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Tag: Philip Seymour Hoffman (1-10 of 36)

Philip Seymour Hoffman returns in aching animated short

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We’ve all been there. Someone passes away, and later you find an audio tape with their voice on it, or spot them in the background of a home video. For a moment, they’re with you again.

Fans of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman will always have his movies — but now a two-year old interview with the actor, who died in February at age 46, has gotten new life as an animated short.
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Your summer blockbuster survival guide: 10 must-see art-house movies with no aliens, robots, or superheroes

It’s Memorial Day weekend — the unofficial start of summer — and the holiday’s top movies at the box-office will likely be X-Men, Godzilla, and Adam Sandler’s Blended, with Spider-Man 2 still swinging through multiplexes. Ever since Jaws sunk its teeth into the sweltering months of 1975, summer has been blockbuster season, and studios now jockey years in advance to lock up the best dates between Memorial Day and Labor Day for their big-budget blockbusters. A few of them turn out to be quite good, but just about all of them tend to be very, very loud.

Perhaps your eyes won’t glaze over this weekend, what with the summer still young; but a month from now, when Michael Bay’s Transformers: Age of Extinction stomps into 4,000 or so theaters, you might be numb from the relentless roar of CG action that will have pummeled you each and every weekend.

Fortunately, there is hope. Just as there was hope last summer, when Blue Jasmine, Fruitvale Station, Before Midnight, and The Spectacular Now all mercifully poked through the din to save discriminating viewers from perfunctory viewings of After Earth and The Lone Ranger. The summer before, there was Moonrise Kingdom and Beasts of the Southern Wild. See, summers at the movies don’t have to feel like a barrage of Fourth of July fireworks that go on… and on… and on… to diminishing effect.

Below are 10 promising summer movies that lack aliens, animation, robots, and superheroes. Some have come up through the festivals, while others are sitting there undiscovered like seashells on the sand, just waiting for you to pick them up. Hold them up to your ear, and see if they sound better than Godzilla’s roar. READ FULL STORY

Philip Seymour Hoffman haunts 'A Most Wanted Man' poster -- EXCLUSIVE

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It’s been three months since Philip Seymour Hoffman died of a drug overdose, and though Hunger Games fans can still look forward to his scenes as Plutarch Heavensbee in the next two Mockingjay movies, the Oscar winner’s final leading-man role is in A Most Wanted Man, which opens in theaters on July 25.

Hoffman plays Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence agent in Hamberg torn between locking up an Islamic immigrant suspected of terrorist ties (Grigoriy Dobrygin) and manipulating him to entrap an even bigger potential threat. All the while, he has to deal with department rivals, a U.S. intelligence official (Robin Wright) pushing for information, and an immigration attorney (Rachel McAdams) who might be too close to the handsome “most wanted man.” READ FULL STORY

'Mockingjay Part 1': First look at Julianne Moore as President Coin -- VIDEO

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Today Lionsgate unveiled the first images of Julianne Moore as District 13′s President Coin for the upcoming Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1. For fans of the series, she looks just as you’d want her to as president of the resistance: severe gray-streaked hair, a solemn expression, yet eyes that reveal a well of emotions and experiences.

She is a character that is being largely invented by the filmmakers. Coin is a key figure in Mockingjay, but one that is predominantly seen through the distrustful eyes of protagonist Katniss Everdeen. Moore talks about the evolution of her character in a video that appears with the first images.

Moore and director Francis Lawrence spent a lot of time discussing who this woman is and what kind of leader she has become. In particular, Moore references a scene in the story when District 13 is bombed by the Capitol and Coin declines to retaliate. READ FULL STORY

'God's Pocket' trailer: Philip Seymour Hoffman drops a body out of a meat truck

The first trailer has been released for dark comedy God’s Pocket, about a murder in a blue-collar neighborhood in Philadelphia, which stars the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, John Turturro, Christina Hendricks, and Richard Jenkins. God’s Pocket was screened at the Sundance Film Festival this year, marking one of Hoffman’s last appearances before his passing.

John Slattery (Mad Men’s Roger Sterling) takes his first stab at directing and writing a feature film – he adapted the script from Peter Dexter’s novel of the same name. Dexter also wrote The Paperboy, which was made into a movie starring Matthew McConaughey, Nicole Kidman and Zac Efron. (Yes, the one where Nicole peed on Zac.) You won’t see anything as emotionally scarring as some of the scenes in The Paperboy, but you do get to watch Hoffman drop his stepson’s dead body out of a refrigerated meat truck. Watch the trailer below:

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'A Most Wanted Man' trailer: Philip Seymour Hoffman hunts a terrorist

In the wake of his untimely death, every yet-unseen Philip Seymour Hoffman performance is going to be a bittersweet gift. Based on early reviews, A Most Wanted Man lives up to everything we’d come to expect from the formidable talent.

