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Tag: Olympus Has Fallen (1-10 of 11)

Focus Features announces 'Olympus Has Fallen' sequel

Gerard Butler’s secret service agent from Olympus Has Fallen is getting a new mission.

Focus Features has announced its acquisition of U.S. distribution rights to London Has Fallen, the sequel to the 2013 action-thriller. Butler will reprise his hero role in the followup written by Creighton Rothenberger, Katrin Benedikt, and Christian Gudegast.

The film is set in London following the mysterious death of the British prime minister. When dignitaries arrive for his funeral, the event turns into a plot to kill the world’s most powerful leaders. According to a press release, “only three people have any hope of stopping it: the president of the United States, his formidable secret service head (Butler), and an English MI-6 agent who rightly trusts no one.” READ FULL STORY

Dueling Everest movies: Jake Gyllenhaal film begins shooting; Sony's 'The Summit' still in base camp

When it comes to ascending a summit, first to the top usually wins. News this week confirmed that Working Title’s Everest, to be released by Universal, is a go. The film, from director Baltasar Kormákur (2 Guns) began production Monday in Italy, with Jake Gyllenhaal, Josh Brolin, Jason Clarke and John Hawkes playing four of the climbers who attempted the disastrous 1996 ascent of Mount Everest in the Himalayas, only to be thwarted with terrible conditions that led to the loss of many lives.

Now that this film is in production, will it kill a competing Everest film at Sony?

Sony declined to comment on its project, which takes place in the 1920s and chronicles British climber George Mallory’s attempts to scale the world’s tallest mountain. One source close to the production says the studio is still committed to the movie, but the film, which Doug Liman (Mr. and Mrs. Smith) is set to direct after finishing the upcoming Tom Cruise-starrer Edge of Tomorrow, will no longer begin production in the next couple of months as originally planned.

Rather, the start date on the film — which now carries the title The Summit and still has Tom Hardy (Inception) attached to play Mallory and Luke Evans (Fast & Furious 6) to play his Australian rival George Finch — has been pushed to either early summer  or perhaps even to 2015.

According to another source, the studio’s hesitation on the project centers on concern over how to sell the the film domestically. Overseas, the film’s prospects appear much healthier considering the storyline and international cast but in the U.S. audiences are often reluctant to give period films a chance.

Complicating matters, a schedule change may force star Hardy to drop out. As reported earlier, Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) is still interested in the lead role should Hardy need to leave.

Sony is also being more cost conscious after a rough 2013 and launching a $60 million movie with a competing film in the pipeline may not look too appealing. Last summer the studio was on the wrong end of dueling White House disaster movies. Their White House Down with Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx opened at the end of June, earning $73 million. It had followed Film District’s Olympus Has Fallen, which opened in March and grossed $98 million.

Still, sources close to the project says the film, which was scripted by Sheldon Turner (Up in the Air), is still important to the studio.

The trick now is to keep that enthusiasm from falling off the mountain.

Casting Net: Gerard Butler and Aaron Eckhart expected to return for 'Olympus Has Fallen' sequel; Plus, Frank Grillo, more

Olympus Has Fallen may have fizzled critically (EW gave Antoine Fuqua’s action pic a C), but Millennium Films is hoping to get traction on a sequel, called London Has Fallen. The $70 million pic made about $98.9 million domestically for a worldwide total of $161 million. Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, and Morgan Freeman are expected to reprise their roles from the first film. Fuqua (Training Day) will not be returning to direct, but they will use the same screenwriting team from the first film. Shooting on the sequel is already set for May 2014, and the plot will center on a terrorist attack planned during the funeral of the British prime minister. Angela Bassett and Radha Mitchell are also expected to return. [Screen Daily; The Wrap]
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The 15 most impressive box office performances of 2013 -- so far

We’re officially halfway through 2013, and if you’re an obsessive box office junkie like me, that means it’s time to reflect back on the past six months at the movies and give credit to some of the best box office performances so far this year.

By “best,” I don’t simply mean “highest grossing” — you can find that list here – I mean most impressive. Since each movie has its own budget, its own marketing costs, and its own distribution challenges, each movie also has its own standard for success. I like to judge films on their own rubrics — so I have!

