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Tag: Roland Emmerich (1-10 of 12)

'White House Down' extended trailer: 'Can you not hit me in the head with a rocket?' -- VIDEO

Remember when we all thought White House Down was just about monuments blowing up? As the new, four-minute trailer makes clear, Roland Emmerich’s new film is also about Channing Tatum, as wannabe Secret Service agent John Cale, saving his daughter; and it is also about Channing Tatum working with the president (Jamie Foxx, in glasses and sneakers) to save America. It is also funny, kind of. I think Maggie Gyllenhaal plays C.J. Cregg.

Watch the trailer below:
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'White House Down' stars bust a move -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Playing father and daughter in White House Down has clearly led to an off-screen bond between Channing Tatum and Joey King. The adorable duo even had time to come up with a seriously elaborate secret handshake.

Sony gave EW a front-row seat to the choreographed routine, which includes fake punches, a baseball pitch and even sound effects. Everybody knows that Tatum has moves, but King gives him a run for his money in the swagger department. Check out the cute on-set moment here:
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New 'White House Down' trailer shows the film's -- and star Channing Tatum's -- funny side

Roland Emmerich can always be counted upon to deliver disaster spectacle, and it’s looking like that’s going to hold true in his next movie, White House Down. The latest trailer for the upcoming movie has no shortage of Stuff Blowing Up, including iconic buildings like the U.S. Capitol.

White House Down stars Channing Tatum as a man applying for a job as a Secret Service Agent. After he’s denied that job, he takes his daughter to the White House for a tour on the same day it comes under attack, and he gets the chance to prove himself when he ends up protecting the President (Jamie Foxx).

This newest trailer depicts White House Down as more of a rollicking action movie than the tense thriller seen in the first trailer. Check out Tatum flexing both his comedy and action muscles (and his real muscles!) below: READ FULL STORY

Peter Jackson and others weigh in on Hollywood's F/X crisis

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Visual effects artists routinely work miracles onscreen, helping Hollywood generate billions of dollars every year at the box office. Still, the VFX industry is now in a state of crisis. In the past seven months, two leading F/X houses, Digital Domain and Rhythm & Hues, have gone into bankruptcy, and several other companies have had to lay off workers. “Right now it’s near rock bottom,” says Peter Oberdorfer, a former VFX artist who now runs a digital-technology consulting firm. “The pressure is building to a point where it could get volatile for everybody involved.”

In this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly, The Hobbit director Peter Jackson, a digital effects pioneer who co-founded the F/X company Weta Digital, says studios are taking advantage of an oversupply of F/X houses to drive down prices. “Competition between VFX houses, which the studios obviously use to their advantage, has resulted in VFX houses operating on tiny profit margins,” Jackson says. “And when we talk ‘profit,’ it’s not about the owners buying a Porsche at the end of a big movie — it’s about having a nest egg to ride out the slow periods.” READ FULL STORY

Roland Emmerich: Will Smith is 'too big' for 'Independence Day' sequels

Back in 1996, Will Smith launched onto the A-list after playing alien-slugging pilot Steven Hiller in Independence Day — and he’s stayed there ever since, reigning for nearly 20 years as one of Hollywood’s most respected and bankable stars. So now that two new Independence Day movies are in the works, fans are asking the obvious question: Is Smith coming back for the sequels?

According to director Roland Emmerich, who sat down with EW yesterday to talk about his presidential thriller White House Down (out June 28), the answer is no. READ FULL STORY

'White House Down' trailer: Channing Tatum will save us all

No one kills a peaceful, normal day like Roland Emmerich.

In Emmerich’s White House Down (the other White House under attack movie of the season) John Cale (Channing Tatum) just wants the opportunity to protect the President (Jamie Foxx). After he’s denied that job, he takes his daughter to the White House for a tour on the same day it comes under attack, and he gets the chance to prove himself. Good thing he wore his John McClane outfit.

From screenwriter James Vanderbilt (Zodiac) it’s a somewhat irresistible formula, combining the contained chaos of Die Hard and raising the stakes by putting the leader of the country in danger. We’re especially excited to see Zero Dark Thirty star Jason Clarke lead the group of mercenaries trying to overtake the White House. Maggie Gyllenhaal and James Woods also co-star as Secret Service Agents.

Check out the first trailer for the summer blockbuster below and let us know what you think.