Director Anton Corbijn’s slow-burning, atmospheric spy thriller tells the story of Gunter Bachmann (Hoffman), a German intelligence operative tracking terrorist activities in Hamburg. Based on John le Carré’s intricate 2008 novel, the investigation finds him entangled with a human rights attorney (Rachel McAdams), a banker (Willem Dafoe), and a powerful CIA agent (Robin Wright).

The film premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and is set to hit theaters on July 25. Check out the trailer after the jump.

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John Slattery on 'Mad Men,' Philip Seymour Hoffman, and 'God's Pocket' -- EXCLUSIVE POSTER

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John Slattery thought the Mad Men pilot was brilliant, but it wasn’t until the show was well into its first season that he began to realize that he might be part of something truly great. “You shoot the thing very quickly, so it’s about a week-and-half and then you’re onto another story and then another,” says the actor. “I think it was Elisabeth Moss that I asked, ‘Is it me or do these scripts keep getting better?’ Week to week, with a rushed schedule, this thing just kept getting better and better and better — and year after year, I think it got better. I’ve never seen any show do that.”

Like Roger Sterling, Slattery has evolved during his six-plus seasons on Mad Men. He’s directed five episodes, including the Bobby Kennedy assassination episode “Man With a Plan.” The experience gave him the confidence to direct his first feature, God’s Pocket, based on the Pete Dexter novel about a Philadelphia man caught between a rock and hard place when he has to dispose of his crazy stepson’s body after a construction-site “accident” — without his wife knowing the truth. “Mickey I found a very endearing character,” says Slattery. “A guy who doesn’t feel sorry for himself, who doesn’t have the easiest row to hoe. And just tries to do the right thing for his wife, and can’t seem to get it to go his way.” READ FULL STORY

The night Philip Seymour Hoffman changed my life ...

Philip Seymour Hoffman was not an easy interview. He could be brusque or uninterested. He was not the kind of star who tries to bond with journalists. But a few years ago I caught a glimpse of who Hoffman was not as an actor but as a man, and a bit of advice he gave me changed my life.

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Philip Seymour Hoffman as Lester Bangs: 'Almost Famous' star Patrick Fugit remembers

When Patrick Fugit woke up Sunday morning and learned via Facebook that Philip Seymour Hoffman had died in New York, he had a surprising first thought. It wasn’t a flashback to Almost Famous, Cameron Crowe’s autobiographical coming-of-age movie that starred Fugit as a teenage rock journalist and Hoffman as iconic critic Lester Bangs. “I started immediately thinking about Punch-Drunk Love, which is one of my favorite films that he’s in,” says Fugit, who’s currently filming Gone Girl for David Fincher. “Have you seen the Mattress Man commercial that he’s in? It’s just a deleted scene from the Punch-Drunk Love special edition where he basically jumps onto these mattresses from atop a semi truck and he misses them and falls on the ground. It looks like Philip really wrecks himself. It totally looks real, and it’s genius and hilarious. I don’t know why, but that was the first thing I thought of.”

But after that initial memory, Fugit couldn’t help but reflect on the scenes he shared with Hoffman in Almost Famous. The young actor was only 16 years old at the time and had no clue who Hoffman was when the esteemed actor arrived on the set for three days of filming. Below, as told to EW, Fugit looks back on those pivotal scenes and how they made a lasting impact on him as an actor.
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Cameron Crowe remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman

After the sudden death of Philip Seymour Hoffman yesterday, tributes have been pouring in. Joining those voices today is director Cameron Crowe, who wrote a blog post with his memories of working with Hoffman on the set of Almost Famous, where of course Hoffman portrayed rock journalist Lester Bangs.

Alongside the above photo, Crowe wrote, “My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs.  A call to arms.  In Phil’s hands it became something different.  A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late.  It became the soul of the movie.  In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one.  He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself.  (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.)  When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick.  He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met.  Suddenly the portrait was complete.  The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius.”

Watch one of Hoffman’s memorable scene from Almost Famous below: READ FULL STORY

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