This year, there were a lot of close calls. Films like Oz The Great and Powerful and This is the End were this close to making the list (A Good Day to Die Hard and Jack the Giant Slayer, meanwhile, were not), but not everything could make the cut. Thus, here is my totally-up-for-debate list of the 15 Most Impressive Box Office Performances of 2013 so far. (Shown in order of highest-to-lowest grossing)
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Box office report: 'Oblivion' reaffirms Tom Cruise's star power with $38.2 million debut

oblivion-tom-cruise.jpg

If this weekend’s box office is any indication, the couch jumping stigma that has plagued Tom Cruise’s career for the better part of the last decade may finally be thing of the past.

Cruise’s latest, the $120 million sci-fi adventure Oblivion, opened to a solid $38.2 million this weekend. That’s a terrific start for the chiseled star, who has struggled recently at the box office with under-performers like Jack Reacher, Rock of Ages, Valkyrie, and Knight and Day. In fact, only four Cruise vehicles have ever opened higher — and three of them are Mission Impossible movies. (The other is War of the Worlds). Oblivion actually marks the first number one opening for Cruise in seven years, though it should be noted that Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol opened in limited release and climbed to number one upon its wide expansion.

Cruise isn’t the only star in Oblivion — it also features Morgan Freeman, Andrea Riseborough, and Olga Kurlyenko — but it was marketed almost exclusively on his appeal. According to distributor Universal, audiences, which were 57 percent male and 74 percent 25 or older, listed Tom Cruise as their primary reason for seeing the film, followed by the sci-fi genre and Morgan Freeman. Those same audiences weren’t in love with what they saw, though, as Oblivion was issued a lackluster “B-” CinemaScore grade.

Domestically, Oblivion opened in 3,783 theaters and earned a fantastic $10,085 location average. IMAX screens accounted for $5.5 million of Oblivion‘s weekend gross. Internationally, the film had a successful weekend, as well. After its $61.1 million opening from 52 territories, Oblivion took in another $33.6 million from 60 territories this time around. The film has grossed $112 million so far (for a $150.2 million worldwide total), and it has high-profile openings in Japan and China still to come.

In second, the Jackie Robinson drama 42 fell only 34 percent to $18 million for a $54.1 million total after ten days. Warner Bros.’ $40 million baseball pic, which earned an “A+” CinemaScore grade, didn’t hold quite as well as The Help, another “A+” racially charged drama, which dipped 23 percent in its second weekend. Thus, while 42 still seems likely to hit the $100 million mark, it doesn’t seem destined for a gross in the same range as The Help‘s $169 million total. Still, 42 is a big winner for Warner Bros., which was in dire need of a box office hit.

The Croods spent the weekend in third place, dropping 28 percent to $9.5 million. After five weeks, the $135 million animation has grossed $154.9 million, a great start in the five-year distribution deal between DreamWorks Animation and Fox.

In fourth, Scary Movie 5 didn’t hold nearly as well. The $20 million spoof from Weinstein’s Dimension fell 56 percent to $6.3 million, giving it a weak $22.9 million total after ten days. At the same point in its run, Scary Movie 4 had earned $67.5 million.

G.I. Joe: Retaliation rounded out the Top 5 with $5.8 million, marking a 48 percent drop from its prior frame. Paramount’s $130 million film has now earned $111.2 million domestically, a substantially lower gross than its predecessor, but it’s been making up ground overseas, where the film has earned $211.7 million. Retaliation opened in China this week, where it took in $33 million during its first seven days. Worldwide, Retaliation has earned $322.9 million and should pass the $400 million mark with ease.

1. Oblivion – $38.2 million
2. 42 – $18 million
3. The Croods – $9.5 million
4. Scary Movie 5 – $6.3 million
5. G.I. Joe: Retaliation – $5.8 million

The Place Beyond the Pines just missed the Top 5 after expanding from 514 theaters into 1,542 theaters. Pines grossed $4.8 million, yielding a mediocre $3,078 per theater average, which doesn’t merit further expansion. The Focus Features release cost $15 million and has earned $11.4 million total.

Two other quick highlights: Sony’s $13 million Halle Berry thriller The Call passed the $50 million mark this weekend. It’s been a nice mid-level hit for distributor TriStar. Olympus Has Fallen has also been doing terrific business for its distributor, FilmDistrict. After five weekends, the White House thriller has quietly earned $88.8 million.

