Inside Movies Breaking Movie News and Scoops | Movie Reviews

Tag: Tina Fey (1-10 of 37)

'Mean Girls' reunion: Could there be a sequel -- and which stars would be up for it?

It’s been a decade since Mean Girls was released, but affection for the film only seems to get stronger with each passing year. Tina Fey has already announced that a stage musical is in development—but could the Plastics ever team up for another big-screen outing? (Paramount did release a straight-to-DVD sequel in 2011.)

For our Reunions issue, on stands now, EW asked each actress—as well as Fey—whether they’d want to revisit the Girls. READ FULL STORY

EW's 'Mean Girls' reunion: The cast looks back on the 2004 hit

One sure sign of a film’s legacy: Does it inspire its own holiday?

If you happened to be anywhere near the Internet on Oct. 3, you probably noticed an outpouring of nostalgia for 2004’s Mean Girls. The reason? A throwaway line uttered by Lindsay Lohan’s Cady: “It’s October 3rd.”

That may seem a pretty slim thread to hang an entire day on, but it’s indicative of the fervent fan base for this new-classic teen comedy. Written by Tina Fey and directed by Mark Waters (Vampire Academy), Mean Girls stars Lohan as a high school student at a new school who infiltrates the Plastics, a group of nasty popular girls led by queen bee Regina (Rachel McAdams) and her underlings: insecure Gretchen (Lacey Chabert) and dumb-as-a-stump Karen (Amanda Seyfried). The film became a surprise sleeper hit, earning $129 million worldwide and gaining an even bigger following on DVD. In the decade since, Mean Girls has joined Clueless and Sixteen Candles in the teen-comedy canon.

For its 10th anniversary, EW invited the film’s female leads to our own little pep rally, where they talked about their memories, behind-the-scenes magic, and what they think their characters would be doing now. READ FULL STORY

The hidden family heartache behind director Shawn Levy's 'This Is Where I Leave You'

Shawn Levy is what happens when someone who has never forgotten what it means to be a boy becomes a dad.

The director of Real Steel, the Night at the Museum movies, and the new bittersweet family comedy This Is Where I Leave You (in theaters now), is an undeniable family guy. The father of four girls, he’s known for making movies about households run amok (2003’s Cheaper By the Dozen) and parents who desperately want an evening away (2010’s Date Night,) as well as fathers who redeem themselves in their kids’ eyes with the help of boxing robots or magical museums.

At 46, he looks like he should still be carded when buying a six-pack, and he has the irrepressible energy of a teenager who hasn’t yet hit the surly stage.

Having built a career on high-concept visual effects movies and straight-up comedies, the filmmaker has been yearning to do something a little more grown-up. That brought him to This Is Where I Leave You, Jonathan Tropper’s 2009 novel about quarreling siblings (Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Corey Stoll, and Adam Driver) who are all drawn back home after a family death. Their pushy mother (Jane Fonda) wants them not only to bury their father, but a few hatchets as well.

Here’s what Levy (pictured at far right in the photo above) had to say about growing up as a filmmaker … READ FULL STORY

Casting Net: Tina Fey developing 'Untitled Witch Project' with Disney, more

Tina Fey is in early development on a “supernatural-themed feature” with Disney known as the Untitled Witch Project, but it is decidedly not a Hocus Pocus sequel (as was the rumor early Wednesday). According to the report, the project will be in the vein of Ghostbusters, and Fey will star and produce. Next up for Fey is the Jonathan Tropper adaptation This is Where I Leave You, out Sept. 19. She’s currently filming the comedy The Nest, alongside Amy Poehler.  [Deadline]

READ FULL STORY

'Crazy, Stupid, Love' duo will direct Tina Fey 'Taliban' movie

Tina Fey’s next movie will have some Crazy, Stupid directors. EW has confirmed a report that Glenn Ficarra and John Requa, the directorial team behind Crazy, Stupid, Love and the upcoming Will Smith film, Focus, will helm Taliban Shuffle, with the 30 Rock star playing a wartime journalist in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The film is based on Kim Barker’s humorous memoir, with 30 Rock exec producer and scribe Robert Carlock penning the screenplay. Lorne Michaels is producing, along with Fey.

