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Tag: Oscars (1-10 of 521)

EW's PrizeFighter analyzes the Best Actress race, brought to you by Reese Witherspoon

Thank goodness for Reese ­Witherspoon.

Despite a recent surge in strong roles for women (e.g., Cate Blanchett in Blue Jasmine, Jennifer ­Lawrence in Silver Linings Playbook), Hollywood really dropped the ball when it came to showcasing interesting roles for actresses in 2014. If it weren’t for Witherspoon’s newfound strength as a producer, two of this year’s likely ­nominees wouldn’t exist—and the Best Actress race would look even more dire than it currently does.

Witherspoon herself is one of the primary contenders, of course, for her portrayal of a novice hiker looking for redemption in the adaptation of Cheryl Strayed’s memoir Wild (which the actress produced). But she also optioned and developed the box office hit Gone Girl, which should land a nomination for Rosamund Pike, playing the iciest (and scariest) wife in modern ­cinema. Neither of them is the front­runner, however. READ FULL STORY

Greg Berlanti will be the Oscars' head writer

Oscar produces Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced the upcoming show’s creative team today, and it should make some Arrow fans very happy.  READ FULL STORY

Let the Oscar race begin! EW's PrizeFighter analyzes the Best Actor race

It’s only natural to begin our four-month Oscar discussion with what’s sure to be the most contentious race of all: the Best Actor category. Though it’s only November, this is already one crowded arena, filled with performances that span continents, explore disease, and wrestle with failure. And unfortunately, the race can’t hold them all. READ FULL STORY

Love is blind in 'The Way He Looks,' Brazil's entry for Best Foreign Language Film

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Brazil is the home to more Roman Catholics than any nation on Earth, and though Rome has recently sent signals that it might be softening its stance on homosexuality, the South American country is still relatively conservative when it comes to matters of gay rights. So it’s been a pleasant surprise that The Way He Looks, a gay coming-of-age film from first-time filmmaker Daniel Ribeiro, became a modest indie hit at the box office and was named Brazil’s Oscar entry for Best Foreign Language Film.

“It’s an independent film about an issue people are talking about back in Brazil,” Ribeiro says. “We have problems with the violence against gay people, too, so it’s a film that is talking about an important issue, and I guess people were excited about this film portraying a gay character in a very natural way.” READ FULL STORY

See the Oscar contenders for Best Short Documentary

While the Oscar races for prizes like Best Picture will remain a mystery for the next few months, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has narrowed the field for another Oscar category: Best Documentary Short Subject.

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The Oscar race takes shape: Sure things, contenders, and wild cards

It’s September, so why wouldn’t we start predicting an Oscar race that won’t finish for another five months?

To be fair, Venice, Telluride, and the Toronto film festivals have all concluded. Many films have screened. Many films have connected with audiences, and a rough draft of the Oscar race is beginning to come into focus. Sure, no Academy member will even begin popping in those screener DVDs for another couple of months, but it’s still worth discussing what has buzz and what is likely to still be on voters’ minds once the weather finally begins to cool off.

Here’s a very early look at what the race looks like now. READ FULL STORY

Richard Attenborough and Steven Spielberg: When 'E.T.' met 'Gandhi,' we got dinosaurs

To those who know their whole history, it may seem surprising that there was never any bad blood between Steven Spielberg and the late Richard Attenborough — unless you want to count the prehistoric kind drawn from those amber-encased mosquitos in Jurassic Park, the one big project they made together.

The two filmmakers, separated in age by more than a generation, were rivals who became collaborators and eventually friends. When Attenborough died at age 90 on Sunday, he left behind a legacy as an actor, director, and philanthropist – but the story of his relationship with Spielberg is evidence of another defining trait: gentleman.

Their complicated camaraderie began after the pair crossed paths at the most critical point in each of their careers — 1982, when Attenborough finally completed his 20-year quest to make the biographical drama Gandhi, and Spielberg finished a deeply personal film that stands as one of the best movies ever made about families: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.

Those two films couldn’t have been more different, but were destined for eternal comparison after becoming competitors at the 55th Academy Awards.

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British actor-director Richard Attenborough dies at 90

English actor-director Richard Attenborough died Sunday, his son Michael told the BBC. He was 90.

The Cambridge, England, native made his film debut at 19 in the 1942 war film In Which We Serve, which was later nominated for Best Picture at the 1943 Academy Awards. READ FULL STORY

Turkey nominates Cannes prize-winner as its Oscar hopeful

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The top prize-winner at this spring’s Cannes Film Festival will represent Turkey in the foreign-language Academy Award race. Director Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Winter Sleep, a provocative drama about a former actor who has alienated just about everyone—including his wife (Melisa Sözen, above)—in the mountain community where he now runs a hotel, won the prestigious Palme d’Or at Cannes in May. Ömer Cerik, Turkey’s Minister of Culture and Tourism, tweeted, “I hope Ceylan will show the same success during his Oscar journey as he has many times in the international arena.”

No Turkish film has ever been nominated for a foreign-language Oscar. Winter Sleep will be released in the U.S. later this year by Adopt Films. READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Apes' conquers, 'Boyhood' starts strong

If this weekend’s number one movie Dawn of the Planet of the Apes — the second entry in the rebooted Apes franchise — has a spiritual sibling in the original series of films, it is 1972′s Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. While Conquest was the fourth movie in the franchise to arrive in cinemas it is, like Dawn, the second according to the interior timeline of its series and, again like director Matt Reeves’ new film, features an apocalyptic showdown between apes and humans. Thus, it seems appropriate that this weekend Dawn of the Planet of the Apes comprehensively conquered the domestic box office by earning an estimated $73 million, exceeding both expectations and the $54.8 million opening weekend of its predecessor, 2011′s Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

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