For more box office coverage, follow me on Twitter:

Read more:
Oblivion: EW Review
The Place Beyond the Pines: EW Review
42: EW Review
The Croods: EW Review
G.I. Joe: Retaliation: EW Review

Box office update: 'G.I. Joe' takes a commanding lead on Friday with $15.5 million

Following a solid $10.5 million Thursday, Paramount’s long-delayed sequel G.I. Joe: Retaliation stayed on top of the box office on Friday with $15.5 million.

The action film, which stars The Rock, Channing Tatum, and Bruce Willis, may take in about $38 million over the three-day period — if that seems like a low weekend multiplier, it is, but that’s due to families staying in for Easter and the NCAA tournament — which would give it about $49 million since its Wednesday night debut. For reference, G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra started off with $54 million in its first three days in 2009. Paramount claims that Retaliation cost $130 million, but a recent L.A. Times story suggests the budget actually climbed to $185 million.

Last weekend’s victor, The Croods, slipped to second place with $10.7 million. The $135 million family film may take in about $28 million over the weekend, which would bring its total to $90 million after ten days.

Tyler Perry’s Temptation got off to a great start with $9.4 million on Friday. The $20 million Lionsgate film is headed to a strong $22 million weekend, higher than Perry’s last non-Madea film, Good Deeds, which opened with $15.6 million.

The Host began its run in fourth place with $5.5 million, which should yield a weekend in the $13 million range. Open Road says the film cost about $40 million. Olympus Has Fallen was close behind with $4.8 million, though it may surpass The Host by Sunday night.

1. G.I. Joe: Retaliation – $15.5 million
2. The Croods – $10.7 million
3. Temptation – $9.4 million
4. The Host – $5.5 million
5. Olympus Has Fallen – $4.8 million

Check back tomorrow for the full box office report.

For more box office musing, follow me on Twitter:

Box office preview: 'G.I. Joe' ready to duke it out with 'Temptation' and 'The Host'

It’s Easter weekend, which means that families are together, candy is getting unwrapped, and off-of-work Americans across the country are planning to hop on over to the movies. Family films tend to thrive on Easter weekend, thanks mostly to the Sunday holiday and the fact that extended family members visiting one another need something to do — other than argue. This year, Easter falls in the thick of March Madness, which may keep basketball fans on the bench couch, but a trio of high profile new releases will help counteract that distraction, and the box office should earn a respectable sum.

Here’s how the weekend rankings might shake out:

1. G.I. Joe: Retaliation – $35 million ($43 million four-day total)
Many were surprised when Paramount ordered a sequel to the 2009 under-performer G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. The action film, which starred a pre-A-list Channing Tatum, earned $150.2 million domestically ($302 million worldwide) against a $175 million budget. Certainly no great shakes. But Paramount, MGM, and Skydance Productions pressed on with a follow-up, shifting Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson into the lead role (Tatum was reportedly killed off in the original version of the film, which was mysteriously pushed back from summer 2012 to 2013 following Tatum’s breakout spring in The Vow and 21 Jump Street so paramount could “add 3D”) and tightening up the budget to $130 million. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'The Croods' scores rock solid $44.7M, 'Olympus Has Fallen' strong in second

This weekend, The Croods proved that cave people have more pop culture appeal than just Geico commercials.

The $135 million film, which features vocal performances by Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, and Ryan Reynolds, bashed up a strong $44.7 million in its first three days — the second best debut of 2013 behind Oz‘s $79.1 million bow. The colorful family film was produced by DreamWorks Animation, whose last film, Rise of the Guardians, severely underperformed and forced the company to take an $87 million write-down. Thus, The Croods‘ success (for reference, Rise opened with just $23.7 million on its way to a $103.2 million domestic finish) is vindicating for the Jeffrey-Katzenberg-owned studio.

For distributor Fox, who inked a five-year distribution deal with DreamWorks Animation last year, The Croods is poised to become a massive success. The film opened in the same range as 2012′s Ice Age: Continental Drift ($46.7 million) and higher than the studio’s 2011 release, Rio, which began its flight with $39.2 million.