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Roland Emmerich spills 'Independence Day' sequel details

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It’s been almost almost 17 years since aliens destroyed the White House and the Empire State Building in Roland Emmerich’s 1996 blockbuster Independence Day. But the world’s monuments aren’t safe yet. Emmerich, whose action-packed White House Down hits theaters June 28, says he plans to wreak a new round of havoc in two sequels – ID Forever Part 1 and ID Forever Part II. The films take place 20 years after the original, when a distress call sent by the first wave of aliens finally brings reinforcements to Earth. “The humans knew that one day the aliens would come back,” explains the director, who completed two scripts with Independence Day co-writer Dean Devlin and has given them to White House Down writer-producer James Vanderbilt for a rewrite. “And they know that the only way you can really travel in space is through wormholes. So for the aliens, it could take two or three weeks, but for us that’s 20 or 25 years.” READ FULL STORY

What's going on with the troubled VFX industry?

Image credit: Marvel, New Line Cinema, Lionsgate

Image credit: Marvel, New Line Cinema, Lionsgate

The buzz around the state of the visual effects industry reached a fever pitch this winter when prominent effects house Rhythm & Hues filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in mid-February. Further attention was pointed at the men and women who create whole worlds from a blank green canvas during the Oscars, when VFX artists held a protest near the ceremony, which honored Life of Pi – a movie with effects by Rhythm & Hues – with an Academy Award in the visual effects category. The complaint? Movies like The Avengers, The Hunger Games, and The Lord of the Rings trilogy have scored big at the box office, grossing millions, sometimes billions worldwide, but the VFX industry that brought Asgard, Panem and Middle-earth to life doesn’t reap the same benefits as the studios.

The movement has spurred supporters to change their Facebook and Twitter profile photos to a green box, representing the green screen that would appear in movies were it not for VFX. Blogs have popped up that feature photos of what movie shots looked like before visual effects turned Andy Serkis into Gollum, before Mark Ruffalo was turned into the Hulk.

And more and more visual effects artists and their colleagues are speaking out about their financial woes and the changes to the business that they want to see. Last Thursday visual effects artists gathered for a meeting dubbed Pi Day VFX Town Hall (the name dually referencing Life of Pi and the March 14 holiday, as well as the artists’ frequent call for their “piece of the pi”). Panelists spoke to and took questions from a group of industry members at the Gnomon School of Visual Effects in Los Angeles, and VFX artists from around the world (including Vancouver, B.C., London, San Francisco, Austin, Tex. and New Zealand) connected via Google+ Hangout for the international discussion.

To help sort out the issues at hand in all this, EW talked to several Hollywood visual effects artists as well as with Roland Emmerich, director of visual effects-driven disaster movies Independence Day, GodzillaThe Day After Tomorrow, and 2012, as well as the upcoming White House Down. We also reached out to several other directors of effects-driven films and representatives for major Hollywood studios and for the Directors Guild of America. None returned EW’s request for comment for this article.

Just how bad are the financial woes of the visual effects industry?

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Pre-production on Roland Emmerich's sci-fi 'Singularity' on hold for further script development

Pre-production on Roland Emmerich’s near-future sci-fi blockbuster Singularity has been put on hold to give the Day After Tomorrow/Independence Day writer-director more time to revise the script with his 2012 cowriter Harald Kloser and Ray Kurzweil, a rep for Sony Pictures confirms with EW. Kurzweil is the man who coined the titular artificial intelligence term, who’ll now join the team for revisions. (The news was first reported by Variety.)

The film is expected to stay on target for a May 2013 release. Per the trade, the film centers on a nanotechnology expert who uses a new procedure to save his son, Adam, whose consciousness is transferred into nanobots that take his physical form.

'Anonymous' trailer: William Shakespeare, meet Roland Emmerich

Playing the What if? game with major historical figures is always fun. What if Abraham Lincoln hunted vampires? What if Hitler was killed in a French movie house? What if William Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet while in the throes of an impossible romance with a woman betrothed to another man? Or what if Shakespeare never wrote anything at all?

That last what if is the premise of Anonymous (out Sept. 30), the historical thriller directed by Roland Emmerich that operates under the long-discussed theory that another man, Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford (Rhys Ifans), wrote the great works credited to William Shakespeare. While Emmerich’s past relationship with historical fiction has leaned much closer to fiction than history (10,000 B.C., The Patriot, heck, even Stargate), at the very least he’s landed a cast boasting all kinds of theatrical bone fides: Rhys Ifans as De Vere, David Thewlis as William Cecil, and Joely Richardson and her mother Vanessa Redgrave as the younger and older Queen Elizabeth I. Heck, even Shakespearean luminary Derek Jacobi makes an appearance in a present day prologue. Check out the full trailer below: READ FULL STORY

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