Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Star Trek Into Darkness (1-10 of 37)

Best of 2013 (Behind the Scenes): How 'Star Trek' used music to move you (and made you cry)

When Star Trek Into Darkness was released in May, our Sounds Like a Summer Movie series took a look at how music was used for dramatic impact — and it was used a lot. Sound mixer Will Files, who first worked with director J.J. Abrams on Cloverfield, estimates there’s music over 75 to 80 percent of the film. Once again, Abrams used longtime collaborator Michael Giacchino, who won an Oscar for scoring Up. “J.J. and Michael take a pretty classic approach to scoring a film in that it’s more about the emotional beats in a scene and trying to figure out which character’s perspective you are trying to play in that moment, who you are trying to connect the audience with,” Files said. “Because of that, you end up with something that is not quite as generically action movie-oriented. You have a score that’s much more lyrical because it’s playing these broader strokes of emotion rather than the minutia of the actual action that’s happening on the screen.”

Part of Files’ job is to change the relative balance of sound effects to music so there’s an ebb and flow and the film never feels stagnant. But SPOILER ALERT!, above all, Files is there to make sure the final mix serves the story. The first scene we wanted him to break down was Kirk’s death. (You know you cried.)

Click here for more of EW.com’s Best of 2013 coverage.
READ FULL STORY

Analysis: Which summer movie had the highest social HIT score?

Despite a few real busts, this summer largely saw a rather buzzy box office — to the tune of over $4 billion so far. But it might surprise you to see which of the top 20 summer films were the most positively received by audiences.

EW has partnered with General Sentiment to develop an aggregate score to report — not just on what is trending in social media — but on what users are actually saying on social networks across the two weeks following a film’s release.

The most positive buzz on social networks, according to our data, was the discussion around Dreamworks’ animated film Turbo, followed closely by the Channing Tatum/Jamie Foxx action movie White House Down, and buddy cop Sandra Bullock/Melissa McCarthy romp The Heat. Not surprisingly, Johnny Depp’s critically panned Lone Ranger fell near the bottom of the list, but several films that had huge pre-release buzz, including Star Trek Into Darkness and Iron Man 3, saw their social buzz wind up somewhere in the middle after release.

Using a 100-point scale for each film — a score of 50 being neutral, a score of 51 and higher skewing positive, while scores of 49 and lower skew more negative, General Sentiment and EW can catch the sentiment of the social chatter – both positive and negative. Check out the HIT score below.
READ FULL STORY

The key trend in Hollywood this summer? Blockbusters -- surprise! -- are now really good movies

When it comes to Hollywood’s summer blockbusters, most of the press, including critics, is a little bit schizophrenic. From early May until the middle of August, the red carpet gets rolled out, each week, for one or two or three mega-budgeted releases that are aiming to be summer smashes, and though much of the media fanfare is noise and hype and advertising, there’s a lot of sincere enthusiasm mixed in there, too. Why wouldn’t there be? Summer movies, when they’re good, are a special form of entertainment — there’s nothing else like them, really — and reviewers aren’t shy when it comes to giving them a hearty thumbs up. Sure, certain films get more or less universally trashed, whether it’s the Transformers movies of the Hangover sequels or The Lone Ranger. But those tend to be the exceptions. If you read reviews of summer movies from week to week, you’d hardly come away thinking that the critics are snobs. READ FULL STORY

Exclusive: 'Star Trek Into Darkness' hits Blu-ray and DVD on...

This fall, your TV will boldly go where no TV has gone before.

EW can exclusively reveal that J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek Into Darkness will be released on DVD, Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D, and On Demand on September 10, 2013. A digital download of the film will be available three weeks earlier, on August 20.

“I’m thrilled with how everything looks and sounds,” Abrams said in a statement. “We also have some really fun behind-the-scenes special features that we shot on the Red [Epic cameras] and created entirely in-house at Bad Robot. They really look amazing and unlike anything I’ve seen on DVD or Blu-ray before.”

Those special features include making-of shorts about creating the Red Planet and the Klingon home world of Kronos, as well as a sit-down with stars Zachary Quinto and Benedict Cumberbatch — and a segment called “The Enemy of My Enemy,” which explores “how, and why, the identity of the film’s true villain was kept a mystery to the very end.”

Box office report: 'After Earth' crashes, marks Will Smith's worst summer opening in 20 years

After

Ever since Independence Day‘s $50.2 million debut on July 4th weekend in 1996, Will Smith has been the undisputed king of the summer box office. He’s led films like Men In Black; Bad Boys II; I, Robot; and Hancock to massive grosses — both domestically and around the world.

But his latest effort, After Earth, landed with a major thud on opening weekend, grossing just $27 million (distributor Sony told outlets it was expecting $35 million before the weekend) and opening in third place with a tepid “B” CinemaScore. The $130 million M. Night Shyamalan-directed sci-fi film, based on an original story idea by Will Smith himself, also starred the A-lister’s son, Jaden. The father/son duo previously found success with 2006′s The Pursuit of Happyness, which earned $163.6 million, but this time around, the casting gimmick wasn’t enough to get audiences into the door.

After Earth‘s opening weekend was Smith’s lowest summer debut since his first wide release, Made In America, which bowed with $11.8 million in 1993. Discouragingly, After Earth opened with even less than Smith’s oft-ridiculed Wild Wild West, which wrangled $27.8 million in its opening weekend in 1999.