With an “A” CinemaScore and Easter/Spring Break ahead for many young school-goers — plus the fact that there are literally no family or animated films hitting theaters until Epic on May 24 — The Croods could evolve into a box office mammoth. A $200 million domestic finish wouldn’t surprise me one bit. Internationally, The Croods proved equally appealing, bowing with $63.3 million for a sizzling $108 million global total after its first three days. READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Croods' cruises to No. 1 on Friday with $11.6 million; 'Admission' rejected

Fox’s $135 million family film The Croods climbed out of its cave and straight to No. 1 at the box office on Friday, taking in $11.6 million in its first 24 hours. The colorful comedy, which was produced by DreamWorks Animation (whose last film, Rise of the Guardians, forced the company to take an $87 million write-down), will benefit from strong Saturday showings and Sunday matinees with parents and children, and it should finish the weekend with a rock-solid $42 million.

In second, FilmDistrict’s White House thriller Olympus Has Fallen broke out with a strong $10 million and is headed for a $28 million weekend — a better start than February’s A Good Day to Die Hard, which took in $24.8 million in its first weekend. The action film, which stars Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, and Morgan Freeman, cost Millennium Films $70 million to produce. READ FULL STORY

Box office preview: 'The Croods' will oust 'Oz' from top spot

Oz has reigned atop the box office for two weeks, but Fox’s family flick The Croods is ready to club the Disney tentpole out of the pole position this weekend.

Two other new releases, the White House thriller Olympus Has Fallen and the Tina Fey/Paul Rudd comedy Admission, should also make notable debuts, as will Harmony Korine’s “Disney Channel starlets gone bad” film Spring Breakers, which is expanding from three theaters to over 1,000 locations.

Here’s how the box office may shake out:

1. The Croods – $40 million
The caveman comedy will be the first film distributed under the new five-year DreamWorks Animation/Fox deal. From 2006 to 2012, DreamWorks Animation had its films distributed by Paramount. Both companies took a big hit last year with Rise of the Guardians, which forced DreamWorks Animation to take an $87 million writedown. The Croods should fare much better. It’s more colorful, more comedic, and facing less competition for families than Rise was in November. Fox has marketed the film, which cost about $135 million, aggressively, and the distributor has a proven formula for success — they launched Rio to $39.2 million in spring 2011. Out in a massive 4,046 theaters, The Croods could earn $40 million over its first three days.

2. Oz The Great and Powerful – $22 million
The $215 million production, which has already earned $153 million domestically, would fall more sharply against The Croods if it played exclusively to families. Thankfully, Oz is hitting with more than just parents and kids. As it stands, the film may drop by nearly 50 percent to $22 million, giving it a $178 million total.

3. Olympus Has Fallen – $21 million
FilmDistrict will distribute Millennium Entertainment’s $70 million White House thriller, which stars Gerard Butler, Morgan Freeman, and Aaron Eckhart in 3,098 theaters. Olympus is entering a market that has been especially unkind to male-driven action in recent months, but its buzz seems to have built nonetheless. Seeing the White House in danger is a popular novelty — a second White House action movie, White House Down, will hit theaters this summer — and Olympus‘ strong advertising images will bring in men over the age of 18, with whom the R-rated film has been tracking well. Plus, Morgan Freeman!  All told, expect about $21 million over the weekend.

4. Admission – $9 million
Everyone likes Tina Fey. And everyone likes Paul Rudd. But people like them because they make them laugh — something that ads for Admission, Focus Features’ $13 million college admission comedy, have failed to do. Fey’s fans like her because she’s sharp, not sweet, so they may skip this one. And the weak performances of How Do You Know, Wanderlust, and Our Idiot Brother suggest that Rudd is a bigger draw in male-targeting comedies than female-friendly relationship tales. Focus is releasing Admission in 2,160 theaters, where it may only make about $9 million.

5. The Call – $8.5 million
The Halle Berry thriller dialed up a successful debut weekend, but with mediocre buzz and loads of new competition, there’s no reason it should hold especially well. The Call may dip 50 percent to $8.5 million, which would give it nearly $31 million total. Not half bad considering the TriStar-released film cost only $15 million to produce.

Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers has a shot at breaking into the Top 5, if it isn’t too weird for mainstream America. The film earned $263,000 from three theaters last weekend, encouraging distributor A24 to push it into 1,104 locations this time around. Spring Breakers has garnered massive publicity from the casting of Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens, two Disney starlets eager to shed their good-girl images. Still, that doesn’t always translate into box office numbers, and Breakers is an off-center film that may struggle to connect with audiences. Curiosity may help pull in about $6 million for the weekend.

Check back to EW all weekend to see how all these films end up doing!

For more box office coverage, follow me on Twitter:

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