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Tag: Reality TV (1-4 of 4)

'This Is the End' is more than just hilarious. It marks the potentially revolutionary moment when the movies met reality TV

For years, Hollywood producers have been cannibalizing television shows to come up with concepts for movies. The trend might have looked like it was on its way out after the low-rent megaplex versions of Starsky & Hutch and The Dukes of Hazzard (the latter of which I actually liked), but no, it’s still very much with us, from The A-Team to Dark Shadows to 21 Jump Street (can Doctor Who be far behind?). Reality TV, on the other hand, is a different animal, resistant by nature to being translated to the big screen. It’s not that you can’t do it. As far back as the late ’60s, when Candid Camera was a seminal early example of reality programming, that show spawned a smuttier-than-the-small-screen movie version, the boob-tube-plus-boobs What Do You Say to a Naked Lady? (1970). And given that a great many reality shows exploit our attraction to salacious subject matter, it would have seemed far from totally absurd if they’d come up with, say, a movie version of Jersey Shore, where the hot-tub cavorting didn’t need to be fuzzed out and The Situation could have gotten into some situations too risqué for TV. READ FULL STORY

Cannes: Matteo Garrone's 'Reality' skewers reality TV through a contempo Fellini lens

The blowhard standing in the Annie Hall movie line was right, of course: After a while, Federico Fellini really did get to be an “indulgent” filmmaker. But before that dreaded word Felliniesque was turned into a lazy pop- cultural signifier for clowns, dwarves, big-bosomed earth- mother Italian sirens, and a general wearying frenzy of circuslike surrealism, it was a term — and a film aesthetic — that meant something, that conjured the modern madness of everyday life. Reality, the first film directed by Matteo Garrone since Gomorra (2008) — his coldly visionary dissection of an Italian society run at every level by the Mafia — is the rare movie that has some of that old, classic Fellini insanity in its overheated blood. It’s about a man named Luciano (played by Aniello Arena, pictured above, who’s like a jumpy, head-in-the-clouds Frank Stallone), a fish seller in Naples who is pushed into auditioning for the Italian version of the perennial (if not eternal) reality-TV show Big Brother. READ FULL STORY

Jon Hamm lands first leading-man role in 'Million Dollar Arm'

EW has confirmed that Jon Hamm will headline Disney’s Million Dollar Arm, as first reported by Deadline. The Mad Men star will play sports agent-turned-reality show creator J.B. Bernstein, whose reality show Million Dollar Arm documented his search to find promising baseball players in India’s thriving cricket community. The show resulted in the signing of the MLB’s first two Indian players, though neither has yet advanced far in the Pittsburgh Pirates’ minor-league system. Oscar nominee Thomas McCarthy (Win Win) scripted the film. No further production details have been disclosed.

Read more:
Jon Hamm assures teenage girls that it’s okay to fart — VIDEO
Jon Hamm is a ’70s sitcom fan, impromptu word artist — VIDEO
EW Special Coverage: Mad Men

'The Artist' wins big at the Directors Guild Awards

The Directors Guild of America announced its annual awards tonight at a ceremony in the Grand Ballroom above the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Artist‘s Michel Hazanavicius took home the prize for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Feature Film. Fellow nominees Martin Scorsese (Hugo) and Alexander Payne (The Descendants) also spoke at the event while accepting their nomination medallions. As is his custom for awards events, nominee Woody Allen (Midnight in Paris) was not present; nominee David Fincher (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo) had to fly to the premiere of his film in Tokyo, Japan, although he did attend the nominee breakfast Saturday morning.

Hosted by Kelsey Grammer, the evening also feted directors for feature documentaries, and TV dramas, comedies, reality shows, made-for-TV movies and miniseries, soap operas, children’s programming, and commercials.

Since 1948, the DGA Award winner for feature film has gone on to win the Academy Award for Best Director every year save for six exceptions, most recently when Rob Marshall took home the DGA Award for Chicago in 2002, while Roman Polanski won the Oscar for The Pianist.

Check out the full list of winners below: READ FULL STORY

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