obvious: HD isn’t coming, it’s here. The advantages are numerous: the cameras are lighter, it’s much easier to shoot at night, we have many more means at our disposal for altering and perfecting our images. And, the cameras are more affordable: films really can be made now for very little money. Even those of us still shooting on film finish in HD, and our movies are projected in HD. So, we could easily agree that the future is here, that film is cumbersome and imperfect and difficult to transport and prone to wear and decay, and that it’s time to forget the past and say goodbye – really, that could be easily done. Too easily. READ FULL STORY

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