So what went wrong? Well, M. Night Shyamalan’s name certainly repelled many potential viewers. The director has lost credibility with audiences after films like Lady In The Water, The Happening, and The Last Airbender, and Sony wisely kept his name out of all marketing materials. Still, film buffs (and anyone that read the scathing reviews) weren’t fooled. The blame can’t lie solely with the director, though, especially at a time when people seem to feel little affection for the Smith family. Between accusations of Hollywood nepotism, backlash against eyebrow-raising interviews, and lingering suspicions about their involvement with Scientology, Will, Jaden, and the rest of the gang seem to be in a bit of a public opinion rut.

Whatever the reason for After Earth‘s domestic under-performance, Sony is hoping that international grosses can make up lost ground. And that certainly could happen since Will Smith’s film’s often gross more overseas than they do in America. Last year, Men In Black 3 took in $179 million domestically and $445 million internationally, and time will tell whether After Earth enjoys a similar fate.

But there were other movies at the box office this weekend, too. Let’s talk about those! READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'After Earth' trumped by 'Now You See Me' as 'Fast & Furious' wins Friday (again)

after-earth-12

Will and Jaden Smith may want to pick up some new Cartier before they take a look at this week’s box office numbers. It might help to ease the pain.

The father/son duo’s new M. Night Shyamalan-directed adventure After Earth only earned $9.8 million on its opening Friday (technically, that number includes Thursday night shows as well), which puts it on pace for a weekend of just $27 million — a tough result considering the poorly reviewed Sony effort cost $130 million and carried Will Smith-sized expectations.

Moreover, After Earth was overshadowed by Summit’s magician thriller Now You See Me, which worked up some box office magic on Friday, pulling an impressive $10.1 million out of its hat. Now You See Me will also end the weekend with about $27 million, which sounds a whole lot healthier given its $80 million budget.

Of course, neither of the newcomers were able to topple Fast & Furious 6 from the top of the chart. The explosive hit scored $10.5 million on its second Friday and should finish the weekend in first place with about $35 million and $170 million total.

Rounding out the Top 5 was The Hangover Part III, which dropped 64 percent from its first Friday to $5.2 million, and Star Trek Into Darkness, which beamed up another $4.4 million. Both films should finish the weekend with over $15 million — a figure that Epic, which came in sixth place with $4.1 million, will likely reach as well.

1. Fast & Furious 6 – $10.5 million
2. Now You See Me – $10.1 million
3. After Earth – $9.8 million
4. The Hangover Part III – $5.2 million
5. Star Trek Into Darkness – $4.4 million

Check back tomorrow for the full box office report, and follow me on Twitter for more up-to-the-minute box office updates.

Read more:
Analysis: People love ‘Fast & Furious 6′, but not as much as they loved ‘Fast Five’
Box office preview: ‘After Earth’ ready to race ‘Fast & Furious’ for the top spot

Box office preview: 'After Earth' ready to race 'Fast & Furious 6' for the top spot

after-earth-13.jpg

Hey box office nerds, I’m back! What have I missed? Oh, just the highest grossing Memorial Day weekend in history? Well, it’s not like I was irrationally excited about the Fast & Furious 6 vs. The Hangover Part III showdown or anything…

But the box office waits for no one. It’s a new weekend with new releases — namely, the Will/Jaden Smith adventure After Earth and the magician thriller Now You See Me — and the former has a shot at taking out Fast & Furious 6 as the number one movie in America. (Meanwhile, The Hangover Part III seems likely to plummet out of the Top 5 altogether.)

Here’s how the frame may play out: READ FULL STORY

Box office report: 'Fast & Furious 6' breaks $100 million, 'Hangover III' sobers up on record-breaking weekend

Here’s what the Memorial Day weekend taught us: America really likes the Fast & Furious franchise, but America loves movies. The four-day holiday racked up $314 million in receipts, the largest-ever Memorial Day weekend at the box office. As for Fast 6, it’s hard to talk about the successful opening without resorting to cliché. Despite hitting theaters in a crowded May marketplace, the Universal film earned an estimated $120,019,000, the fourth-highest Memorial Day opening in history, for a per-theater average of $33,400. That’s the second-biggest opening this year, behind Iron Man 3, and a sizable leap from the trajectory of the previous two Fasts (and most predictions).

READ FULL STORY

Box office update: 'Fast & Furious 6' revs up

Who knew we all loved fast cars that much? Fast & Furious 6, the latest entry in the super-speed action series, earned an estimated $98,528,000 for the three-day weekend. It may be on track for a four-day opening gross north of $120 million. This beats the opening of Fast 5 ($86 million), though it’s roughly the same margin of growth if you don’t count the holiday. (Fast & Furious opened with $70 million.)

READ FULL STORY

Sounds like a Summer Movie: How 'Star Trek' uses music to move you (and made you cry)

After exploring how children’s electric cars and remote-controlled jets were instrumental for creating the sounds of Iron Man’s suit in Iron Man 3, the second installment of our new series Sounds Like a Summer Movie takes a look at how music is used for dramatic impact in Star Trek Into Darkness. And it is used a lot: Sound mixer Will Files, who first worked with director J.J. Abrams on Cloverfield, estimates there’s music over 75 to 80 percent of the film. Once again, Abrams used longtime collaborator Michael Giacchino, who won an Oscar for scoring Up. “J.J. and Michael take a pretty classic approach to scoring a film in that it’s more about the emotional beats in a scene and trying to figure out which character’s perspective you are trying to play in that moment, who you are trying to connect the audience with,” Files says. “Because of that, you end up with something that is not quite as generically action movie-oriented. You have a score that’s much more lyrical because it’s playing these broader strokes of emotion rather than the minutia of the actual action that’s happening on the screen.”  READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP