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EW's 'Mean Girls' reunion: The cast looks back on the 2004 hit

One sure sign of a film’s legacy: Does it inspire its own holiday?

If you happened to be anywhere near the Internet on Oct. 3, you probably noticed an outpouring of nostalgia for 2004’s Mean Girls. The reason? A throwaway line uttered by Lindsay Lohan’s Cady: “It’s October 3rd.”

That may seem a pretty slim thread to hang an entire day on, but it’s indicative of the fervent fan base for this new-classic teen comedy. Written by Tina Fey and directed by Mark Waters (Vampire Academy), Mean Girls stars Lohan as a high school student at a new school who infiltrates the Plastics, a group of nasty popular girls led by queen bee Regina (Rachel McAdams) and her underlings: insecure Gretchen (Lacey Chabert) and dumb-as-a-stump Karen (Amanda Seyfried). The film became a surprise sleeper hit, earning $129 million worldwide and gaining an even bigger following on DVD. In the decade since, Mean Girls has joined Clueless and Sixteen Candles in the teen-comedy canon.

For its 10th anniversary, EW invited the film’s female leads to our own little pep rally, where they talked about their memories, behind-the-scenes magic, and what they think their characters would be doing now. READ FULL STORY

First look: Kurt Russell saddles up in 'Bone Tomahawk'

The last time Kurt Russell signed on to appear in a Western the result was 1993’s Tombstone, a film which over time has acquired the reputation as a bona fide classic of the genre as well as one of the movies most quoted whenever poker players get together. (“I’m your huckleberry.”) So it’s hard not to get pretty rootin’-tootin’ excited about the news that, 21 years on, the Escape from New York star has once again saddled up for the just-wrapped Western, Bone Tomahawk.

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The 'Furious 7' trailer is finally here for 'one last ride'

It’s here: the first trailer for the latest entry in the long running film franchise that’s really, at it’s heart, all about family. Furious 7.  Watch it below!

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'Refuge' director talks about his pandemic apocalypse movie

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In the new independent horror movie Refuge, Carter Roy, Amy Rutberg, and young actress Eva Grace Kellner play a family trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world where the population has been almost entirely wiped out by disease. Given recent, panic-causing news events, the film could hardly be more topical. So what is it like to have made a movie about a global pandemic just as people are reaching for their face masks? “It’s incredibly coincidental that it’s peaking right now,” says Refuge director Andrew Robertson, whose film recently played the Toronto After Dark and L.A.-based Screamfest genre festivals. “It’s certainly not something that we would want to exploit. The particular nature of this extinction event just happens to be a plague. But there are so many other things that we have anxiety about: nuclear war, or asteroids hitting the earth, or climate change.” And a “Happy Halloween!” to you too, sir!

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Hollywood ambition turns diabolical in trailer for new horror film 'Starry Eyes'

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How far would you go to become famous? Hopefully not as far as the actress played by Alexandra Essoe in the festival-favorite horror film Starry Eyes, which hits both VOD and select cinemas on Nov. 14.

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'The Babadook' director talks old-school horror

Horror directors these days seem to almost automatically genuflect before the altars of such ’70s and ’80s filmmakers as John Carpenter and Dario Argento. But writer-director Jennifer Kent sought inspiration from much older auteurs while crafting her debut film, the much-acclaimed, Sundance-screened, The Babadook. “I’ve watched everything, from Mario Bava to Dario Argento—all of those ‘70s guys, including John Carpenter, who I love,” she says. “But I feel very drawn also to the early stuff. There were directors in the ’20s and ’30s—Carl Dreyer, Fritz Lang—who were making films that were art and they just happened to be terrifying. I think somewhere along the way we denigrated the art form and horror really has become a dirty word. I think that’s a shame, because it’s really cinematic.”

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'ABCs of Death 2' animated opening is absolutely killer

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Horror anthology sequel ABCs of Death 2 delivers a second slate of 26 fatality-featuring short films overseen by an array of directors, which, this time around, includes Evan Katz (Cheap Thrills), Larry Fessenden (Beneath), Rodney Ascher (Room 237), Jen and Sylvia Soska (American Mary, See No Evil 2), Vincenzo Natali (Cube, Splice), and Julian Barratt, from cult British comedy duo The Mighty Boosh. But one of the film’s highlights comes very early with its opening credit sequence, an animated riff on the children’s books which inspired the franchise in the first place.

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Katniss has a message for President Snow in final 'Mockingjay' trailer

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In the final trailer for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1, fans are once again introduced to the devastation that Katniss is forced to face after her home is destroyed. But more importantly, the new trailer offers a glimpse at some of the book’s key moments, from Peeta’s warning to District 13 to Katniss’ message for President Snow.

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Kevin Feige tells us everything he can on Marvel's Phase Three

Will there be a Black Widow standalone movie? When will we get to see Chadwick Boseman as Black Panther? Which actress will be cast as Captain Marvel? Is Benedict Cumberbatch going to be Doctor Strange?

With Marvel, every major announcement begets a waterfall of followup questions. Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige indulged a group of journalists following Tuesday’s massive information dump (read Anthony Breznican’s play-by-play here) with some teases, some specifics and a whole bunch of misdirects. Here’s what we learned:

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Box office report: 'Ouija' scares up $20 million, 'Citizenfour' opens strong

Ouija, the microbudget, board game-inspired horror pic, came out on top in its opening weekend with a strong (but expected) $20 million showing from 2,858 locations. Meanwhile, Keanu Reeves’ John Wick proved its own strength with a $14.15 million weekend, which doesn’t look all that impressive on its own but is almost double what tracking predicted for the bloody revenge thriller.

Critics may have hated Ouija (even audiences slapped it with a C CinemaScore), but it is a box office truth universally acknowledged that teens will turn out for horror films, no matter how poorly reviewed — especially when they open just days before Halloween. Audiences were a whopping 75 percent under 25, 61 percent female and ethnically mixed. (39 percent of audiences were Hispanic, 31 percent Caucasian, and 12 percent African American.) It also opened in five international territories to $1.3 million and will continue its rollout over the next few months. Ouija cost Blumhouse and Platinum Dunes under $5 million to produce, so no matter what sort of dramatic drop off Ouija might suffer in weekend two, it’s already another micro budget success for Universal and Blumhouse.

“We saw how this film worked with its target audience,” Universal’s President of Domestic Distribution Nikki Rocco told EW. “We watched the tracking for the last three weeks, and there is something to be said for making these microbudget films and making them really, really work. The PG-13 was so smart. It works. PG-13 works. And here are the results.”

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