Barker was sent to the Middle East soon after the 2002 U.S. invasion, and her experiences as a single female journalist dropped into a male-dominated Islamic culture, combined with the daily absurdities of military and media interactions, made for a surreal black comedy when she published her book in 2011. An early New York Times book review compared her “character” to a “a sort of Tina Fey.”

[The Hollywood Reporter]

John Leguizamo joins Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's comedy 'The Nest'

According to a report from VarietyJohn Leguizamo (seen earlier this year in Chef) will appear alongside Tina Fey and Amy Poehler in the upcoming comedy The Nestwhich will be released on December 18, 2015.

The Nest, directed by Pitch Perfect‘s Jason Moore and written by Paula Pell, is about two sisters who decide to throw one last party in their childhood home before their parents sell it.

The cast also includes fellow Saturday Night Live alumna Maya Rudolph, who will play a childhood friend of Poehler and Fey’s characters; The Mindy Project‘s Ike Barinholz as the male lead and Poehler’s character’s love interest; and  Greta Lee (of Girls) as a woman who gets a “pity invite” to the party. From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series‘s Madison Davenport will play Fey’s daughter.

Fey is producing the film alongside Jay Roach, and Poehler will executive produce.

 

James Brolin cast as Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's father in 'The Nest'

James Brolin is about to become a father, again.

EW has confirmed that Brolin was cast as Tina Fey and Amy Poehler’s father in Universal’s comedy The Nest. The film follows Fey and Poehler as two sisters who decide to throw one final party before the sale of their parents’ home. The Nest, which also stars The Mindy Project‘s Ike Barinholtz, is directed by Jason Moore based on an original script from SNL‘s Paula Pell.

Deadline first reported the news.

'This Is Where I Leave You': Six movie revelations from BookCon

You can go home again — sometimes with less drama than going to your actual home.

Five years ago, author Jonathan Tropper debuted This Is Where I Leave You at Book Expo America, and on Friday afternoon he returned to his old stomping grounds to present footage from the upcoming film version of the novel, about a combative family brought together by their father’s funeral.

The event kicked off BookCon, the new public section of the convention, and along for the ride were director Shawn Levy (Real Steel, the Night at the Museum movies) and stars Tina Fey and Jason Bateman. “I’m going to keep bringing movie stars on book tours, because I never get this crowd,” Tropper told the packed auditorium.

Here are six things fans should know about the movie, which comes out Sept. 12:

READ FULL STORY

'This Is Where I Leave You' trailer: Tina Fey and Jason Bateman learn you can go home again

The award for best cast of 2014 may already be locked up. Just look at the trailer for This Is Where I Leave You, starring (deep breath) Tina Fey, Jason Bateman, Corey Stoll, Adam Driver, Jane Fonda, Rose Byrne, Kathryn Hahn, Connie Britton, Ben Schwartz, Timothy Olyphant, and Dax Shepard.

Based on 2009’s best-selling novel by Jonathan Tropper (who wrote the screenplay), the dramedy follows four adult children (Fey, Bateman, Stoll and Driver) who return to their mother’s (Jane Fonda) house for a week when their father dies. “We need a new term for the tone. It’s not a dark comedy — because it’s not that dark. But it’s an ­emotional ­comedy,” Fey told EW.

Watch below: READ FULL STORY

'This Is Where I Leave You': FIRST LOOK at Tina Fey, Jason Bateman's emotional family funeral comedy

Remember that line from The Godfather: “Never tell anybody outside the family what you’re thinking”? In This Is Where I Leave You, it’s probably best not to tell the family, either. The bittersweet comedy about troubled siblings who reunite for their father’s funeral is like a group hug crossed with a battle royal.

“We need a new term for the tone. It’s not a dark comedy—because it’s not that dark. But it’s an ­emotional ­comedy,” says Tina Fey, who plays the pushy sister to three equally neurotic and combative brothers: Corey Stoll, Jason Bateman, and Adam Driver. Jane Fonda costars as their prying psychologist mother, who will either unite her estranged family or destroy it trying. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Movies

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP