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Tag: Silver Linings Playbook (1-10 of 38)

Robert De Niro says he's re-teaming with David O. Russell, Jennifer Lawrence for 'Joy'

Confirming earlier rumors, Robert De Niro has now said he will be taking part in David O. Russell’s upcoming film Joy.

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David O. Russell to be honored at Los Angeles Film Festival

The rave reviews and positive audience reception of Silver Linings Playbook have earned director David O. Russell some special honors at this year’s Los Angeles Film Festival. He will be the festival’s Guest Director and will also receive the event’s Spirit of Independence Award.

In Russell’s role as Guest Director, he will host a screening of his 1999 film Three Kings, starring George Clooney. He will also attend the 12th annual Filmmaker Retreat at George Lucas’s Skywalker Ranch in northern California, a gathering for filmmakers who have movies in the L.A. festival. READ FULL STORY

'Django,' 'Ted,' 'Silver Linings' lead 2013 MTV Movie Award nominations

Awards season: it’s not actually over!

Two Best Picture runners-up and a raunchy comedy about a talking toy lead the MTV Movie Award nominations, which were announced live on the network tonight. Both Django Unchained and Ted scored big with seven nominations apiece; Silver Linings Playbook also did well, garnering six total nominations. Unsurprisingly, almost all of them had something to do with newly-crowned Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence — the outspoken starlet scored five nods altogether, including one for her performance in the horror film House at the End of the Street.

The awards will be handed out live on April 14 during a ceremony hosted by Rebel Wilson, a double nominee herself for Pitch Perfect. Check out the full list of nominees below — and don’t forget to vote for your favorites at MovieAwards.MTV.com.

Movie of the Year
Django Unchained
Silver Linings Playbook
Ted
The Avengers
The Dark Knight Rises

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'Silver Linings Playbook' wins big at Independent Spirit Awards

The weekend’s other big movie awards ceremony—the Independent Spirit Awards—was held this afternoon in Santa Monica, Calif., with Andy Samberg on board as host. The big winner was David O. Russell’s romantic dramedy Silver Linings Playbook, which took home four prizes: best feature, best director, best actress, and best screenplay. But there was plenty of love spread around the year’s top indies. Here’s the full list of winners: READ FULL STORY

Oscar-nominated editors clear up the biggest misconception about their category (and explain the decisions you may not know they're making)

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Leading up to Sunday’s Oscars, EW.com will take a closer look at four categories that moviegoers may mistakenly think of as “technical.” First up: Film Editing, with insights from Life of Pi‘s Tim Squyres, Silver Linings Playbook‘s Jay Cassidy and Crispin Struthers, and Zero Dark Thirty‘s Dylan Tichenor and William Goldenberg, the latter of whom also cut Argo, making him one of only a handful of editors in Oscar history to compete with himself. Lincoln‘s Michael Kahn completes the category. (Update: Read our Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, and Cinematography pieces.)

Ask a film editor what the biggest misconception is about his or her role, and the answer is the same: “It sounds funny, but a lot of people tend to think it’s a purely technical job where you literally go in and cut slates off, and the director says, ‘Do that, do that, do that,'” says William Goldenberg, Oscar-nominated this year for both Argo and Zero Dark Thirty and previously for The Insider and Seabiscuit. What will surprise those moviegoers then is just how many decisions the editor actually makes — and when. Let’s start with an overview: READ FULL STORY

The EW Popularity Index: Which 2012 movies had legs at the box office?

There’s no arguing who won the 2012 box-office: The Avengers smashed the competition, making $623.4 million. The Dark Knight Rises, The Hunger Games, Skyfall, and Breaking Dawn Part 2 also recorded blockbuster grosses, and the executives responsible for these hits can pat themselves on the backs for delivering the goods, which in these cases did not come cheap. The top 10 movies on last year’s box-office list cost, on average, more than $175 million each to produce — and that’s before a dime was spent on the marketing of a film and all the other fine-print considerations that eat into the profits.

But there’s more than one way to judge a film’s success, and while every producer might prefer to be in The Avengers‘ position, other, more modest films can claim victory as well. Back in 2005, EW devised a Popularity Index, which measured a film’s staying power in theaters; we’ve tweaked it only slightly this year to recognize the increasing number of platform releases. To get the index, we simply divided a movie’s total domestic gross by its biggest weekend tally — normally its opening frame, but not always.

The result is 10 movies that didn’t have record-breaking opening weekends, but they had legs. Many of them started slowly and gained steam as awards season heated up. Others were initially seen as disappointments, but then they just refused to go away, playing week after week to decent crowds. Most all of them had that rumored-to-be-extinct Hollywood creature: The Movie Star. Beancounters might prefer to be on that other box-office list, but the Popularity Index captures elements of quality that studios shouldn’t overlook.

Click below for the 2012 Popularity Index Top 10. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2013: See the Academy's special edition posters for the nine Best Picture nominees

The Best Picture nominees have gotten a pop art facelift. Not that the nine Oscar contenders needed a facelift of any kind, but the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences – along with Gallery1988 – still found a way to produce a fresh, eye-popping take on now-iconic images from these films.

The Academy recently released nine posters, one for each nominee, created by an international group of artists, many of whom have worked with Gallery1988 before.

Called “For Your Consideration,” the project is the first collaborative exhibition for Gallery1988 and the Academy. The Los Angeles gallery’s past entertainment-related poster collections include “Fringe Benefits,” which featured art inspired by fan-favorite episodes of Fringe, and The LOST Underground Art Show. READ FULL STORY

BAFTA winners announced, 'Argo' picks up Best Film and Director awards

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts handed out their awards Sunday in London. Argo walked away the big winner with Best Film and Best Director for Ben Affleck.

Lead acting prizes went to Daniel Day-Lewis for Lincoln and Emmanuelle Riva for Amour, with supporting awards going to Christolph Waltz for Django Unchained, and Anne Hathaway for Les Misérables. Click past the jump to take a look at the full list of winners.

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Box office report: 'Identity Thief' wins the weekend, beats expectations and 'Bridesmaids'

Identity Thief (CinemaScore: B) fared even better than expected, bringing in $36.6 million over the weekend across 3,141 theaters. For comparison, Melissa McCarthy’s last major film Bridesmaids (though it was in a supporting role) opened at $26.2 million, in 2,918 theaters. With an opening like this, big things are surely expected from Seth Gordon’s R-rated comedy which has already surpassed its $35 million production budget. Though Bateman and Gordon had a successful run with Horrible Bosses after a $28.3 million opening weekend in July 2011, Bateman hasn’t had this kind of luck with most of his starring roles. Universal’s The Change-Up (with Ryan Reynolds) opened at $13.5 million in August 2011 and went on to gross only $37.1 million domestically, on a $52 million production budget. 

Jonathan Levine’s Warm Bodies took second place for its second weekend with $11.5 million, bringing its domestic total to $36.7 million. This breaks Levine’s record, beating the lifetime domestic gross of his last feature, the cancer dramedy 50/50 with Seth Rogen and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, which brought in $35 million.

The R-rated Hitchcock-style, prescription-drug thriller Side Effects (CinemaScore: B) ended up beating director Steven Soderbergh’s January 2012 weekend opening of Haywire, earning $10 million weekend this weekend and averaging $3,845 per theater. We talked a little bit about stars Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum’s box office history yesterday. Another star of Side Effects is Jude Law, and he’s got a varied track record at the box office. He generally participates in ensemble casts — Anna Karenina, the Sherlock Holmes franchise, Soderbergh’s Contagion, The Holiday — making his singular box office appeal somewhat more elusive. Side Effects has Soderbergh’s name and another strong ensemble, and could go on to a respectable run, even though it won’t reach Contagion heights (the epidemic thriller eventually grossed $76 million).

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Box office update: Soderbergh's 'Side Effects' is no match for 'Identity Thief'

Identity Thief persevered in spite of winter storm Nemo, with an $11.2 million Friday opening. The R-rated Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy vehicle from director Seth Gordon opened wide in 3,141 theaters, and may be on track for a $35 million weekend. Bateman and Gordon scored big with Horrible Bosses, which had a $9.9 million Friday opening in July and went on to gross $117.5 million domestically. This is McCarthy’s first starring role, and could bode well for The Heat, which was pushed back to a June release. McCarthy also recently started a production company with her husband Ben Falcone and already has three projects in the works.

Steven Soderbergh’s Side Effects fared less well, opening Friday in 2,605 theaters at $2.8 million–almost exactly on track with Soderbergh’s Haywire, which opened in late January 2012 with a $2.9 million Friday and a $8.4 million weekend. Channing Tatum’s last three movies, 21 Jump Street (March), The Vow (February), and Magic Mike (June), all had Friday grosses exceeding $10 million. Rooney Mara’s Girl with the Dragon Tattoo opened decently the weekend before Christmas in 2011, but fizzled after that.

The area affected by Nemo represents about 12% of the country’s box office. AMC alone closed 43 theaters in the northeast corridor including in Boston, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. New York theaters will attempt to open Saturday night, but Boston theaters are planning to remain closed through Sunday.

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